Latest & greatest articles for nitroglycerin

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Top results for nitroglycerin

41. GISSI-3: effects of lisinopril and transdermal glyceryl trinitrate singly and together on 6-week mortality and ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction. Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'infarto Miocardico. (Abstract)

GISSI-3: effects of lisinopril and transdermal glyceryl trinitrate singly and together on 6-week mortality and ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction. Gruppo Italiano per lo Studio della Sopravvivenza nell'infarto Miocardico. GISSI-3 is a multicentre randomised clinical trial to assess the efficacy of lisinopril, transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), and their combination in improving survival and ventricular function after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Between June, 1991 (...) , and July, 1993, 19,394 patients were randomised from 200 coronary care units in Italy. Eligible patients presented within 24 h of symptom onset and had no clear indications for or against the study treatments. In a factorial design patients were randomly assigned 6 weeks of oral lisinopril (5 mg initial dose and then 10 mg daily) or open control as well as nitrates (intravenous for the first 24 h followed by transdermal GTN 10 mg daily) or open control. Complete clinical data and 6-week follow-up were

1994 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

42. Quality of life on angina therapy: a randomised controlled trial of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate against placebo. (Abstract)

Quality of life on angina therapy: a randomised controlled trial of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate against placebo. In a randomised controlled trial in 427 men with chronic stable angina continuous use of 5 mg transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) showed no advantage over placebo in terms of efficacy (anginal attack rates and sublingual GTN consumption) or quality of life (as measured with the sickness impact profile and a health index of disability). Patients on the active drug reported (...) headaches more frequently than patients on placebo, and a higher proportion of them withdrew from the trial because of headache. Quality-of-life measurements showed a significant adverse effect of active treatment, principally in the social interaction dimension of the sickness impact profile. A similar effect was observed in placebo patients when crossed to active treatment in a 4-week single-blind period. The results suggest no benefit in the relief of chest pain from 5 mg transdermal GTN when used

1988 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

43. Use of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate to reduce failure of intravenous infusion due to phlebitis and extravasation. (Abstract)

Use of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate to reduce failure of intravenous infusion due to phlebitis and extravasation. Self-adhesive patches which release glyceryl trinitrate at a slow continuous rate or placebo patches were applied to the skin of patients distal to intravenous infusion sites in a double-blind manner. The frequency of infusion failure was three times lower with the glyceryl trinitrate than with placebo patches. The decrease was of similar magnitude whether failure was due

1985 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

44. Effects of intracoronary streptokinase and intracoronary nitroglycerin infusion on coronary angiographic patterns and mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. (Abstract)

Effects of intracoronary streptokinase and intracoronary nitroglycerin infusion on coronary angiographic patterns and mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction. We randomly assigned patients with a clinical diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction to one of four treatment groups: intracoronary streptokinase, intracoronary nitroglycerin, intracoronary streptokinase and intracoronary nitroglycerin, or conventional therapy without initial angiography. Of 124 patients 122 sustained (...) acute myocardial infarction. Initial angiography revealed total occlusion of the coronary artery responsible for infarction in 67 per cent (61 of 91). Acute recanalization occurred in 74 per cent (32 of 43) of patients receiving streptokinase but in only 6 per cent (1 of 18) of patients treated with nitroglycerin alone (P less than 0.01). At angiography of all four groups on Day 10 to 14 the vessel responsible for acute myocardial infarction was patent in 77 per cent (71 of 92) of patients

1984 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

45. Topical glyceryl trinitrate as adjunctive treatment in Raynaud's disease. (Abstract)

Topical glyceryl trinitrate as adjunctive treatment in Raynaud's disease. The effects of topical glyceryl trinitrate in Raynaud's disease were compared with those of placebo in a double-blind, crossover trial in 17 patients with bilateral Raynaud's disease and an associated collagen disease, who were receiving oral sympatholytic agents at the maximum levels they could tolerate. 1% glyceryl trinitrate ointment or a placebo of lanolin was applied to one hand only for 6 weeks, then patients (...) changed to the other preparation for 6 weeks. The results were evaluated every 2 weeks. The frequency of attacks, severity of attacks, and size of ulcers in the treated hand were significantly lower when the patients were using glyceryl trinitrate ointment than when they were using placebo. The treatment of Raynaud's disease may be improved by using topical glyceryl trinitrate ointment as an adjunct to a basic regimen of oral sympatholytic agents. Glyceryl trinitrate ointment may obviate the need

1982 Lancet

46. Burning sensation and potency of nitroglycerin sublingually. (Abstract)

Burning sensation and potency of nitroglycerin sublingually. 4621418 1972 03 17 2016 10 17 0098-7484 219 2 1972 Jan 10 JAMA JAMA Burning sensation and potency of nitroglycerin sublingually. 176-9 Copelan H W HW eng Clinical Trial Journal Article Randomized Controlled Trial United States JAMA 7501160 0098-7484 0 Tablets 0 Vasodilator Agents G59M7S0WS3 Nitroglycerin AIM IM Adult Drug Stability Erythema chemically induced Humans Male Middle Aged Mouth Floor Nitroglycerin administration & dosage

1972 JAMA Controlled trial quality: uncertain