Latest & greatest articles for multiple sclerosis

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Top results for multiple sclerosis

461. The effect of corticosteroids for acute optic neuritis on the subsequent development of multiple sclerosis. The Optic Neuritis Study Group. (Abstract)

The effect of corticosteroids for acute optic neuritis on the subsequent development of multiple sclerosis. The Optic Neuritis Study Group. Optic neuritis is often the first clinical manifestation of multiple sclerosis, but little is known about the effect of corticosteroid treatment for optic neuritis on the subsequent risk of multiple sclerosis.We conducted a multicenter study in which 389 patients with acute optic neuritis (and without known multiple sclerosis) were randomly assigned (...) to receive intravenous methylprednisolone (250 mg every six hours) for 3 days followed by oral prednisone (1 mg per kilogram of body weight) for 11 days, oral prednisone (1 mg per kilogram) alone for 14 days, or placebo for 14 days. Neurologic status was assessed over a period of two to four years. The patients in the first group were hospitalized for three days; the others were treated as outpatients.Definite multiple sclerosis developed within the first two years in 7.5 percent of the intravenous

1993 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

462. The Canadian cooperative trial of cyclophosphamide and plasma exchange in progressive multiple sclerosis. The Canadian Cooperative Multiple Sclerosis Study Group. (Abstract)

The Canadian cooperative trial of cyclophosphamide and plasma exchange in progressive multiple sclerosis. The Canadian Cooperative Multiple Sclerosis Study Group. To find out whether non-specific immunosuppression is beneficial in multiple sclerosis (MS) a randomised, placebo-controlled, single-masked trial was carried out in nine university centres. 168 patients with clinically or laboratory-supported definite MS in progressive phase (deterioration by at least 1.0 on the expanded disability

1991 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

463. Double-masked trial of azathioprine in multiple sclerosis. British and Dutch Multiple Sclerosis Azathioprine Trial Group. (Abstract)

Double-masked trial of azathioprine in multiple sclerosis. British and Dutch Multiple Sclerosis Azathioprine Trial Group. 354 patients with multiple sclerosis were randomised to receive either azathioprine 2.5 mg/kg daily or placebo in a double-masked trial. During follow-up of at least 3 years only small differences emerged between the groups. After 3 years the mean deterioration in Kurtzke disability score was 0.62 in the azathioprine group and 0.80 in the placebo group, a difference of 0.18 (...) recommended for most patients with multiple sclerosis. Analysis of subgroups (by sex, age, severity, rate of progression, HLA status, relapsing or progressive course) has not revealed any that have shown clear clinical benefit.

1988 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

464. Multicentre double-blind study of effect of intrathecally administered natural human fibroblast interferon on exacerbations of multiple sclerosis. (Abstract)

Multicentre double-blind study of effect of intrathecally administered natural human fibroblast interferon on exacerbations of multiple sclerosis. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2-year multicentre study intrathecally administered natural human fibroblast interferon (IFN-B) was effective in reducing exacerbations of multiple sclerosis (MS) in patients with exacerbating/remitting disease. The mean reduction in exacerbation rate of 34 patients who received IFN-B (recipients

1987 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

465. Exacerbations of multiple sclerosis in patients treated with gamma interferon. (Abstract)

Exacerbations of multiple sclerosis in patients treated with gamma interferon. In an open, randomised study, 18 patients with clinically definite, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) received 1 microgram, 30 micrograms, or 1000 micrograms doses of recombinant gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), given by intravenous infusion twice a week for four weeks. 7 patients had exacerbations during treatment. This exacerbation rate, compared retrospectively with the pretreatment rate and prospectively

1987 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

466. A pilot trial of Cop 1 in exacerbating-remitting multiple sclerosis. (Abstract)

A pilot trial of Cop 1 in exacerbating-remitting multiple sclerosis. Cop 1 is a random polymer (molecular weight, 14,000 to 23,000) simulating myelin basic protein. It is synthesized by polymerizing L-alanine, L-glutamic acid, L-lysine, and L-tyrosine. It suppresses but does not induce experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis. It is not toxic in animals. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled pilot trial, we studied 50 patients (...) with the exacerbating-remitting form of multiple sclerosis, who self-injected either 20 mg of Cop 1 dissolved in 1 ml of saline or saline alone daily for two years. Six of 23 patients in the placebo group (26 percent) and 14 of 25 patients in the Cop 1 group (56 percent) had no exacerbations (P = 0.045). There were 62 exacerbations in the placebo group and 16 in the Cop 1 group, yielding two-year averages of 2.7 and 0.6 per patient, respectively. Among patients who were less disabled on entry (Kurtzke disability

1987 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

467. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. (Abstract)

Effect of total lymphoid irradiation in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI; 1980 cGy) or sham irradiation was given to 40 patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) in a prospective, randomised, double-blind study. During mean follow-up of 21 months, MS patients treated with TLI had less functional decline than sham-irradiated MS patients (p less than 0.01). A significant relation was noted between absolute blood lymphocyte counts in the first

1986 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

468. Hyperbaric oxygen and multiple sclerosis: short-term results of a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. (Abstract)

Hyperbaric oxygen and multiple sclerosis: short-term results of a placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. In a study of 120 patients with chronic multiple sclerosis the effects of treatment with 100% oxygen at 2 atmospheres absolute for 90 min daily for a total of 20 exposures were compared with those of normal air at normal pressure for a similar length of time within the same compression chamber. No patient in either group showed any improvement on the Kurtzke disability status scale. 12 (...) of 51 patients in the hyperbaric-oxygen group and 3 of 47 control patients improved on the Kurtzke functional systems scale on the subjective bowel/bladder parameter only. Such a degree of improvement can also be achieved with medication for urinary symptoms, but none of the patients in this study received such medication. The short-term results of this trial do not support the claims made for hyperbaric oxygen in the management of multiple sclerosis.

1985 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

469. Intensive immunosuppression in progressive multiple sclerosis. A randomized, three-arm study of high-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide, plasma exchange, and ACTH. (Abstract)

Intensive immunosuppression in progressive multiple sclerosis. A randomized, three-arm study of high-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide, plasma exchange, and ACTH. Fifty-eight patients with severe, progressive multiple sclerosis were prospectively randomized to one of three treatments: 20 received intravenous ACTH, 20 received high-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide plus ACTH, and 18 were placed on a regimen consisting of plasma exchange, low-dose oral cyclophosphamide, and ACTH. The three groups (...) ; and in the plasma exchange group, 11 of 18 at six months and 9 of 18 at one year. High-dose cyclophosphamide plus ACTH was most effective in halting progression of the disease at both 6 and 12 months (at 12 months, cyclophosphamide-ACTH vs. ACTH, P = 0.0004; cyclophosphamide-ACTH vs. plasma exchange, P = 0.087). Thus, progressive multiple sclerosis may be stabilized by short-term, intensive immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide plus ACTH.

1983 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

470. Hyperbaric-oxygen treatment of multiple sclerosis. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. (Abstract)

Hyperbaric-oxygen treatment of multiple sclerosis. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Several uncontrolled studies have suggested a beneficial effect of hyperbaric oxygen on multiple sclerosis. We studied 40 patients with advanced chronic multiple sclerosis who were randomly divided into two matching groups. The experimental group received pure oxygen, and the placebo group received a mixture of 10 per cent oxygen and 90 per cent nitrogen; both groups were treated (...) ) in the oxygen group, neither of whom had had an initial response, and in 11 patients (55 per cent) in the placebo group, one of whom had had a positive initial response (P less than 0.0008). Minor ear problems and reversible myopia were the only side effects observed. These preliminary results suggest a positive, though transient, effect of hyperbaric oxygen on advanced multiple sclerosis, warranting further study. This therapy cannot be generally recommended without longer follow-up periods and additional

1983 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

471. Double-blind controlled trial of immunosuppression in the treatment of multiple sclerosis: final report. (Abstract)

Double-blind controlled trial of immunosuppression in the treatment of multiple sclerosis: final report. In a double-blind controlled trial 43 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis were treated either with anti-lymphocyte globulin, prednisolone, and azathioprine, or with placebo preparations. Treatment began with a combination of the three medicaments but after 1 month was continued for another 14 months with azathioprine (3 mg/kg dialy) only. There was a marginally beneficial

1982 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

472. Transfer factor in treatment of multiple sclerosis. (Abstract)

Transfer factor in treatment of multiple sclerosis. A 2-year prospective double-blind trial of the treatment of multiple sclerosis patients with the leucocyte extract, transfer factor (TF), obtained from leucocytes of relatives living with the patient, was conducted. 60 patients with definite MS, of whom 58 completed the trial, were divided into two equal groups, one of which received TF and the other placebo. The groups were evenly balanced with respect to sex ratios, disability, duration

1980 Lancet

473. Double-blind, controlled trial of immunosuppression in treatment of multiple sclerosis. (Abstract)

Double-blind, controlled trial of immunosuppression in treatment of multiple sclerosis. 30 multiple sclerosis patients in a double-blind, controlled trial were given immunosuppressive treatment consisting of antilymphocyte globulin, prednisolone, and azathioprine, or placebo. After 15 months of treatment the immunosuppressed group had a reduction in the number of relapses and some retardation of the clinical course of the disease (p < 0.06). The beneficial effect was seen only in females.

1980 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

474. Long-term transfer-factor treatment for multiple sclerosis. (Abstract)

Long-term transfer-factor treatment for multiple sclerosis. In groups of 16 patients with multiple sclerosis, 13 months' double-blind treatment with transfer factor from random normal donors differed from placebo treatment only in producing a temporary restoration of lymphocyte reactivity to measles virus antigen, and did not arrest the degeneration of nerve tissue.

1978 Lancet