Latest & greatest articles for children

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Top results for children

81. Evidence review to inform the development of National Standards for Children’s Social Services

7. Public Health Model of Care applied to children’s services 799 Figure 8. Child Safe Organisations WA: Guidelines 866 Figure 9. Socialstyrelsen definition of good health and social care 922 Figure 10. Prisma flow chart of evidence synthesis 110 Evidence review to inform the development of Draft National Standards for Children’s Social Services Health Information and Quality Authority Page 7 of 170 Executive Summary All children have a right to be safe, to have timely access to appropriate (...) includes all children’s social services, including aftercare services, provided to young people with care experience, from the point of their referral to a service until they transfer to another service or are discharged. Having one set of national standards for all services tasked with the welfare and protection of children will ensure that the interests of the child are put first, above individual service requirements and will promote a consistent, child-centred approach to service delivery. While

2020 HIQA Standards

82. Identifying Features of Approaches to Supporting Transitions from Child to Adult Care for Young People with Special Healthcare Needs

addressing other types of questions using the filters under System arrangements > Delivery arrangements for package of care/care pathways/disease management and continuity of care, and combined it with pediatric OR paediatric OR child OR youth in the open search. In PubMed, we used the Health Services Research queries topic-specific filter to search for process assessments and qualitative research (using a narrow search scope) using the following combination of terms: (pediatric OR paediatric OR child (...) of children with both mental and physical disabilities were equally fearful that their children’s futures would be unfulfilled or diminished.(11) Second, parents shared that the process of ‘letting go’ was particularly challenging, which involved stepping back from responsibilities in their child’s care as well as from their relationships built with pediatric providers.(11) Families felt a sense of loss and were concerned about building an entirely new network of support.(21) Regarding parents fighting

2020 McMaster Health Forum

83. Transmitted Home Oximetry and Duration of Home Oxygen in Premature Infants

Cancel Create a file for external citation management software Create file Cancel Your RSS Feed Name of RSS Feed: Number of items displayed: Create RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Pediatrics Actions . 2020 Aug;146(2):e20200079. doi: 10.1542/peds.2020-0079. Epub 2020 Jul 14. Transmitted Home Oximetry and Duration of Home Oxygen in Premature Infants , , , , , , , , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Divisions of Neonatology and lawrence.rhein (...) @umassmemorial.org. 2 Pediatric Pulmonology, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts. 3 Divisions of Neonatology and. 4 Division of Pediatric Pulmonology, School of Medicine, University of Connecticut and Connecticut Children's Medical Center, Hartford, Connecticut. 5 Division of Pediatric Pulmonology, Maria Fareri Children's Hospital, Valhalla, New York. 6 Division of Pediatric Pulmonology, Larner College of Medicine, The University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont. 7

2020 EvidenceUpdates

84. Safety and efficacy of intravenous belimumab in children with systemic lupus erythematosus: results from a randomised, placebo-controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

of intravenous belimumab in children with systemic lupus erythematosus: results from a randomised, placebo-controlled trial # , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , # , Collaborators, Affiliations Expand Collaborators Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) and the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group (PRCSG) : , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Affiliations 1 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Division of Rheumatology, University of Cincinnati (...) -217101. doi: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2020-217101. Online ahead of print. Authors # , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , # , Collaborators Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) and the Pediatric Rheumatology Collaborative Study Group (PRCSG) : , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , Affiliations 1 Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Division of Rheumatology, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA Hermine.brunner@cchmc.org. 2 Hospital Central "Dr

2020 EvidenceUpdates

85. Do home visiting programmes improve children's language development? A systematic review

influence the language development of the child. This review highlights that not all home visiting programmes measure the impact that the programme has on children's language development, and not all home visiting programmes achieve positive language outcomes. Initiating visits prenatally may help towards the improvement of children's language development. Future evaluations of home visiting programmes should explore this finding further, consider the language assessment tools selected, and improve (...) on the reporting of their language results. Keywords: Child; Home visits; Infant, high risk; Language; Socioeconomic factors; Speech; Systematic review. Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Similar articles Peacock S, Konrad S, Watson E, Nickel D, Muhajarine N. Peacock S, et al. BMC Public Health. 2013 Jan 9;13:17. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-13-17. BMC Public Health. 2013. PMID: 23302300 Free PMC article. Review. O'Toole C, Lee AS, Gibbon FE, van Bysterveldt AK, Hart NJ. O'Toole C, et al. Cochrane Database

2020 EvidenceUpdates

86. Comparison of As-Needed and Scheduled Posthospitalization Follow-up for Children Hospitalized for Bronchiolitis: The Bronchiolitis Follow-up Intervention Trial (BeneFIT) Randomized Clinical Trial

. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.1937. Online ahead of print. Comparison of As-Needed and Scheduled Posthospitalization Follow-up for Children Hospitalized for Bronchiolitis: The Bronchiolitis Follow-up Intervention Trial (BeneFIT) Randomized Clinical Trial , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Department of Pediatrics, Primary Children's Hospital, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City. 2 Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (...) . 3 Division of Biostatistics, Department of Population Health Sciences, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City. PMID: 32628250 DOI: Item in Clipboard Comparison of As-Needed and Scheduled Posthospitalization Follow-up for Children Hospitalized for Bronchiolitis: The Bronchiolitis Follow-up Intervention Trial (BeneFIT) Randomized Clinical Trial Eric R Coon et al. JAMA Pediatr . 2020 . Show details JAMA Pediatr Actions . 2020 Jul 6;e201937. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.1937

2020 EvidenceUpdates

87. Single-Dose Nirsevimab for Prevention of RSV in Preterm Infants. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Single-Dose Nirsevimab for Prevention of RSV in Preterm Infants. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, and a need exists for prevention of RSV in healthy infants. Nirsevimab is a monoclonal antibody with an extended half-life that is being developed to protect infants for an entire RSV season with a single intramuscular dose.In this trial conducted in both northern and southern hemispheres, we evaluated nirsevimab (...) for the prevention of RSV-associated lower respiratory tract infection in healthy infants who had been born preterm (29 weeks 0 days to 34 weeks 6 days of gestation). We randomly assigned the infants in a 2:1 ratio to receive nirsevimab, at a dose of 50 mg in a single intramuscular injection, or placebo at the start of an RSV season. The primary end point was medically attended RSV-associated lower respiratory tract infection through 150 days after administration of the dose. The secondary efficacy end point

2020 NEJM

88. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccination during Pregnancy and Effects in Infants. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccination during Pregnancy and Effects in Infants. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the dominant cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, with the most severe cases concentrated among younger infants.Healthy pregnant women, at 28 weeks 0 days through 36 weeks 0 days of gestation, with an expected delivery date near the start of the RSV season, were randomly assigned in an overall ratio of approximately 2:1 to receive a single intramuscular (...) dose of RSV fusion (F) protein nanoparticle vaccine or placebo. Infants were followed for 180 days to assess outcomes related to lower respiratory tract infection and for 364 days to assess safety. The primary end point was RSV-associated, medically significant lower respiratory tract infection up to 90 days of life, and the primary analysis of vaccine efficacy against the primary end point was performed in the per-protocol population of infants (prespecified criterion for success, lower bound

2020 NEJM

89. Early fortification of human milk versus late fortification to promote growth in preterm infants. (Abstract)

Early fortification of human milk versus late fortification to promote growth in preterm infants. Uncertainty exists about the optimal point at which multi-component fortifier should be added to human milk for promoting growth in preterm infants. The most common practice is to start fortification when the infant's daily enteral feed volume reaches 100 mL/kg body weight. Another approach is to commence fortification earlier, in some cases as early as the first enteral feed. Early fortification (...) of human milk could increase nutrient intake and growth rates but may increase the risk of feed intolerance and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC).To assess effects on growth and safety of early fortification of human milk versus late fortification in preterm infants To assess whether effects vary based upon gestational age (≤ 27 weeks; 28 to 31 weeks; ≥ 32 weeks), birth weight (< 1000 g; 1000 to 1499 g; ≥ 1500 g), small or appropriate for gestational age, or type of fortifier (bovine milk-based human

2020 Cochrane

90. Association of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act With Dietary Quality Among Children in the US National School Lunch Program. (Abstract)

Association of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act With Dietary Quality Among Children in the US National School Lunch Program. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, implemented nationwide in 2012, was intended to improve the nutritional quality of meals served in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP).To assess whether there was an association between the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 and dietary quality of lunch for students participating in the NSLP, stratified by income.Serial (...) cross-sectional study design, using National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data from 2007-2008, 2009-2010, 2013-2014, and 2015-2016, of students who were surveyed in the NHANES and were attending schools participating in the NSLP. Individuals who were aged 5 to 18 years, in kindergarten through 12th grade, enrolled in a school that served school lunch, and had a reliable weekday dietary recall were included.The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (prepolicy period: 2007-2010

2020 JAMA

91. Education of family members to support weaning to solids and nutrition in later infancy in term-born infants. (Abstract)

Education of family members to support weaning to solids and nutrition in later infancy in term-born infants. Education of family members about infant weaning practices could affect nutrition, growth, and development of children in different settings across the world.To compare effects of family nutrition educational interventions for infant weaning with conventional management on growth and neurodevelopment in childhood.We used the standard strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to search the Cochrane (...) studies). Modest effects on growth during infancy may not be of clinical significance. However, it is unclear whether these small improvements in growth parameters in the first two years of life affect long-term childhood growth and development. Further studies are needed to resolve this question.Copyright © 2020 The Cochrane Collaboration. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

2020 Cochrane

92. Beta-blockers for congestive heart failure in children. (Abstract)

Beta-blockers for congestive heart failure in children. Beta-blockers are an essential part of standard therapy in adult congestive heart failure and therefore, are expected to be beneficial in children. However, congestive heart failure in children differs from that in adults in terms of characteristics, aetiology, and drug clearance. Therefore, paediatric needs must be specifically investigated. This is an update of a Cochrane review previously published in 2009.To assess the effect of beta (...) -adrenoceptor-blockers (beta-blockers) in children with congestive heart failure.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS up to November 2015. Bibliographies of identified studies were checked. No language restrictions were applied.Randomised, controlled, clinical trials investigating the effect of beta-blocker therapy on paediatric congestive heart failure.Two review authors independently extracted and assessed data from

2020 Cochrane

93. Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in U.S. Children and Adolescents. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in U.S. Children and Adolescents. Understanding the epidemiology and clinical course of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) and its temporal association with coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is important, given the clinical and public health implications of the syndrome.We conducted targeted surveillance for MIS-C from March 15 to May 20, 2020, in pediatric health centers across the United States. The case definition included six criteria (...) %), glucocorticoids in 91 (49%), and interleukin-6 or 1RA inhibitors in 38 (20%).Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children associated with SARS-CoV-2 led to serious and life-threatening illness in previously healthy children and adolescents. (Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.).Copyright © 2020 Massachusetts Medical Society.

2020 NEJM

94. Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children in New York State. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children in New York State. A multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is associated with coronavirus disease 2019. The New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) established active, statewide surveillance to describe hospitalized patients with the syndrome.Hospitals in New York State reported cases of Kawasaki's disease, toxic shock syndrome, myocarditis, and potential MIS-C in hospitalized patients younger than 21 years of age and sent (...) % of the patients, respectively; 62% received vasopressor support, 53% had evidence of myocarditis, 80% were admitted to an intensive care unit, and 2 died. The median length of hospital stay was 6 days.The emergence of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children in New York State coincided with widespread SARS-CoV-2 transmission; this hyperinflammatory syndrome with dermatologic, mucocutaneous, and gastrointestinal manifestations was associated with cardiac dysfunction.Copyright © 2020 Massachusetts Medical

2020 NEJM

95. Effects of food supplementation on cognitive function, cerebral blood flow, and nutritional status in young children at risk of undernutrition: randomized controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

to -0.36, P=0.04) compared with FBF. Additionally, NEWSUP increased CBFi compared with the control meal and FBF in both age groups combined (1.14 mm2/s×10-8, 0.10 to 2.23, P=0.04 for both comparisons). Among children aged 4 and older, NEWSUP had no significant effect on working memory or anemia, but increased lean tissue compared with FBF (4.31 cm2, 0.34 to 8.28, P=0.03).Childhood undernutrition is associated with long term impairment in cognition. Contrary to current understanding, supplementary (...) Effects of food supplementation on cognitive function, cerebral blood flow, and nutritional status in young children at risk of undernutrition: randomized controlled trial. To assess the effects of food supplementation on improving working memory and additional measures including cerebral blood flow in children at risk of undernutrition.Randomized controlled trial.10 villages in Guinea-Bissau.1059 children aged 15 months to 7 years; children younger than 4 were the primary population.Supervised

2020 BMJ

96. Targeted client communication via mobile devices for improving maternal, neonatal, and child health. (Abstract)

versus non-digital TCC The effect is unknown due to lack of studies reporting this comparison. TCCMD versus digital non-targeted communication TCCMD may increase infant ARV/prevention of mother-to-child transmission treatment adherence (RR 1.26, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.48; low-certainty evidence). The effect on other outcomes is unknown due to lack of studies. Parents of children aged less than five years No studies reported on correct treatment, nutritional, or health outcomes. TCCMD versus standard care (...) Targeted client communication via mobile devices for improving maternal, neonatal, and child health. The global burden of poor maternal, neonatal, and child health (MNCH) accounts for more than a quarter of healthy years of life lost worldwide. Targeted client communication (TCC) via mobile devices (MD) (TCCMD) may be a useful strategy to improve MNCH.To assess the effects of TCC via MD on health behaviour, service use, health, and well-being for MNCH.In July/August 2017, we searched five

2020 Cochrane

97. Effect of Maternal Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation on Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia-Free Survival in Breastfed Preterm Infants: A Randomized Clinical Trial. (Abstract)

Effect of Maternal Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation on Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia-Free Survival in Breastfed Preterm Infants: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Maternal docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) supplementation may prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia, but evidence remains inconclusive.To determine whether maternal DHA supplementation during the neonatal period improves bronchopulmonary dysplasia-free survival in breastfed infants born before 29 weeks of gestation.Superiority, placebo-controlled (...) randomized clinical trial at 16 Canadian neonatal intensive care units (June 2015-April 2018 with last infant follow-up in July 2018). Lactating women who delivered before 29 weeks of gestation were enrolled within 72 hours of delivery. The trial intended to enroll 800 mothers, but was stopped earlier.There were 232 mothers (273 infants) assigned to oral capsules providing 1.2 g/d of DHA from randomization to 36 weeks' postmenstrual age and 229 mothers (255 infants) assigned to placebo capsules.The

2020 JAMA

98. Head midline position for preventing the occurrence or extension of germinal matrix-intraventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants. (Abstract)

Head midline position for preventing the occurrence or extension of germinal matrix-intraventricular haemorrhage in preterm infants. Head position during care may affect cerebral haemodynamics and contribute to the development of germinal matrix-intraventricular haemorrhage (GM-IVH) in very preterm infants. Turning the head toward one side may occlude jugular venous drainage while increasing intracranial pressure and cerebral blood volume. It is suggested that cerebral venous pressure (...) is reduced and hydrostatic brain drainage improved if the infant is cared for in the supine 'head midline' position.To assess whether head midline position is more effective than other head positions for preventing (or preventing extension) of GM-IVH in very preterm infants (< 32 weeks' gestation at birth).We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2019, Issue 9), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 12 September 2019), Embase

2020 Cochrane

99. Amoxicillin for 3 or 5 Days for Chest-Indrawing Pneumonia in Malawian Children. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Amoxicillin for 3 or 5 Days for Chest-Indrawing Pneumonia in Malawian Children. Evidence regarding the appropriate duration of treatment with antibiotic agents in children with pneumonia in low-resource settings in Africa is lacking.We conducted a double-blind, randomized, controlled, noninferiority trial in Lilongwe, Malawi, to determine whether treatment with amoxicillin for 3 days is less effective than treatment for 5 days in children with chest-indrawing pneumonia (cough lasting <14 days (...) or difficulty breathing, along with visible indrawing of the chest wall with or without fast breathing for age). Children not infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who were 2 to 59 months of age and had chest-indrawing pneumonia were randomly assigned to receive amoxicillin twice daily for either 3 days or 5 days. Children were followed for 14 days. The primary outcome was treatment failure by day 6; noninferiority of the 3-day regimen to the 5-day regimen would be shown if the percentage

2020 NEJM

100. Routine childhood immunisation schedule

tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email . Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. Details The routine childhood schedule for infants born on or after 1 January 2020 – revised June 2020 This is the routine childhood schedule for infants born on or after 1 (...) January 2020. The date has been revised to June 2020 to align with the complete routine immunisation schedule, which has been updated to include changes to the vaccine recommendations for those with absent or dysfunctioning spleen or complement disorder. No other changes have been made. The routine childhood schedule for infants born on or after 1 January 2020 This routine childhood immunisation schedule (January 2020) includes the Infanrix hexa© vaccine for the infant programme for infants born

2020 Public Health England