Latest & greatest articles for palliative care

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Top results for palliative care

1. Home-Based Primary and Palliative Care in the Medicaid Program: Systematic Review of the Literature

Home-Based Primary and Palliative Care in the Medicaid Program: Systematic Review of the Literature Home-Based Primary and Palliative Care in the Medicaid Program: Systematic Review of the Literature - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable. COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation. Get the latest public health (...) ? Report format: Send at most: Send even when there aren't any new results Optional text in email: Save Cancel Create a file for external citation management software Create file Cancel Your RSS Feed Name of RSS Feed: Number of items displayed: Create RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Display options Display options Format Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Review J Am Geriatr Soc Actions . 2020 Sep 21. doi: 10.1111/jgs.16837. Online ahead of print. Home-Based Primary and Palliative Care

2020 EvidenceUpdates

2. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of hospital-based specialist palliative care for adults with advanced illness and their caregivers. (Abstract)

The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of hospital-based specialist palliative care for adults with advanced illness and their caregivers. Serious illness is often characterised by physical/psychological problems, family support needs, and high healthcare resource use. Hospital-based specialist palliative care (HSPC) has developed to assist in better meeting the needs of patients and their families and potentially reducing hospital care expenditure. There is a need for clarity (...) registers to August 2019, together with checking of reference lists and relevant systematic reviews, citation searching and contact with experts to identify additional studies.We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the impact of HSPC on outcomes for patients or their unpaid caregivers/families, or both. HSPC was defined as specialist palliative care delivered by a palliative care team that is based in a hospital providing holistic care, co-ordination by a multidisciplinary team

2020 Cochrane

3. Immediate versus delayed short-term integrated palliative care for advanced long-term neurological conditions: the OPTCARE Neuro RCT Full Text available with Trip Pro

Immediate versus delayed short-term integrated palliative care for advanced long-term neurological conditions: the OPTCARE Neuro RCT Immediate versus delayed short-term integrated palliative care for advanced long-term neurological conditions: the OPTCARE Neuro RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try (...) a website search above to find the information you need. >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} This trial found that immediate short-term integrated palliative care did not lead to a statistically significant improvement in patient-reported physical symptoms compared to standard care after 12 weeks. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , & . Nilay Hepgul 1 , Rebecca Wilson 1 , Deokhee Yi 1 , Catherine Evans 1, 2 , Sabrina

2020 NIHR HTA programme

4. Covid-19: Guidelines for Community Palliative Care – which is the ‘Best in Show’?

Covid-19: Guidelines for Community Palliative Care – which is the ‘Best in Show’? Covid-19: Guidelines for Community Palliative Care - which is the ‘Best in Show’? - CEBM CEBM The Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine develops, promotes and disseminates better evidence for healthcare. Navigate this website Covid-19: Guidelines for Community Palliative Care – which is the ‘Best in Show’? August 10, 2020 Dr Lyn Jenkins, on behalf of Correspondence to Love them or hate them, guidelines (...) are a necessary component of medical practice. And with the arrival of the previously unknown disease of Covid-19, we need guidelines more than ever. This includes guidelines for palliative care, as confirmed by the in urging the early development of protocols in the context of disasters, including pandemics. [Chapter 4] In an ideal world, guidelines would be a distillation of the evidence, a blue-print for treatment, a ‘score’ from which the doctor performs the ‘music’ of medicine. But writing guidelines

2020 Oxford COVID-19 Evidence Service

5. Association between palliative care and healthcare outcomes among adults with terminal non-cancer illness: population based matched cohort study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association between palliative care and healthcare outcomes among adults with terminal non-cancer illness: population based matched cohort study. To measure the associations between newly initiated palliative care in the last six months of life, healthcare use, and location of death in adults dying from non-cancer illness, and to compare these associations with those in adults who die from cancer at a population level.Population based matched cohort study.Ontario, Canada between 2010 (...) and 2015.113 540 adults dying from cancer and non-cancer illness who were given newly initiated physician delivered palliative care in the last six months of life administered across all healthcare settings. Linked health administrative data were used to directly match patients on cause of death, hospital frailty risk score, presence of metastatic cancer, residential location (according to 1 of 14 local health integration networks that organise all healthcare services in Ontario), and a propensity score

2020 BMJ

6. End of life and palliative care: the policy landscape

projections and implications for services. BMC Med. 15(1), 102. 4. Bone AE, et al. (2018). What is the impact of population ageing on the future provision of end-of-life care? Population-based projections of place of death. Palliat. Med. 32(2), 329-336. 5. The Academy of Medical Sciences (2018). Multimorbidity: a priority for global health research. https://acmedsci.ac.uk/file- download/82222577 6. Murtagh FE, et al. (2013). How many people need palliative care? A study developing and comparing methods (...) on the future provision of end-of-life care? Population-based projections of place of death. Palliat. Med. 32(2), 329-336. 10. Barnett K, et al. (2012). Epidemiology of multimorbidity and implications for health care, research, and medical education: a cross-sectional study. Lancet 380(9836), 37-43. 11. Worldwide Palliative Care Alliance and World Health Organisation (2014). Global Atlas of Palliative Care at the End of Life. https://www.who.int/nmh/Global_Atlas_of_Palliative_Care.pdf 12. Etkind SN, et al

2020 Academy of Medical Sciences

7. EAN guideline on palliative care of people with severe, progressive multiple sclerosis

EAN guideline on palliative care of people with severe, progressive multiple sclerosis EAN guideline on palliative care of people with severe, progressive multiple sclerosis A. Solari a , A. Giordano a,b , J. Sastre-Garriga c ,S.K€ opke d,e , A. C. Rahn e , I. Kleiter f , K. Aleksovska g , M. A. Battaglia h , J. Bay i , M. Copetti j , J. Drulovic k , L. Kooij l , J. Mens l , E. R. Meza Murillo c , I. Milanov m , R. Milo n,o , T. Pekmezovic p , J. Vosburgh q , E. Silber r , S. Veronese s , F (...) Keywords: clinical practice guideline, GRADE assessment, multiple sclerosis, palliative care Received 3 March 2020 Accepted 25 March 2020 European Journal of Neurology 2020, 0: 1–20 doi:10.1111/ene.14248 Background and purpose: Patients with severe, progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) have complex physical and psychosocial needs, typically over several years. Few treatment options are available to prevent or delay further clinical worsen- ing in this population. The objective was to develop an evidence

2020 European Academy of Neurology

8. Covid-19: access to out-of-hours palliative and end-of-life care at home

Covid-19: access to out-of-hours palliative and end-of-life care at home Covid-19: access to out-of-hours palliative and end-of-life care at home - CEBM CEBM The Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine develops, promotes and disseminates better evidence for healthcare. Navigate this website Covid-19: access to out-of-hours palliative and end-of-life care at home June 16, 2020 Dr Lyn Jenkins, on behalf of Correspondence to Five years ago, the James Lind Alliance carried out research using (...) their Priority Setting Partnership protocol to identify the most important national concerns about palliative and end-of-life (EOL) care. Top of their list was the question: ‘What are the best ways of providing palliative care outside working hours to avoid crises and help patients stay in their place of choice?’ Since then, the organisation has instigated several investigations, with some completed and some still ongoing. Findings so far show that in the last year of their lives, patients with known life

2020 Oxford COVID-19 Evidence Service

9. Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines – temporary COVID-19 guidance

Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines – temporary COVID-19 guidance Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines - Home Scottish Palliative Care Guidelines search Updates 23/06/2020 The weekly research on COVID-19 and Palliative Care is now available. 17/06/2020 The for June is now available. 17/04/2020 has been issued by Scottish Government indicating that Morphine sulfate solution for injection 10mg/mL should be permanently adopted as first line opioid of choice, where clinically appropriate, in place (...) of Diamorphine 5mg and 10mg. The NHS Scotland palliative care guidelines will be amended to reflect this permanent change in due course. 09/04/2020 We need your on the COVID-19 guidelines Home COVID-19 - Our Response The palliative care community will stand with those who are facing suffering related to any illness, those who die during this pandemic, those who face bereavement and all who provide care. Temporary guidelines are now available for symptom management: Guidance for Guidance for supporting end

2020 Covid-19 Ad hoc papers

10. Palliative Care Considerations For Patients With Cardiovascular Disease Under COVID-19

Palliative Care Considerations For Patients With Cardiovascular Disease Under COVID-19 Palliative Care Considerations For Patients With Cardiovascular Disease Under COVID-19 - American College of Cardiology ') Search All Types Search or Menu CBT=cognitive behavioral therapy; IV=intravenous; po=by mouth; SL=sublingually + People with Parkinsonism, Lewy body disease or pre-existing cogwheel rigidity, for whom haloperidol is contraindicated, quetiapine 12.5-25 mg orally up to 4 times daily can (...) in significant consequences for patients who require complex medical decisions in a resource scarce health care environment. Palliative care provides assistance to providers to integrate planning and comfort into care. Telehealth can advance palliative care initiatives especially prior to hospitalization. By providing support to our most vulnerable adult patients, we can minimize pain and suffering and promote dignity. This article was authored by John Mulrow, MD, FACC, FSCAI , Cardiology Clinic of San

2020 American College of Cardiology

11. Covid-19: Management of palliative care in hospital during the coronavirus pandemic

Covid-19: Management of palliative care in hospital during the coronavirus pandemic Publications approval reference: 001559 Specialty guides for patient management during the coronavirus pandemic Clinical guide for the management of palliative care in hospital during the coronavirus pandemic Keeping the care in healthcare 27 March 2020, Version 1 As clinicians, we all have responsibilities in relation to coronavirus and we should seek and act on national and local guidelines. We have a specific (...) responsibility to institute best practice palliative care for all patients who require this, either with pre-existing palliative care needs or because of coronavirus infection. We may need to work outside our specific areas of training and expertise, and the General Medical Council (GMC) has already indicated its support for this in the exceptional circumstances we may face. All hospitals have access to specialist palliative care teams, whether as in-house hospital palliative care teams or in-reach teams

2020 Covid-19 Ad hoc guidelines

12. A palliative approach to care in the last 12 months of life

A palliative approach to care in the last 12 months of life Best Practice Guideline MARCH 2020 A Palliative Approach to Care in the Last 12 Months of LifeDisclaimer These guidelines are not binding on nurses, other health providers or the organizations that employ them. The use of these guidelines should be flexible and based on individual needs and local circumstances. They constitute neither a liability nor discharge from liability. While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy (...) be produced, reproduced and published in its entirety, without modification, in any form, including in electronic form, for educational or non-commercial purposes. Should any adaptation of the material be required for any reason, written permission must be obtained from RNAO. Appropriate credit or citation must appear on all copied materials as follows: Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario. A palliative approach to care in the last 12 months of life. Toronto (ON): Registered Nurses’ Association

2020 Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario

13. Palliative Care for Adults

Palliative Care for Adults Sixth Edition January 2020 www.icsi.org Copyright © 2020 by Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement 1 Health Care Guideline: Palliative Care for Adults Text in blue in this algorithm indicates a linked corresponding annotation. Does patient choose hospice, and is hospice available? Patient presents with new or established diagnosis of a serious illness Initiate palliative care discussion 1 Assess patient’s palliative care needs based on the speci?ed domains (...) of palliative care 2 Does patient meet hospice criteria? yes yes Social aspects of care Psychological and psychiatric aspects of care Spiritual aspects of care Ethical and legal aspects of care Cultural aspects of care Physical aspects of care 4 5 6 7 8 9 Develop or revise palliative care plan and establish goals of care through the process of shared decision-making 10 Implement palliative care plan Through periodic reassessment, is the care plan meeting the patient’s needs? no yes Remission or resolution

2020 Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement

14. Palliative care - oral

Palliative care - oral Palliative care - oral | Topics A to Z | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Palliative care - oral Palliative care - oral Last revised in October 2018 Common oral problems in palliative care include dry mouth, painful mouth, halitosis, alteration of taste, and excessive salivation. Diagnosis Management Prescribing information Background information Palliative care - oral: Summary Common oral problems in palliative care include dry mouth, painful mouth, halitosis, alteration (...) of taste, and excessive salivation. They may result from poor oral intake, drug treatments, local irradiation, oral tumours, or chemotherapy. Oral symptoms may significantly affect the person's quality of life, causing eating, drinking, and communication problems, and oral discomfort and pain. When assessing a person with oral symptoms in palliative care: Ask about dry mouth, oral pain, halitosis, alteration in taste, excessive salivation, bad breath, difficulty chewing, difficulty speaking, dysphagia

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

15. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Scenario: Unknown cause

Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Scenario: Unknown cause Scenario: Unknown cause | Management | Palliative care - nausea and vomiting | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Scenario: Unknown cause Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Scenario: Unknown cause Last revised in October 2016 Scenario: Unknown cause From age 16 years onwards. What simple measures may help nausea and vomiting in palliative care? Make sure the person has access to a large bowl, tissues, and water. The sight and smell (...) are based on palliative care literature from textbooks [ ; ; ] and published journal articles [ ; ]. Evidence from a small observational study (n = 54) of hospice patients suggested that acupressure has benefit in controlling nausea and vomiting [ ]. Although the study had methodological weaknesses which limit the findings, the risk of this technique is probably low; acupressure bands are safe and easy to administer [ ]. CKS could not find studies relating to acupuncture or relaxation for people

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

16. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing haloperidol

Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing haloperidol Prescribing haloperidol | Prescribing information | Palliative care - nausea and vomiting | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Prescribing haloperidol Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing haloperidol Last revised in October 2016 Prescribing haloperidol Haloperidol is usually given orally, once or twice a day, to treat chemically or metabolically induced vomiting. This is an off-label indication for haloperidol tablets (...) and oral solution. At the low doses used in palliative care, adverse effects (for example dystonias, dyskinesia, and akathisia) are unusual. This information is based on palliative care literature from a textbook [ ] and the British National Formulary [ ]. © .

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

17. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing dexamethasone

Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing dexamethasone Prescribing dexamethasone | Prescribing information | Palliative care - nausea and vomiting | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Prescribing dexamethasone Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing dexamethasone Last revised in October 2016 Prescribing dexamethasone Dexamethasone is generally given as a single dose in the morning but may be given via a syringe driver when appropriate. If large doses cannot be taken at once (...) the disadvantages of intrusive treatment of a dying person against the risks of not providing treatment. These recommendations are based on palliative care literature from a textbook [ ]. The information on dyspepsia and indigestion are based on a published review article [ ] and the British National Formulary [ ]. © .

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

18. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing cyclizine

Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing cyclizine Prescribing cyclizine | Prescribing information | Palliative care - nausea and vomiting | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Prescribing cyclizine Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing cyclizine Last revised in October 2016 Prescribing cyclizine Cyclizine is useful for managing vagally-mediated nausea and vomiting caused by mechanical bowel obstruction, raised intracranial pressure, and movement disorders. Cyclizine can (...) be given two to three times a day by mouth, subcutaneously, or intravenously; or by continuous subcutaneous infusion. Subcutaneous administration may cause skin irritation at the injection site. Drowsiness and antimuscarinic adverse effects (dry mouth and blurred vision) are common. This information is based on palliative care literature from a textbook [ ] and the British National Formulary [ ]. © .

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

19. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing an anti-emetic

Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing an anti-emetic Prescribing an anti-emetic | Prescribing information | Palliative care - nausea and vomiting | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Prescribing an anti-emetic Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing an anti-emetic Last revised in October 2016 Prescribing an anti-emetic What route of administration should I use? Oral administration is the route of choice. However, this may not be appropriate for people: Who cannot swallow (...) for octreotide). Use sodium chloride as the diluent for octreotide and consider a second syringe driver if octreotide is to be co-administered with other drugs. Before mixing drugs, check their compatibility. Always follow local palliative care guidelines or seek advice from local palliative care services or hospital pharmacy drug information services before mixing drugs in a syringe driver. Data are most often available on combinations of two drugs in a syringe driver, although some combinations of three

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

20. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing a prokinetic

Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing a prokinetic Prescribing a prokinetic | Prescribing information | Palliative care - nausea and vomiting | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Prescribing a prokinetic Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Prescribing a prokinetic Last revised in October 2016 Prescribing a prokinetic Prokinetics (metoclopramide and domperidone) should not be given concurrently with drugs with antimuscarinic activity (for example cyclizine, hyoscine) because (...) such as syncope or tachyarrhythmias arise during treatment. Should be avoided in people who are taking medication that prolongs the QT interval such as ketoconazole and erythromycin. Should be prescribed with caution in people aged over 60 years and people who have existing prolongation of cardiac conduction intervals (particularly the QTc interval), electrolyte disturbance, and an underlying cardiac disease (such as congestive heart failure). These recommendations are based mainly on palliative care

2020 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries