Latest & greatest articles for urinary tract infection

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Top results for urinary tract infection

141. Cost effectiveness of management strategies for urinary tract infections: results from randomised controlled trial

Cost effectiveness of management strategies for urinary tract infections: results from randomised controlled trial Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2010 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

142. Predicting acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection in women: a systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs

Predicting acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection in women: a systematic review of the diagnostic accuracy of symptoms and signs Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2010 DARE.

143. Effectiveness of five different approaches in management of urinary tract infection: randomised controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effectiveness of five different approaches in management of urinary tract infection: randomised controlled trial. To assess the impact of different management strategies in urinary tract infections.Randomised controlled trial.Primary care.309 non-pregnant women aged 18-70 presenting with suspected urinary tract infection.Patients were randomised to five management approaches: empirical antibiotics; empirical delayed (by 48 hours) antibiotics; or targeted antibiotics based on a symptom score

2010 BMJ Controlled trial quality: predicted high

144. Women's views about management and cause of urinary tract infection: qualitative interview study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Women's views about management and cause of urinary tract infection: qualitative interview study. To explore the views of women with urinary tract infection on the acceptability of different strategies for managing the infection, including delayed use of antibiotics, and the cause of infection.Qualitative interview study with semistructured one to one interviews within a randomised controlled trial of different management strategies. Analysis drew on some of the principles of constant (...) comparison to generate key themes grounded in reported experiences and understandings.Seven general practices across four counties in southern England.21 women presenting to general practices who were taking part in the larger trial.Women preferred not to take antibiotics and were open to alternative management approaches. With a strategy of "antibiotic delay" some women felt a lack of validation or that they were not listened to by their general practitioner. Women attributed urinary tract infection

2010 BMJ Controlled trial quality: uncertain

145. Cost effectiveness of management strategies for urinary tract infections: results from randomised controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cost effectiveness of management strategies for urinary tract infections: results from randomised controlled trial. To assess the cost effectiveness of different management strategies for urinary tract infections.Cost effectiveness analysis alongside a randomised controlled trial with a one month follow-up.Primary care.309 non-pregnant adult women aged 18-70 presenting with suspected urinary tract infection.Patients were randomised to five basic management approaches: empirical antibiotics

2010 BMJ Controlled trial quality: uncertain

146. Cranberry is not effective for the prevention or treatment of urinary tract infections in individuals with spinal cord injury Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cranberry is not effective for the prevention or treatment of urinary tract infections in individuals with spinal cord injury Cranberry is not effective for the prevention or treatment of urinary tract infections in individuals with spinal cord injury Cranberry is not effective for the prevention or treatment of urinary tract infections in individuals with spinal cord injury Opperman EA CRD summary The review found that limited evidence suggested that cranberry (in juice or supplement form) did (...) not seem to be effective in preventing or treating urinary tract infections in people with spinal cord injury. The author's cautious conclusion reflected the evidence presented, but its reliability is uncertain due to weaknesses in the review process. Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of cranberry for the prevention or treatment of urinary tract infections in people with spinal cord injury. Searching The MEDLINE database was searched; search terms were reported. Reference lists

2010 DARE.

147. Hydrophilic catheters versus noncoated catheters for reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections: a randomized controlled trial (Abstract)

Hydrophilic catheters versus noncoated catheters for reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections: a randomized controlled trial Cardenas DD, Hoffman JM. Hydrophilic catheters versus noncoated catheters for reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections: a randomized controlled trial.To test the hypotheses that hydrophilic catheters reduce the incidence of symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) in persons with spinal cord injury on self-intermittent catheterization (IC

2010 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

148. Systematic review and meta-analysis: reminder systems to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections and urinary catheter use in hospitalized patients

Systematic review and meta-analysis: reminder systems to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections and urinary catheter use in hospitalized patients Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2010 DARE.

149. Implications of 99mTc-DMSA Scintigraphy Performed During Urinary Tract Infection in Neonates (Abstract)

Implications of 99mTc-DMSA Scintigraphy Performed During Urinary Tract Infection in Neonates To evaluate prospectively whether normal scintigraphic results during urinary tract infections (UTIs) in neonates were predictive of the absence of dilating vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) (grade > or =III) and permanent renal damage (PRD).Term neonates with a first symptomatic, community-acquired UTI participated in the study. Urinary tract ultrasonography and technetium-99m-labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid

2009 EvidenceUpdates

150. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection and the medicare rule changes. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Catheter-associated urinary tract infection and the medicare rule changes. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection, a common and potentially preventable complication of hospitalization, is 1 of the hospital-acquired complications chosen by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) for which hospitals no longer receive additional payment. To help readers understand the potential consequences of the recent CMS rule changes, the authors examine the preventability of catheter (...) -associated infection, review the CMS rule changes regarding catheter-associated urinary tract infection, offer an assessment of the possible consequences of these changes, and provide guidance for hospital-based administrators and clinicians. Although the CMS rule changes related to catheter-associated urinary tract infection are controversial, they may do more good than harm, because hospitals are likely to redouble their efforts to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection, which may minimize

2009 Annals of Internal Medicine

151. Antibiotic prophylaxis at urinary catheter removal prevents urinary tract infections: a prospective randomized trial. (Abstract)

Antibiotic prophylaxis at urinary catheter removal prevents urinary tract infections: a prospective randomized trial. To assess whether antibiotic prophylaxis at urinary catheter removal reduces the rate of urinary tract infections.Urinary tract infections are among the most common nosocomial infections. Antibiotic prophylaxis at urinary catheter removal is used as a measure to prevent them, albeit without supporting evidence.A prospective randomized study enrolled 239 patients undergoing (...) elective abdominal surgery, who were randomized either for receiving 3 doses of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole at urinary catheter removal, or not. Urinary tract infections were diagnosed according to Center of Disease Control definitions. Urinary cultures were obtained before and 3 days after catheter removal. Subjective symptoms were assessed by an independent study-blind urologist.Patients who received antibiotic prophylaxis showed significantly fewer urinary tract infections (5/103, 4.9%) than those

2009 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

152. Dipsticks and diagnostic algorithms in urinary tract infection: development and validation, randomised trial, economic analysis, observational cohort, and qualitative study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Dipsticks and diagnostic algorithms in urinary tract infection: development and validation, randomised trial, economic analysis, observational cohort, and qualitative study Dipsticks and diagnostic algorithms in urinary tract infection: development and validation, randomised trial, economic analysis, observational cohort, and qualitative study Journals Library An error has occurred in processing the XML document An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page (...) Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} Study found that, to achieve good symptom control and reduce antibiotic use in urinary tract infection, clinicians should probably either offer a 48-hour delayed antibiotic prescription to be used at the patient's

2009 NIHR HTA programme

153. Management of childhood urinary tract infections: an economic modeling study

Management of childhood urinary tract infections: an economic modeling study Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

154. Antibiotic prophylaxis for children at risk of developing urinary tract infection: a systematic review

Antibiotic prophylaxis for children at risk of developing urinary tract infection: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

155. Bladder irrigation with amphotericin B and fungal urinary tract infection: systematic review with meta-analysis

Bladder irrigation with amphotericin B and fungal urinary tract infection: systematic review with meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

156. Immunoactive prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis

Immunoactive prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections: a meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.

157. Antibiotic prophylaxis and recurrent urinary tract infection in children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antibiotic prophylaxis and recurrent urinary tract infection in children. Antibiotics are widely administered to children with the intention of preventing urinary tract infection, but adequately powered, placebo-controlled trials regarding efficacy are lacking. This study from four Australian centers examined whether low-dose, continuous oral antibiotic therapy prevents urinary tract infection in predisposed children.We randomly assigned children under the age of 18 years who had had one (...) or more microbiologically proven urinary tract infections to receive either daily trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole suspension (as 2 mg of trimethoprim plus 10 mg of sulfamethoxazole per kilogram of body weight) or placebo for 12 months. The primary outcome was microbiologically confirmed symptomatic urinary tract infection. Intention-to-treat analyses were performed with the use of time-to-event data.From December 1998 to March 2007, a total of 576 children (of 780 planned) underwent randomization

2009 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

158. A dipstick clinical prediction rule modestly improved diagnostic precision in women with suspected urinary tract infection

A dipstick clinical prediction rule modestly improved diagnostic precision in women with suspected urinary tract infection A dipstick clinical prediction rule modestly improved diagnostic precision in women with suspected urinary tract infection | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using (...) your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here A dipstick clinical prediction rule modestly improved diagnostic precision in women with suspected urinary tract infection Article Text Clinical

2009 Evidence-Based Medicine

159. Prophylaxis after first febrile urinary tract infection in children? A multicenter, randomized, controlled, noninferiority trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prophylaxis after first febrile urinary tract infection in children? A multicenter, randomized, controlled, noninferiority trial Febrile urinary tract infections are common in children and associated with the risk for renal scarring and long-term complications. Antimicrobial prophylaxis has been used to reduce the risk for recurrence. We performed a study to determine whether no prophylaxis is similar to antimicrobial prophylaxis for 12 months in reducing the recurrence of febrile urinary tract (...) infections in children after a first febrile urinary tract infection.The study was a controlled, randomized, open-label, 2-armed, noninferiority trial comparing no prophylaxis with prophylaxis (co-trimoxazole 15 mg/kg per day or co-amoxiclav 15 mg/kg per day) for 12 months. A total of 338 children who were aged 2 months to <7 years and had a first episode of febrile urinary tract infection were enrolled: 309 with a confirmed pyelonephritis on a technetium 99m dimercaptosuccinic acid scan with or without

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

160. Cranberries can prevent recurrent urinary tract infections in women

Cranberries can prevent recurrent urinary tract infections in women PEARLS Practical Evidence About Real Life Situations PEARLS are succinct summaries of Cochrane Systematic Reviews for primary care practitioners. They Cranberries can prevent recurrent urinary tract infections in women Clinical question How effective are cranberry products in preventing urinary tract infections (UTIs) in susceptible populations? Bottom line There was some evidence that cranberries (juice or capsules) may (...) needs to be taken to be effective or what the required dose might be. Context No definite mechanism of action has been established for cranberries in the prevention or treatment of UTI. However, the main suggestion is cranberries prevent bacteria, particularly Escherichia coli, from adhering to uroepithelial cells lining the bladder. Without adhesion, E. coli cannot infect the mucosal surface of the urinary tract. Cochrane Systematic Review Jepson RG and Craig JC. Cranberries for preventing urinary

2008 Publication 410