Latest & greatest articles for infection

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on infection and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for infection

1. Are you infectious if you have a positive PCR test result for COVID-19? Full Text available with Trip Pro

to cross a certain threshold. This allows very small samples of RNA to be amplified and detected. The lower the cycle threshold level the greater the amount of RNA (genetic material) there is in the sample. The higher the cycle number, the less RNA there is in the sample. What does this mean? This detection problem is ubiquitous for RNA viruses detection. can be detected long after the disappearance of the infectious virus. The immune system works to neutralise the virus and prevent further infection (...) samples. Insufficient attention may have been paid how PCR results relate to disease. The relation with infectiousness is unclear and more data are needed on this. If this is not understood, PCR results may lead to restrictions for large groups of people who do not present an infection risk. The results indicate that viral RNA load cut-offs should be used: to understand who is infectious, the extent of any outbreak and for controlling transmission. What next? Our review is an . We will update

2020 Oxford COVID-19 Evidence Service

2. Systematic review and meta-analysis of effectiveness of treatment options against SARS-CoV-2 infection Full Text available with Trip Pro

Systematic review and meta-analysis of effectiveness of treatment options against SARS-CoV-2 infection Systematic review and meta-analysis of effectiveness of treatment options against SARS-CoV-2 infection - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable. COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation. Get the latest public (...) new results Optional text in email: Save Cancel Create a file for external citation management software Create file Cancel Your RSS Feed Name of RSS Feed: Number of items displayed: Create RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation J Med Virol Actions . 2020 Jul 15;10.1002/jmv.26302. doi: 10.1002/jmv.26302. Online ahead of print. Systematic review and meta-analysis of effectiveness of treatment options against SARS-CoV-2 infection , , , , , Affiliations Expand

2020 EvidenceUpdates

3. Infectious Diseases Society of America Guidelines on the Treatment and Management of Patients with COVID-19 Full Text available with Trip Pro

there aren't any new results Optional text in email: Save Cancel Create a file for external citation management software Create file Cancel Your RSS Feed Name of RSS Feed: Number of items displayed: Create RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Clin Infect Dis Actions . 2020 Apr 27;ciaa478. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciaa478. Online ahead of print. Infectious Diseases Society of America Guidelines on the Treatment and Management of Patients with COVID-19 (...) : 32338708 PMCID: DOI: Free PMC article Item in Clipboard Infectious Diseases Society of America Guidelines on the Treatment and Management of Patients with COVID-19 Adarsh Bhimraj et al. Clin Infect Dis . 2020 . Free PMC article Show details Clin Infect Dis Actions . 2020 Apr 27;ciaa478. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciaa478. Online ahead of print. Authors , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Affiliations 1 Department of Infectious Diseases, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. 2 Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence

2020 EvidenceUpdates

4. Utilization of hepatitis C virus-infected organ donors in cardiothoracic transplantation: An ISHLT expert consensus statement Full Text available with Trip Pro

to 2 to 3 months to develop following virus exposure, donors who test Ab−/NAT+ are presumed to have recent infection. Theodoropoulos N Ison MG Jaramillo A Screening deceased organ donors for infectious diseases: optimization of testing. ASHI Q. 2012; 36 : 18-26 A NAT− result suggests absence of active infection; in the setting of an Ab+/NAT− donor, this could mean successfully treated or spontaneously resolved HCV infection. However, there is an eclipse period in which the virus may be inoculated (...) and transmitted but still undergoing a lag or early replication phase too low to be detected, even by the most sensitive methods such as NAT. As NAT may take 5 to 8 days to become detectable following infection acquisition, there may be false negatives if infection developed in the 5 to 8 days before testing. Kucirka LM Sarathy H Govindan P et al. Risk of window period hepatitis-C infection in high infectious risk donors: systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Transplant. 2011; 11 : 1188-1200 , Suryaprasad

2020 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation

5. Evidence summary of the immune response following infection with SARS-CoV-2

, the infectiousness of re-detected patients, and the association between the immune response and the severity of initial disease). ? Due to the recent emergence of the virus and the rapidly evolving evidence base, research questions relating to the duration of immunity and the reinfection rate following SARS-CoV-2 infection were further updated. Twenty- nine additional studies were identified, resulting in a total of 131 studies. ? Thirty-four studies were identified that examined the duration of antibody (...) coronaviruses? 4. What is the reinfection rate following recovery from acute SARS-CoV-2 infection? 5. Are individuals reinfected with SARS-CoV-2 or other human coronaviruses infectious? 6. Does the seroconversion rate and or timing, and duration of immunity, depend on the severity of the initial infection? The processes as outlined in HIQA’s protocol (available on www.hiqa.ie) were followed. Relevant databases of published literature and pre-print servers were searched. The original search was carried out

2020 Health Information and Quality Authority

6. Effect of Surgical Skin Antisepsis on Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Gynecological Laparoscopic Surgery: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

of Microbiology and Infectious Disease, The Royal Women's Hospital, Parkville, Australia. 5 Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. PMID: 32639545 PMCID: (available on 2021-07-08 ) DOI: Free PMC article Item in Clipboard Effect of Surgical Skin Antisepsis on Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Gynecological Laparoscopic Surgery: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial Uri P Dior et al. JAMA Surg . 2020 . Free PMC article Show details JAMA Surg Actions (...) Effect of Surgical Skin Antisepsis on Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Gynecological Laparoscopic Surgery: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial Effect of Surgical Skin Antisepsis on Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Gynecological Laparoscopic Surgery: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other

2020 EvidenceUpdates

7. Covid-19: What is known about how long the virus can survive with potential for infection on surfaces?

., Biscarini, S., Piralla, A., … Vecchia, M. (2020). Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 RNA contamination of inanimate surfaces and virus viability in a health care emergency unit. Clinical Microbiology and Infection, 26(8), 1094.e1-1094.e5. May 22, 2020 Prevalence Infectious Disease Emergency Unit, where febrile patients with respiratory symptoms were evaluated Infectious disease sub-intensive care ward for advanced respiratory care Italy RT-PCR Viral culture test Samples collected ~ 4 hours (...) ., Gilles, M., de Lamballerie, X., & Charrel, R.N. (2020). Prolonged infectivity of SARS-CoV-2 in fomites. Emerging Infectious Diseases. Epub ahead of print. Jun 24, 2020 Laboratory SARS-CoV-2 deposited on polystyrene plastic, aluminum, and glass for 96 hours France Viral culture test SARS-CoV-2 demonstrated viral stability for 96 hours on all tested surfaces. Protein mediums increased SARS-CoV-2 infectivity, suggesting that protein-rich mediums such as airway secretions can protect the expelled virus

2020 COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Service

8. How have affected jurisdictions handled previously positive cases in the context of re-exposure/re-infection?

How have affected jurisdictions handled previously positive cases in the context of re-exposure/re-infection? Version 1: May 29, 2020 Rapid Review: How have affected jurisdictions handled previously positive COVID-19 cases in the context of re- exposure/re-infection? Prepared by: The National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools Date: May 29, 2020 Suggested Citation: National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. (2020). Rapid Review: How have affected jurisdictions handled (...) previously positive COVID-19 cases in the context of re-exposure/re-infection? https://www.nccmt.ca/knowledge-repositories/covid-19-rapid-evidence-service. © 2020. National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools, McMaster University. All rights reserved. The National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools (NCCMT) is hosted by McMaster University and funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of the Public Health Agency of Canada

2020 COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Service

9. What is known on the potential for COVID-19 re-infection, including new transmission after recovery?

, but a variety of testing methodologies, timing of testing and definition of ‘recovery’ were used making comparisons difficult. Across all studies it is not clear whether these are new infections, or re-detection of prior infection. Across included case series and case reports, rates of re- detection ranged from 2% to 21%. In all studies, re-detected cases were asymptomatic. High Low Health Information and Quality Authority. (2020, May 13). Evidence summary of the infectiousness of individuals reinfected (...) ). Immunity after SARS-CoV-2 infection, 1 st update - a rapid review. Oslo: Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Health Information and Quality Authority. (2020, May 13). Evidence summary of the immune response following infection with SARS-CoV-2 or other human coronaviruses Health Information and Quality Authority. (2020, May 13). Evidence summary of the infectiousness of individuals reinfected with SARS-CoV-2 or other human coronaviruses Huang, J., Zheng, L., Li, Z., Hao, S., Ye, F., Chen, J., Yao, X

2020 COVID-19 Rapid Evidence Service

10. Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection and abortion care

be safely deferred, providers should assess and discuss with the woman whether she would be best cared for with a medical or surgical abortion (e.g. if there are suitable facilities in an obstetric unit or gynaecology ward) in consultation with infectious disease, anaesthesia and infection control colleagues. If she is unwell, care should be co-ordinated through a multidisciplinary team. If surgical abortion is performed: • Perform vacuum aspiration under local anaesthesia or intravenous sedation where (...) Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection and abortion care 1 Information for healthcare professionals Version 3.1: Published Friday 31 July 2020 Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection and abortion care2 Table of contents Chapter Pages Summary of updates 3 Flowchart: Summary of early medical abortion care management during COVID-19 pandemic 4 1. Introduction 5-9 2. Pathways to minimise COVID-19 exposure for women and staff 10-17 3. Abortion for women with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 18-21 4. Consent

2020 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

11. Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection and pregnancy

Coronavirus (COVID-19) infection and pregnancy 1 Information for healthcare professionals Version 11: Published Friday 24 July 2020 Coronavirus (COVID-19) Infection in Pregnancy2 Contents Summary of updates 3-6 1 Purpose and scope 7-12 2 Antenatal care during the COVID-19 pandemic 13-20 3 Venous thromboembolism prevention 21-23 4 Labour and birth during the COVID-19 pandemic 24-32 5 Managing clinical deterioration during the COVID-19 pandemic 33-38 6 Postnatal care 39-42 7 Acknowledgments 43 8 (...) in women with other coronaviruses. 5 Version Date Summary of changes 11 24.7.20 4.4: Amended advice: • If birth partners are symptomatic or in a period of self-isolation for confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, they should remain in self-isolation at home and not attend the unit. Advice removed: on birth partners being asked to remain by the woman’s bedside and not to walk around the ward/hospital. 11 24.7.20 4.5: Amended advice: • Women and their families should be aware that donning PPE for emergency

2020 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

12. A Novel Immune Modulator for Patients With Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections (NSTI): Results of a Multicenter, Phase 3 Randomized Controlled Trial of Reltecimod (AB 103)

A Novel Immune Modulator for Patients With Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections (NSTI): Results of a Multicenter, Phase 3 Randomized Controlled Trial of Reltecimod (AB 103) A Novel Immune Modulator for Patients With Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections (NSTI): Results of a Multicenter, Phase 3 Randomized Controlled Trial of Reltecimod (AB 103) - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History (...) . A Novel Immune Modulator for Patients With Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections (NSTI): Results of a Multicenter, Phase 3 Randomized Controlled Trial of Reltecimod (AB 103) , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 University of Washington, Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. 2 Atrium Health, Charlotte, North Carolina. 3 Ohio Health, Grant & Mansfield Hospitals, Columbus, Ohio. 4 University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland. 5 Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, North

2020 EvidenceUpdates

13. A Phase 2 Study of Pimodivir (JNJ-63623872) in Combination with Oseltamivir in Elderly and NonElderly Adults Hospitalized with Influenza A Infection: OPAL study Full Text available with Trip Pro

of Pimodivir (JNJ-63623872) in Combination with Oseltamivir in Elderly and NonElderly Adults Hospitalized with Influenza A Infection: OPAL study , , , , , , , , , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, Michigan, USA. 2 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA. 3 University Hospital of Tours, Tours, France. 4 Infectious Disease Research Unit, Department of Translational Medicine, Skåne (...) Infect Dis Actions . 2020 Jun 30;jiaa376. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiaa376. Online ahead of print. Authors , , , , , , , , , , , , , Affiliations 1 Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit Medical Center, Detroit, Michigan, USA. 2 Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA. 3 University Hospital of Tours, Tours, France. 4 Infectious Disease Research Unit, Department of Translational Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. 5 Servei de Pneumologia

2020 EvidenceUpdates

14. Vertical transmission risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the third trimester: a systematic scoping review Full Text available with Trip Pro

Vertical transmission risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the third trimester: a systematic scoping review Vertical transmission risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the third trimester: a systematic scoping review - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable. COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation. Get the latest public (...) new results Optional text in email: Save Cancel Create a file for external citation management software Create file Cancel Your RSS Feed Name of RSS Feed: Number of items displayed: Create RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med Actions . 2020 Jul 1;1-8. doi: 10.1080/14767058.2020.1786055. Online ahead of print. Vertical transmission risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the third trimester: a systematic scoping review

2020 EvidenceUpdates

15. COVID-19: guidance for stepdown of infection control precautions within hospitals and discharging COVID-19 patients from hospital to home settings

COVID-19: guidance for stepdown of infection control precautions within hospitals and discharging COVID-19 patients from hospital to home settings COVID-19: guidance for stepdown of infection control precautions within hospitals and discharging COVID-19 patients from hospital to home settings - GOV.UK Tell us whether you accept cookies We use about how you use GOV.UK. We use this information to make the website work as well as possible and improve government services. Accept all cookies You’ve (...) accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Stay at home Only go outside for food, health reasons or work (but only if you cannot work from home) If you go out, stay 2 metres (6ft) away from other people at all times Wash your hands as soon as you get home Do not meet others, even friends or family. You can spread the virus even if you don’t have symptoms. Guidance COVID-19: guidance for stepdown of infection control precautions within hospitals and discharging COVID-19 patients from

2020 Public Health England

16. Sexually Transmitted Infections: Behavioral Counseling

Sexually Transmitted Infections: Behavioral Counseling Recommendation | United States Preventive Services Taskforce Toggle navigation Main navigation Main navigation Recommendation to see the latest documents available. Recommendation Summary Population Recommendation Sexually Active Adolescents and Adults The USPSTF recommends intensive behavioral counseling for all sexually active adolescents and for adults who are at increased risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). B View (...) the Clinical Summary in Population Sexually active adolescents and adults at increased risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) Recommendation Offer or refer to intensive behavioral counseling interventions to prevent STIs. Grade: B Risk Assessment All sexually active adolescents are at increased risk for STIs. Other risk groups include adults with current STIs or other infections within the past year, adults who have multiple sex partners, and adults who do not consistently use condoms. Behavioral

2020 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

17. Guidance for contacts of people with confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) infection who do not live with the person

Guidance for contacts of people with confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) infection who do not live with the person Guidance for contacts of people with confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) infection who do not live with the person - GOV.UK Tell us whether you accept cookies We use about how you use GOV.UK. We use this information to make the website work as well as possible and improve government services. Accept all cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Guidance (...) and support Guidance Guidance for contacts of people with confirmed coronavirus (COVID-19) infection who do not live with the person Guidance for contacts of a person with a positive test result for coronavirus (COVID-19) who do not live with that person. Published 28 May 2020 Last updated 17 June 2020 — From: Documents HTML Details This guidance is for people who have been notified by NHS Test and Trace that they are a contact of a person who has had a positive test result for coronavirus (COVID-19

2020 Public Health England

18. Managing common infections: guidance for primary care

Managing common infections: guidance for primary care Managing common infections: guidance for primary care - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Guidance Managing common infections: guidance for primary care Guidance for managing common infections, including upper and lower respiratory, and urinary tract infections. Published 5 August 2010 Last updated 2 August 2019 — From: and Documents https (...) of the guidance available for public consultation. 15 February 2017 Uploaded the new versions of documents. 23 May 2016 Published updated guidance and summary tables. 21 August 2015 Updated guidance documents published. 12 June 2015 Updated guidance following minor review in April 2015. 21 November 2014 Updates: dose of pivmecillinam corrected; wording within urinary tract infections (UTIs) in adults clarified to make it clear that nitrofurantoin is first line, and trimethoprim and pivmecillinam

2020 Public Health England

19. Prevention and control measures for neonatal COVID-19 infection: a scoping review Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prevention and control measures for neonatal COVID-19 infection: a scoping review Prevention and control measures for neonatal COVID-19 infection: a scoping review - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable. COVID-19 is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation. Get the latest public health information from CDC: . Get the latest (...) : Save Cancel Create a file for external citation management software Create file Cancel Your RSS Feed Name of RSS Feed: Number of items displayed: Create RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Rev Bras Enferm Actions . 2020;73 Suppl 2:e20200467. doi: 10.1590/0034-7167-2020-0467. Epub 2020 Jul 13. Prevention and control measures for neonatal COVID-19 infection: a scoping review [Article in Portuguese, En] , , Affiliations Expand Affiliation 1 Universidade Federal

2020 EvidenceUpdates

20. Science to tackle non-communicable diseases in South Asia and beyond in the SDG era

Science to tackle non-communicable diseases in South Asia and beyond in the SDG era Science to tackle non-communicable diseases in South Asia and beyond in the SDG era Workshop report 23-24 January 2020 Colombo, Sri Lanka The Academy of Medical Sciences is the independent body in the UK representing the diversity of medical science. Our mission is to promote medical science and its translation into benefits for society. The Academy’s elected Fellows are the United Kingdom’s leading medical (...) Science to tackle non-communicable diseases in South Asia and beyond in the SDG era4 Executive summary Executive summary The incidence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is increasing around the world. NCDs are estimated to be responsible for 41 million deaths each year, many of which are categorised as ‘premature’, shortening lives for those aged between 30 and 69 years. NCDs are driven by rapid urbanisation, unhealthy lifestyles and diets, tobacco and alcohol use, physical inactivity and ageing

2020 Academy of Medical Sciences