Latest & greatest articles for caries

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Top results for caries

181. Teeth Whitening Does Not Increase Susceptibility to Dental Caries

peroxide (30.1±9.2 vs 42.2±9.3). The 3 products did not significantly differ in caries assessment parameters except in total lesion area that is significantly higher in 10% (8603.4±1727.5) than in 20% (6060.8±2438.8) CP. Evidence Search ("Tooth Bleaching"[Mesh]) AND "Dental Caries Susceptibility"[Mesh] Comments on The Evidence The Alves article used two different products for both at-home (10% and 16% carbamide peroxide) and in-office (37% carbamide peroxide and 35% hydrogen peroxide) bleaching (...) regarding its influence on caries susceptibility of the bleached teeth. However, this review indicated that tooth whitening does not influence the patients’ risk of developing dental caries. Specialty/Discipline (Public Health) (General Dentistry) (Basic Science) Keywords Teeth whitening, Teeth bleaching, Dental caries, Caries susceptibility ID# 2187 Date of submission: 04/09/2012 E-mail thusu@livemail.uthscsa.edu Author Akshay Thusu Co-author(s) Co-author(s) e-mail Faculty mentor/Co-author Bennett T

2012 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

182. Patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are at a greater risk than healthy controls for caries, DMFT, plaque index increase and gingival index increase.

receiving therapy for head and neck cancer, is there an increase risk for of dental or oral disease compared to non-cancer patients? Clinical Bottom Line Patients that underwent chemo- or radiotherapy had a 21-37% prevalence of caries. This may be in part due to an increased plaque index and gingival index as compared to non-cancer patients. Fluoride use appears to reduce the level of caries, while the benefits of chlorhexidine rinse are not clear. This information is supported by a systematic review (...) and 14 were cross-sectional). Key results DENTAL CARIES prevalence overall = 28.1% (Chemotherapy = 37.3%, Radiotherapy = 24%, Both = 21.4%) DMFT = Overall = 9.19 (SD, 7.98, n= 457), Post-chemotherapy= 4.5 (SD, 2.88, n= 132), Post-radiotherapy = 17.01 (SD, 9.14, n=157); healthy controls = 4.4 (SD, 4.07, N=275)PLAQUE INDEX= Overall = 1.38 (AD, 0.25, n=189); Post-chemotherapy =1.46 (SD, 0.23, n=162) Healthy controls = 0.91 (SD, 0.12, n=152) Gingival Index - 1.02 (SD, 0.15; n=162); healthy controls

2012 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

183. Patients At High Caries Risk Due To having Poor Oral Hygiene Would Benefit Equally In Plaque Reduction From using Triclosan containing or Stannous Fluoride-containing Toothpastes

Clinical Question Would patients at high caries risk due to poor oral hygiene achieve more plaque reduction by using triclosan-containing toothpaste compared to stannous fluoride-containing toothpaste? Clinical Bottom Line There was no difference between triclosan-containing and stannous fluoride-containing anti-microbial tooth pastes for plaque reduction. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1 (...) Patients At High Caries Risk Due To having Poor Oral Hygiene Would Benefit Equally In Plaque Reduction From using Triclosan containing or Stannous Fluoride-containing Toothpastes UTCAT2267, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Patients At High Caries Risk Due To having Poor Oral Hygiene Would Benefit Equally In Plaque Reduction From Using Triclosan Containing or Stannous Fluoride-Containing Toothpastes

2012 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

184. No Significant Effects of Interproximal Enamel Reduction Found on Caries Risk Assessment in Orthodontics

greater number of inter-proximal caries found on the surfaces treated with enamel stripping than on the control surfaces. Majority of the caries were on occlusal surfaces. #2) Zachrisson/2011 Patients received mesiodistal enamel reduction 4 years before clinical examination. Clinical Comparative Study Key results Only 2.5% new caries lesions were found on the reproximated surfaces compared to 2.4% new lesions on the ungrounded inter-proximal surfaces. There was no increased tooth sensitivity reported (...) . Evidence Search "Orthodontics"[Mesh] AND "Dental Caries"[Mesh] AND (Interproximal[All Fields] AND reduction[All Fields]) Comments on The Evidence In Jarjoura article, a non-randomized controlled trial was performed on 40 patients of mean age 19.5 years. After the orthodontic treatment, 376 surfaces with interproximal enamel reduction and 376 control surfaces within the same subjects were examined for 1 to 6 years for caries activity. The control surfaces and treated surfaces were examined every 6

2012 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

185. Fluoride releasing resin modified glass ionomers prevent caries around restoration within five years

, though the difference was not statistically significant. RMGI placed for a class II restoration did not affect the radiographic progression of caries at adjacent tooth surfaces when compared with non-fluoride releasing amalgam or composite restoration after 2 years (p ≤ .813). Evidence Search "Dental Caries"[Mesh] AND "Fluorides"[Mesh] AND "Dental Restoration, Permanent"[Mesh] AND resin modified glass ionomer Comments on The Evidence Qvist 2010 was a clinical study with the results based on clinical (...) effectively than non-fluoride releasing restorations over 5 years? Clinical Bottom Line (RMGI) restorations protected adjacent tooth surfaces from caries more than non-fluoride releasing restorations over five years. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Qvist/2010 1,341 tooth surfaces from 945 children RCT Key results After 5 years of restoration, 52%, 40%, 54% and 55% of healthy tooth surfaces

2012 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

186. Prevention of root caries. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prevention of root caries. Randomised controlled trial.Elders having at least five teeth with exposed roots, no serious medical problems and basic self-care ability (including oral hygiene practices) were randomly allocated into one of four prevention groups. Individualised oral hygiene instruction was provided to each participant, focusing on effective brushing with a manual toothbrush, and use of fluoride toothpaste was recommended. Before applications of the study agents, a piece of gauze (...) of water or SDF solution were repeated every 12 months, and applications of chlorhexidine varnish or sodium fluoride varnish were repeated every three months.Root Caries Index (RCI) was calculated as follows: (no. of root caries lesions/no. of teeth with gingival recession/person) × 100. Treatment effects were also measured by prevented fraction (PF), relative risk and the number (of elders) needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one elder from developing root caries.Two thirds (203/306) of the included

2011 Evidence-based dentistry Controlled trial quality: uncertain

187. Digital Radiography and Film Radiography are Similar in Accuracy of Detection of Dental Caries

Digital Radiography and Film Radiography are Similar in Accuracy of Detection of Dental Caries UTCAT2077, Found CAT view, CRITICALLY APPRAISED TOPICs University: | | ORAL HEALTH EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE PROGRAM View the CAT / Title Digital Radiography And Film Radiography Are Similar In Accuracy Of Detection Of Dental Caries Clinical Question How does digital dental radiography compare in terms of diagnostic accuracy to conventional film dental radiography in detecting dental caries? Clinical (...) Bottom Line Digital radiography and film radiography are similar in sensitivity and specificity for detection of dental caries. Best Evidence (you may view more info by clicking on the PubMed ID link) PubMed ID Author / Year Patient Group Study type (level of evidence) #1) Wenzel/2006 Human subjects and human lab specimens Systematic Review Key results Nine of the studies compared one or more digital receptors with film and most of them showed that digital receptors provided accuracy for proximal

2011 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

188. Early childhood caries in Indigenous communities

, management and microbiology of ECC in Indigenous communities would be beneficial. Key Words: American Indians; Dental caries; Early childhood caries; First Nations; Indigenous; Oral health (...) Early childhood caries in Indigenous communities The oral health of Indigenous children of Canada (First Nations, Inuit and Métis) and the United States (American Indian and Alaska Native) is a major child health issue. This is exemplified by the high prevalence of early childhood caries (ECC) with resulting adverse health effects, as well as high rates and costs of restorative and surgical treatments under general anesthesia. ECC is an infectious disease that is influenced by multiple

2011 CPG Infobase

189. Glass ionomer cement and resin-based fissure sealants are equally effective in caries prevention.

of GIC and resin-based fissure sealants on permanent teeth in the prevention of dental caries. The conclusion that both sealant materials are equally effective does not reflect the possible confounding effects of either the resin-based fissure sealant or the GIC fissure sealant used in a split-mouth design. Evidence Quality Rating Limited Evidence This summary is published in the Journal of the American Dental Association and can be accessed at: Critical Summary Publication Date: 5/12/2011 (...) Glass ionomer cement and resin-based fissure sealants are equally effective in caries prevention. Glass ionomer cement and resin-based fissure sealants are equally effective in caries prevention. ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all. Together. Take advantage of endorsed

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

190. Glass ionomer cement and resin-based fissure sealants are equally effective in caries prevention.

of GIC and resin-based fissure sealants on permanent teeth in the prevention of dental caries. The conclusion that both sealant materials are equally effective does not reflect the possible confounding effects of either the resin-based fissure sealant or the GIC fissure sealant used in a split-mouth design. Evidence Quality Rating Limited Evidence This summary is published in the Journal of the American Dental Association and can be accessed at: Critical Summary Publication Date: 5/12/2011 (...) Glass ionomer cement and resin-based fissure sealants are equally effective in caries prevention. Glass ionomer cement and resin-based fissure sealants are equally effective in caries prevention. ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all. Together. Take advantage of endorsed

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

191. Glass ionomer cement and resin-based fissure sealants are equally effective in caries prevention.

of GIC and resin-based fissure sealants on permanent teeth in the prevention of dental caries. The conclusion that both sealant materials are equally effective does not reflect the possible confounding effects of either the resin-based fissure sealant or the GIC fissure sealant used in a split-mouth design. Evidence Quality Rating Limited Evidence This summary is published in the Journal of the American Dental Association and can be accessed at: Critical Summary Publication Date: 5/12/2011 (...) Glass ionomer cement and resin-based fissure sealants are equally effective in caries prevention. Glass ionomer cement and resin-based fissure sealants are equally effective in caries prevention. ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all. Together. Take advantage of endorsed

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

192. Limited evidence supports the use of fluoride varnish for the prevention of dental caries in the primary dentition

Limited evidence supports the use of fluoride varnish for the prevention of dental caries in the primary dentition Limited evidence supports the use of fluoride varnish for the prevention of dental caries in the primary dentition ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all. Together (...) Topics Limited evidence supports the use of fluoride varnish for the prevention of dental caries in the primary dentition L. Virginia Powell DMD, GPR . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Fluoride varnish may reduce the incidence of caries in the primary teeth of children younger than 6 years of age, but the evidence is inconclusive. Critical Summary Assessment Even though the majority of clinical trials support the conclusion that fluoride varnishes effectively prevent dental caries in primary

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

193. Limited evidence supports the use of fluoride varnish for the prevention of dental caries in the primary dentition

Limited evidence supports the use of fluoride varnish for the prevention of dental caries in the primary dentition Limited evidence supports the use of fluoride varnish for the prevention of dental caries in the primary dentition ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all. Together (...) Topics Limited evidence supports the use of fluoride varnish for the prevention of dental caries in the primary dentition L. Virginia Powell DMD, GPR . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Fluoride varnish may reduce the incidence of caries in the primary teeth of children younger than 6 years of age, but the evidence is inconclusive. Critical Summary Assessment Even though the majority of clinical trials support the conclusion that fluoride varnishes effectively prevent dental caries in primary

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

194. Limited evidence supports the use of fluoride varnish for the prevention of dental caries in the primary dentition

Limited evidence supports the use of fluoride varnish for the prevention of dental caries in the primary dentition Limited evidence supports the use of fluoride varnish for the prevention of dental caries in the primary dentition ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all. Together (...) Topics Limited evidence supports the use of fluoride varnish for the prevention of dental caries in the primary dentition L. Virginia Powell DMD, GPR . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Fluoride varnish may reduce the incidence of caries in the primary teeth of children younger than 6 years of age, but the evidence is inconclusive. Critical Summary Assessment Even though the majority of clinical trials support the conclusion that fluoride varnishes effectively prevent dental caries in primary

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

195. Limited evidence suggests that silver diamine fluoride may effectively arrest and prevent dental caries in children

Limited evidence suggests that silver diamine fluoride may effectively arrest and prevent dental caries in children Limited evidence suggests that silver diamine fluoride may effectively arrest and prevent dental caries in children ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all. Together (...) Topics Limited evidence suggests that silver diamine fluoride may effectively arrest and prevent dental caries in children Donald L. Chi D.D.S., PhD . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) is more effective than, and as safe as, fluoride varnish in arresting and preventing dental caries. Critical Summary Assessment The results of two studies, only one of which was a nonrandomized study that directly compared silver diamine fluoride and fluoride varnish, suggest

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

196. Limited evidence suggests that silver diamine fluoride may effectively arrest and prevent dental caries in children

Limited evidence suggests that silver diamine fluoride may effectively arrest and prevent dental caries in children Limited evidence suggests that silver diamine fluoride may effectively arrest and prevent dental caries in children ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all. Together (...) Topics Limited evidence suggests that silver diamine fluoride may effectively arrest and prevent dental caries in children Donald L. Chi D.D.S., PhD . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) is more effective than, and as safe as, fluoride varnish in arresting and preventing dental caries. Critical Summary Assessment The results of two studies, only one of which was a nonrandomized study that directly compared silver diamine fluoride and fluoride varnish, suggest

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

197. Limited evidence suggests that silver diamine fluoride may effectively arrest and prevent dental caries in children

Limited evidence suggests that silver diamine fluoride may effectively arrest and prevent dental caries in children Limited evidence suggests that silver diamine fluoride may effectively arrest and prevent dental caries in children ADA Websites Access news, member benefits and ADA policy Attend ADA's premier event Access cutting-edge continuing education courses Find evidence to support your clinical decisions Access member-only practice content Investing in better oral health for all. Together (...) Topics Limited evidence suggests that silver diamine fluoride may effectively arrest and prevent dental caries in children Donald L. Chi D.D.S., PhD . Overview Systematic Review Conclusion Silver diamine fluoride (SDF) is more effective than, and as safe as, fluoride varnish in arresting and preventing dental caries. Critical Summary Assessment The results of two studies, only one of which was a nonrandomized study that directly compared silver diamine fluoride and fluoride varnish, suggest

2011 ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry

198. Non-fluoride agents for caries prevention

-health information for the public and ADA Find-A-Dentist Partnerships and Commissions Learn about ADA CERP recognition, look up CERP recognized CE providers and find CE courses. Explore CODA's role and find accredited schools and programs Learn about the examinations used in licensing dentists and dental hygienists Learn about recognized dental specialties and certifying boards Evidence Education EBD: Non-fluoride caries preventive agents Non-fluoride agents for caries prevention (2011) A panel (...) of experts convened by the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs presents evidence-based clinical practice guideline and systematic review on non-fluoride agents for caries prevention including sucrose-free polyol chewing gums, xylitol dentifrices, chlorhexidine, chlorhexidine in combination with thymol, calcium-containing agents, phosphate containing agents, casein derivatives, sialogogues, iodine and triclosan. The panel concluded that certain non-fluoride agents may provide

2011 American Dental Association Guidelines

199. Non-fluoride caries preventive agents: full report of a systematic review and evidence-based recommendations

K, Frantsve-Hawley J, Meyer DM, American Dental Association Council on Scientific Affairs Expert Panel on Nonfluoride Caries Preventive Agents CRD summary This review concluded that certain non-fluoride agents may provide some benefit as additional therapy for children and adults at high risk of developing caries. Despite some limitations to the review, the authors seemed to make suitable judgments about when to pool studies and when there was sufficient evidence to produce recommendations, so (...) extracted on the prevented fraction of caries (the difference in decayed, missing or filled surfaces – or teeth increment scores – between the treatment and control groups). The reviewers made a range of judgements on the priority of different types of data to be extracted, based on a Cochrane review (details reported). In studies that had more than one relevant treatment, data from the treatment groups were combined to calculate a mean treatment effect. Methods of synthesis Summary estimates

2011 DARE.

200. Caris Target Now? molecular profiling service for solid malignant tumours

Caris Target Now? molecular profiling service for solid malignant tumours Caris Target Now™ molecular profiling service for solid malignant tumours Caris Target Now™ molecular profiling service for solid malignant tumours NHSC Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation NHSC. Caris Target Now™ molecular profiling service for solid

2011 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.