Latest & greatest articles for palliative care

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Top results for palliative care

181. Effect of Palliative Care-Led Meetings for Families of Patients With Chronic Critical Illness: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Palliative Care-Led Meetings for Families of Patients With Chronic Critical Illness: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Family caregivers of patients with chronic critical illness experience significant psychological distress.To determine whether family informational and emotional support meetings led by palliative care clinicians improve family anxiety and depression.A multicenter randomized clinical trial conducted from October 2010 through November 2014 in 4 medical intensive care units (...) (ICUs). Adult patients (aged ≥21 years) requiring 7 days of mechanical ventilation were randomized and their family surrogate decision makers were enrolled in the study. Observers were blinded to group allocation for the measurement of the primary outcomes.At least 2 structured family meetings led by palliative care specialists and provision of an informational brochure (intervention) compared with provision of an informational brochure and routine family meetings conducted by ICU teams (control

2016 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

182. Palliative care in patients with heart failure. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Palliative care in patients with heart failure. Despite advances in cardiac therapy, heart failure (HF) remains a progressive, highly symptomatic, and deadly disease that places great demands on patients, caregivers, and healthcare systems. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to care that focuses on communication, shared decision making, and advance care planning; provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms; integrates psychological and spiritual aspects of care (...) ; and offers a support system to help families cope during illness and bereavement. Palliative care has applications across the stages of heart failure, including early in the course of illness, often in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life. However, the incorporation of palliative care into the management of heart failure has been suboptimal for several reasons: uncertainty in the disease trajectory, failure to reward communication between healthcare providers and patients

2016 BMJ

183. What are best practice service models in rural areas for the delivery of end of life and palliative care?

, Duggleby W. Using a quality framework to assess rural palliative care . J Palliat Care. 2010 Autumn;26 (3):141-50. 4. Pesut B, Pesut B. Feasibility of a rural palliative supportive service. Rural & Remote Health 2015: 15(2):3116 -Jun. 5. Kuziemsky C, Jewers H, Appleby B, Foshay N, Maccaull W, Miller K, Macdonald M. Information technology and hospice palliative care: social, cultural, ethical and technical implications in a rural setting. Informatics for Health and Social Care 2012 Jan; 37(1):37-50 6 (...) What are best practice service models in rural areas for the delivery of end of life and palliative care? Objectives To provide specific, innovative examples of best practice service models for end of life and palliative care services (cancer and non-cancer) in rural areas applicable to the UK. In addition, to: ? Explore potential of new technology (tele-rehabilitation, tele -health, tele-medicine) in enhancing access to and the sustainability of rural services. ? Identify the barriers

2016 Palliative Care Evidence Review Service (PaCERS)

184. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Scenario: End of life

Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Scenario: End of life Scenario: End of life | Management | Palliative care - nausea and vomiting | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Scenario: End of life Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Scenario: End of life Last revised in October 2016 Scenario: End of life From age 16 years onwards. How do I recognize the terminal phase? It can often be difficult to be certain that a person is dying, but it is essential to recognize the signs of dying in order (...) cancer patients [ ]. These recommendations are largely based on the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guideline Care of dying adults in the last days of life [ ]. The basis for the NICE recommendations has been briefly summarized in this section. For detailed information on the evidence NICE used to make these recommendations, see the full What simple measures may help nausea and vomiting in palliative care? Make sure the person has access to a large bowl, tissues, and water

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

185. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing levomepromazine

Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing levomepromazine Prescribing levomepromazine | Prescribing information | Palliative care - nausea and vomiting | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Prescribing levomepromazine Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing levomepromazine Last revised in October 2016 Prescribing levomepromazine Levomepromazine is a first-generation antipsychotic drug which acts predominantly by blocking dopamine type 2 (D 2 ) receptors in the brain. It is usually (...) are an unlicensed preparation and are available on a named-patient basis only. They can be ordered directly from the manufacturer (but this can take up to 48 hours) or they may be available through the local palliative care team or hospice. If the 6 mg tablets are not available, experts suggest using a quarter of a 25 mg tablet (that is 6.25 mg). Adverse effects include sedation (particularly at doses of 25 mg or more in 24 hours), dose-dependent postural hypotension, and antimuscarinic adverse effects (dry

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

186. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Scenario: Assessment

Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Scenario: Assessment Scenario: Assessment | Management | Palliative care - nausea and vomiting | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Scenario: Assessment Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Scenario: Assessment Last revised in October 2016 Scenario: Assessment From age 16 years onwards. How should I assess the person and determine the cause of nausea and vomiting? Use findings from the , , and to try and identify the cause of the nausea and vomiting (...) ). Neurological signs and photophobia may be absent. Increased intracranial pressure Nausea and/or sudden vomiting on movement (for example turning in bed). Motion-associated emesis Nausea present in waves — may be triggered by a previously experienced stimulus and may be relieved by distraction. Anxiety-related nausea Constant nausea, variable vomiting. Chemically induced nausea Data from: [ ; ] Basis for recommendation These recommendations are pragmatic advice, based on expert opinion in palliative care

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

187. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing hyoscine butylbromide

Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing hyoscine butylbromide Prescribing hyoscine butylbromide | Prescribing information | Palliative care - nausea and vomiting | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Prescribing hyoscine butylbromide Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing hyoscine butylbromide Last revised in October 2016 Prescribing hyoscine butylbromide Hyoscine butylbromide must not be confused with hyoscine hydrobromide, which is used in lower doses. Hyoscine butylbromide (...) with caution in people with: Angle-closure glaucoma — antimuscarinics may precipitate glaucoma in these people, particularly the elderly. Bladder outflow obstruction (prostatism). Conditions predisposing to tachycardia (including hyperthyroidism, cardiac insufficiency, and cardiac surgery). Pyrexia — use in pyrexia or hot weather may lead to heatstroke. These recommendations are based on palliative care literature from a textbook and the British National Formulary [ ; ]. © .

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

188. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Scenario: Known cause

mechanoreceptors in the bowel wall or capsules of organs are stimulated by stretch or distortion by a tumour, stimulating the vomiting centre via the vagus and splanchnic nerves [ ]. Anti-emetics active at the vomiting centre may therefore help to palliate nausea in this situation [ ]; cyclizine acts on acetylcholine and histamine type 1 (H 1 ) receptors in the vomiting centre [ ]; [ ]. The recommended anti-emetic doses are consistent with specialist palliative care guidelines for the management of nausea (...) Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Scenario: Known cause Scenario: Known cause | Management | Palliative care - nausea and vomiting | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Scenario: Known cause Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Scenario: Known cause Last revised in October 2016 Scenario: Known cause From age 16 years onwards. How should I manage nausea and vomiting of known cause? Manage the underlying cause or correct reversible causes if possible and appropriate. Try to relieve symptoms

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

189. Cohort study: Community palliative care use by dementia sufferers may reduce emergency department use at end of life

Cohort study: Community palliative care use by dementia sufferers may reduce emergency department use at end of life Community palliative care use by dementia sufferers may reduce emergency department use at end of life | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Community palliative care use by dementia sufferers may reduce emergency department use at end of life Article Text Care of the older person Cohort study Community palliative care

2016 Evidence-Based Nursing

190. Optimising palliative and end-of-life care within care home settings Full Text available with Trip Pro

Optimising palliative and end-of-life care within care home settings Optimising palliative and end-of-life care within care home settings | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password (...) * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Optimising palliative and end-of-life care within care home settings Article Text EBN opinion Optimising palliative and end-of-life care within care home settings Gary Mitchell 1 , Alison Twycross 2 Statistics from Altmetric.com Background The World

2016 Evidence-Based Nursing

191. Quantitative study?other: Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs

Quantitative study?other: Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers (...) of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs Article Text Nursing issues Quantitative study—other Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs Ronda G Hughes

2016 Evidence-Based Nursing

192. Palliative Care and Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association

palliation and family support. MCS and Palliative Care Except for emergency situations, prospective MCS patients should meet with palliative care providers before MCS implantation to assist them with the decision-making process and to help with their perioperative management. Of note, inclusion of a palliative care specialist on the MCS team is mandated for obtaining VAD certification from The Joint Commission. Although The Joint Commission requires involvement of palliative care specialists for patients (...) Palliative Care and Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Palliative Care and Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search October 2019 September 2019 August 2019 July 2019 June 2019 May 2019 April 2019 March 2019 February 2019 January 2019 This site

2016 American Heart Association

193. Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care Full Text available with Trip Pro

Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update | Journal of Clinical Oncology Search in: Menu Article Tools ASCO SPECIAL ARTICLE Article Tools OPTIONS & TOOLS COMPANION ARTICLES No companion articles ARTICLE CITATION DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2016.70.1474 Journal of Clinical Oncology - published online before print October 31, 2016 PMID: Integration (...) of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update x Betty R. Ferrell , x Jennifer S. Temel , x Sarah Temin , x Erin R. Alesi , x Tracy A. Balboni , x Ethan M. Basch , x Janice I. Firn , x Judith A. Paice , x Jeffrey M. Peppercorn , x Tanyanika Phillips , x Ellen L. Stovall , x Camilla Zimmermann , and x Thomas J. Smith Betty R. Ferrell, City of Hope Medical Center, Duarte, CA; Jennifer S. Temel and Jeffrey M. Peppercorn, Massachusetts

2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

194. Palliative Care in the Outpatient Setting

Palliative Care in the Outpatient Setting ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Palliative Care in the Outpatient Setting A Comparative Effectiveness Report Final Report April 27, 2016 Completed by: Institute for Clinical and Economic Review ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Page i AUTHORS: Courtney Cunningham, MPH Program Director Karin Travers, DSc Research Director Rick Chapman, PhD, MS Director of Health Economics Anne Loos, MA Research Associate Erin Lawler, MA (...) Program and Communications Associate Shanshan Liu, MS, MPH Research Associate Steven D. Pearson, MD, MSc President Daniel A. Ollendorf, PhD Chief Scientific Officer DATE OF PUBLICATION: April 27, 2016 ICER would like to thank Rebecca Kirch, JD, Consultant to the Center to Advance Palliative Care for her peer review of the draft report. ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Page ii About ICER The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) is an independent non-profit research

2016 California Technology Assessment Forum

195. Routine Bowel Care for Patients in Long-Term or Palliative Care: Guidelines

Routine Bowel Care for Patients in Long-Term or Palliative Care: Guidelines Routine Bowel Care for Patients in Long-Term or Palliative Care: Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Routine Bowel Care for Patients in Long-Term or Palliative Care: Guidelines Routine Bowel Care for Patients in Long-Term or Palliative Care: Guidelines Published on: December 7, 2015 Project Number: RB0940-000 Product Line: Research Type: Devices and Systems Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type (...) : Report Question What are the guidelines for routine bowel care of long-term care seniors and palliative care residents? Key Message Two evidence-based guidelines were identified regarding routine bowel care of long-term care seniors and palliative care residents. Tags constipation, defecation, diarrhea, duodenal obstruction, fecal impaction, fecal incontinence, geriatrics, long-term care, nursing homes, palliative care, palliative Files Rapid Response Summary of Abstracts Published : December 7, 2015

2015 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

197. Palliative Care. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Palliative Care. 26605939 2015 11 27 2018 12 02 1533-4406 373 22 2015 11 26 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Palliative Care. 2188 10.1056/NEJMc1511946 Hashemian S Mohammadreza SM Beheshti Shahid S Miller James J eng Letter Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2015 Aug 20;373(8):747-55 26287850 Critical Illness therapy Humans Palliative Care 2015 11 26 6 0 2015 11 26 6 0 2015 12 15 6 0 ppublish 26605939 10.1056/NEJMc1511946 10.1056

2015 NEJM

198. Palliative Care. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Palliative Care. 26605940 2015 11 27 2018 12 02 1533-4406 373 22 2015 11 26 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Palliative Care. 2188-9 10.1056/NEJMc1511946 McGovern Terrance T Catapano Anthony A Shroff Ninad N eng Letter Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2015 Aug 20;373(8):747-55 26287850 Critical Illness therapy Humans Palliative Care 2015 11 26 6 0 2015 11 26 6 0 2015 12 15 6 0 ppublish 26605940 10.1056/NEJMc1511946 10.1056

2015 NEJM

199. Antimicrobials at the End of Life: An Opportunity to Improve Palliative Care and Infection Management Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antimicrobials at the End of Life: An Opportunity to Improve Palliative Care and Infection Management 26426830 2015 12 24 2018 11 13 1538-3598 314 19 2015 Nov 17 JAMA JAMA Antimicrobials at the End of Life: An Opportunity to Improve Palliative Care and Infection Management. 2017-8 10.1001/jama.2015.13080 Juthani-Mehta Manisha M Yale School of Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. Malani Preeti N PN University of Michigan Health System (...) -94 20472860 Am J Hosp Palliat Care. 2012 Dec;29(8):599-603 22218916 J Pain Symptom Manage. 2013 Oct;46(4):483-90 23317761 J Palliat Med. 2013 Dec;16(12):1568-74 24151960 Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2014 Sep;58(9):5473-7 25001299 JAMA Intern Med. 2014 Oct;174(10):1660-7 25133863

2015 JAMA

200. Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane Review published in Issue 4, 2013, on Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care.Nausea and vomiting are common, distressing symptoms for patients receiving palliative care. There are several drugs which can be used to treat these symptoms, known as antiemetics. Levomepromazine is an antipsychotic drug is commonly used as an antiemetic to alleviate nausea and vomiting (...) in palliative care settings.To evaluate the efficacy of, and adverse events associated with, levomepromazine for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients.For this update we searched electronic databases, including those of Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE, up to February 2015. We searched clinical trial registers on 7 October 2015 for ongoing trials.Randomised controlled trials of levomepromazine for the treatment of nausea or vomiting

2015 Cochrane