Latest & greatest articles for cardiac arrest

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Top results for cardiac arrest

81. Treatment of a patient with acute aortic dissection using extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation after an out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest: a case report Full Text available with Trip Pro

Treatment of a patient with acute aortic dissection using extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation after an out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest: a case report Circulatory support using veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for aortic disease is conventionally contraindicated. In this case, a 66-year-old man experienced cardiopulmonary arrest caused by acute aortic dissection. When exercising in the gym, he experienced chest discomfort, so the staff immediately called an ambulance (...) . While in the ambulance, he experienced cardiopulmonary arrest. His initial electrocardiogram showed ventricular fibrillation. At the emergency department, we immediately performed extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We suspected acute coronary syndrome, so coronary angiography was carried out. Enlargement of ascending aorta was noted. Whole-body enhanced computed tomography was subsequently performed, leading to a final diagnosis of acute aortic dissection.Emergency ascending aorta

2017 Acute medicine & surgery

82. Case Report: Toxin-Induced Cardiac Arrest in Game of Thrones Full Text available with Trip Pro

Case Report: Toxin-Induced Cardiac Arrest in Game of Thrones Case Report: Toxin-Induced Cardiac Arrest in Game of Thrones - CanadiEM Case Report: Toxin-Induced Cardiac Arrest in Game of Thrones In , by Will Wu December 12, 2017 King Joffrey I Baratheon was found in respiratory distress by his mother, Cersei Lannister, and Jaime Lannister during his wedding to Margaery Tyrell. As this was the wedding for the King of the Seven Kingdoms, numerous guests and bystanders were present. The patient (...) the specific management strategies of toxin-induced cardiac arrest and why we believe the resuscitative attempt (or lack thereof) for Joffrey demonstrated in this case was poor, even for a peasant, let alone the King of the Seven Kingdoms. He would have benefited from receiving proper supportive care with support from a Maester at King’s Landing and from emergency consultation with a Maester with expertise in posions. While the epidemiology of toxin-induced cardiac arrest (TICA) is understudied

2017 CandiEM

83. Prehospital cooling to improve successful targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest: A randomized controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prehospital cooling to improve successful targeted temperature management after cardiac arrest: A randomized controlled trial Targeted temperature management (TTM) improves survival with good neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), but is delivered inconsistently and often with delay.To determine if prehospital cooling by paramedics leads to higher rates of 'successful TTM', defined as achieving a target temperature of 32-34°C within 6h of hospital arrival.Pragmatic (...) RCT comparing prehospital cooling (surface ice packs, cold saline infusion, wristband reminders) initiated 5min after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) versus usual resuscitation and transport. The primary outcome was rate of 'successful TTM'; secondary outcomes were rates of applying TTM in hospital, survival with good neurological outcome, pulmonary edema in emergency department, and re-arrest during transport.585 patients were randomized to receive prehospital cooling (n=279) or control

2017 EvidenceUpdates

84. A user-friendly risk-score for predicting in-hospital cardiac arrest among patients admitted with suspected non ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome - The SAFER-score Full Text available with Trip Pro

A user-friendly risk-score for predicting in-hospital cardiac arrest among patients admitted with suspected non ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome - The SAFER-score To develop a simple risk-score model for predicting in-hospital cardiac arrest (CA) among patients hospitalized with suspected non-ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS).Using the Swedish Web-system for Enhancement and Development of Evidence-based care in Heart disease Evaluated According to Recommended Therapies (...) of in-hospital CA for NSTE-ACS and non-ACS was lower in the SWEDEHEART-derivation cohort than in MINAP (1.3% and 0.5% vs. 2.3% and 2.3%). A seven point, five variable risk score (age ≥60 years (1 point), ST-T abnormalities (2 points), Killip Class >1 (1 point), heart rate <50 or ≥100bpm (1 point), and systolic blood pressure <100mmHg (2 points) was developed. Model discrimination was good in the derivation cohort (c-statistic 0.72) and temporal validation cohort (c-statistic 0.74), and calibration

2017 EvidenceUpdates

85. Targeted Temperature Management for 48 vs 24 Hours and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Targeted Temperature Management for 48 vs 24 Hours and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Clinical Trial PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2017 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

86. Sudden Cardiac Arrest during Participation in Competitive Sports. Full Text available with Trip Pro

, the incidence of sudden cardiac arrest during participation in competitive sports was 0.76 cases per 100,000 athlete-years. The occurrence of sudden cardiac arrest due to structural heart disease was uncommon during participation in competitive sports. (Funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and others.). (...) Sudden Cardiac Arrest during Participation in Competitive Sports. The incidence of sudden cardiac arrest during participation in sports activities remains unknown. Preparticipation screening programs aimed at preventing sudden cardiac arrest during sports activities are thought to be able to identify at-risk athletes; however, the efficacy of these programs remains controversial. We sought to identify all sudden cardiac arrests that occurred during participation in sports activities within

2017 NEJM

87. Association of Public Health Initiatives With Outcomes for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest at Home and in Public Locations Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association of Public Health Initiatives With Outcomes for Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest at Home and in Public Locations Little is known about the influence of comprehensive public health initiatives according to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) location, particularly at home, where resuscitation efforts and outcomes have historically been poor.To describe temporal trends in bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and first-responder defibrillation for OHCAs stratified by home vs (...) public location and their association with survival and neurological outcomes.This observational study reviewed 8269 patients with OHCAs (5602 [67.7%] at home and 2667 [32.3%] in public) for whom resuscitation was attempted using data from the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) from January 1, 2010, through December 31, 2014. The setting was 16 counties in North Carolina.Patients were stratified by home vs public OHCA. Public health initiatives to improve bystander and first

2017 JAMA cardiology

88. Continuous versus intermittent neuromuscular blockade in patients during targeted temperature management after resuscitation from cardiac arrest-A randomized, double blinded, double dummy, clinical trial (Abstract)

Continuous versus intermittent neuromuscular blockade in patients during targeted temperature management after resuscitation from cardiac arrest-A randomized, double blinded, double dummy, clinical trial Current guidelines recommend targeted temperature management to improve neurological outcome after cardiac arrest. Evidence regarding an ideal sedative/analgesic regimen including skeletal muscle paralysis is limited.Patients were randomized to either a continuous administration of rocuronium (...) (continuous-NMB-group) or to a continuous administration of saline supplemented by rocuronium bolus administration if demanded (bolus-NMB-group). The primary outcome was the number of shivering episodes. Secondary outcomes included survival and neurological status one year after cardiac arrest, time to awakening, length of stay as well as required cumulative dose of rocuronium, midazolam and fentanyl.Sixty-three patients (32 continuous-NMB-group; 31 bolus-NMB-group) were enrolled. Differences in baseline

2017 EvidenceUpdates

89. Hypothermia or normothermia to improve survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest?

in neurobehavioural functioning at 1 year. Conclusion: in comatose children that survived in-hospital cardiac arrest, therapeutic hypothermia did not confer a significant benefit with respect to survival with a good functional outcome at 1 year compared with therapeutic normothermia. Conflicts of interest: several authors disclosed having receiving funds during the study. Funding sources: grants from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and other institutions Critical Commentary Justification: based (...) Hypothermia or normothermia to improve survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest? Hypothermia or normothermia to improve survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest? - Evidencias en pediatría Searching, please wait Show menu Library Management You did not add any article to your library yet. | Search Evidence-Based decision making Evidence-Based decision making Show menu Library Management You did not add any article to your library yet. × User Password Log in × Reset password If you need

2017 Evidencias en Pediatría

90. Reliability of Administrative Codes for Capturing In-hospital Cardiac Arrest Full Text available with Trip Pro

Reliability of Administrative Codes for Capturing In-hospital Cardiac Arrest 28877294 2018 11 13 2380-6591 2 11 2017 Nov 01 JAMA cardiology JAMA Cardiol Administrative Codes for Capturing In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. 1275-1277 10.1001/jamacardio.2017.2904 Khera Rohan R Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. Spertus John A JA Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, Missouri. Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine (...) , University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City. Starks Monique A MA Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina. Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, North Carolina. Tang Yuanyuan Y Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, Missouri. Bradley Steven M SM Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Girotra Saket S Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City. Chan Paul S PS

2017 JAMA cardiology

91. Association of Neighborhood Demographics With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Treatment and Outcomes: Where You Live May Matter Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association of Neighborhood Demographics With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Treatment and Outcomes: Where You Live May Matter We examined whether resuscitation care and outcomes vary by the racial composition of the neighborhood where out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) occur.To evaluate the association between bystander treatments (cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automatic external defibrillation) and timing of emergency medical services personnel on OHCA outcomes according (...) nonsignificant association between racial composition in a neighborhood and survival.Those with OHCA in predominantly black neighborhoods had the lowest rates of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automatic external defibrillation use and significantly lower likelihood for survival compared with predominantly white neighborhoods. Improving bystander treatments in these neighborhoods may improve cardiac arrest survival.

2017 JAMA cardiology

92. Sudden cardiac arrest in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with dynamic cavity obstruction: The case for a decatecholaminisation strategy Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sudden cardiac arrest in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with dynamic cavity obstruction: The case for a decatecholaminisation strategy Catecholamines are entrenched in the management of shock states. A paradigm shift has pervaded the critical care arena in recent years acknowledging their propensity to cause harm and fuel a 'death-spiral'. We present the case of a 21-year-old male following a witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who received high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation

2017 Journal of the Intensive Care Society

93. Temporal Changes in the Racial Gap in Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Full Text available with Trip Pro

Temporal Changes in the Racial Gap in Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Previous studies have found marked differences in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest by race. Whether racial differences in survival have narrowed as overall survival has improved remains unknown.To examine whether racial differences in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest have narrowed over time and if such differences could be explained by acute resuscitation survival, postresuscitation survival (...) , and/or greater temporal improvement in survival at hospitals with higher proportions of black patients.In this cohort study from Get With the Guidelines-Resuscitation, performed from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2014, a total of 112 139 patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest who were hospitalized in intensive care units or general inpatient units were studied. Data analysis was performed from April 7, 2015, to May 24, 2017.Race (black or white).The primary outcome was survival to discharge

2017 JAMA cardiology

94. Death and Cardiac Arrest in U.S. Triathlon Participants, 1985 to 2016: A Case Series. (Abstract)

participants). At autopsy, 27 of 61 decedents (44%) had clinically relevant cardiovascular abnormalities, most frequently atherosclerotic coronary disease or cardiomyopathy.Case identification may be incomplete and may underestimate events, particularly in the early study period. In addition, prerace medical history is unknown in most cases.Deaths and cardiac arrests during the triathlon are not rare; most have occurred in middle-aged and older men. Most sudden deaths in triathletes happened during (...) Death and Cardiac Arrest in U.S. Triathlon Participants, 1985 to 2016: A Case Series. Reports of race-related triathlon fatalities have raised questions regarding athlete safety.To describe death and cardiac arrest among triathlon participants.Case series.United States.Participants in U.S. triathlon races from 1985 to 2016.Data on deaths and cardiac arrests were assembled from such sources as the U.S. National Registry of Sudden Death in Athletes (which uses news media, Internet searches

2017 Annals of Internal Medicine

95. Perimortem cesarean delivery and subsequent emergency hysterectomy: new strategy for maternal cardiac arrest Full Text available with Trip Pro

Perimortem cesarean delivery and subsequent emergency hysterectomy: new strategy for maternal cardiac arrest Perimortem cesarean delivery (PMCD) is the only way to resuscitate pregnant women in cardiac arrest, and has been found to increase maternal resuscitation rate by increasing circulating plasma volume. However, many obstetricians have not experienced a case of PMCD, as situations requiring it are rare. We report our strategy for cases of maternal cardiac arrest, on the basis of a review

2017 Acute medicine & surgery

96. My Heart Goes Boom… ß-Blockers in Cardiac Arrest

My Heart Goes Boom… ß-Blockers in Cardiac Arrest My Heart Goes Boom… ß-Blockers in Cardiac Arrest - CanadiEM My Heart Goes Boom… ß-Blockers in Cardiac Arrest In , by Sameer Sharif August 15, 2017 A 52-year-old male presents with chest pain. He arrests upon arrival to the Emergency Department and is found to be in ventricular fibrillation. You provide good CPR and defibrillate the patient, and treat him with doses of epinephrine and amiodarone in keeping with the ACLS algorithms. The patient (...) of Ventricular Fibrillation in Cardiac Arrest Ventricular fibrillation (VF) is the most common arrhythmia associated with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. 1 Myocardial oxygen consumption increases more than 4-fold in ventricular fibrillation relative to rest. 2 Furthermore, during cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), coronary blood flow may be reduced to levels as low as 20-40% of resting values. 3 Epinephrine has been a longstanding treatment for these patients, however, the literature has

2017 CandiEM

97. Effectiveness of dispatcher training in increasing bystander chest compression for out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest patients in Japan Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effectiveness of dispatcher training in increasing bystander chest compression for out‐of‐hospital cardiac arrest patients in Japan The Japanese government has developed a standardized training program for emergency call dispatchers to improve their skills in providing oral guidance on chest compression to bystanders who have witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs). This study evaluated the effects of such a training program for emergency call dispatchers in Japan.The analysis

2017 Acute medicine & surgery

98. Efficacy and Safety of Combination Therapy of Shenfu Injection and Postresuscitation Bundle in Patients With Return of Spontaneous Circulation After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized, Assessor-Blinded, Controlled Trial (Abstract)

Efficacy and Safety of Combination Therapy of Shenfu Injection and Postresuscitation Bundle in Patients With Return of Spontaneous Circulation After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized, Assessor-Blinded, Controlled Trial Postresuscitation care bundle treatment after return of spontaneous circulation in patients experiencing in-hospital cardiac arrest can improve patients' survival and quality of life. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combined therapy (...) of Shenfu injection and postresuscitation care bundle in these patients.Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study.Fifty hospitals in China.Adult patients had experienced in-hospital cardiac arrest between 2012 and 2015.Based on the standardized postresuscitation care bundle treatment, patients were randomized to a Shenfu injection group (Shenfu injection + postresuscitation care bundle) or control group (postresuscitation care bundle) for 14 days or until hospital discharge. In the Shenfu

2017 EvidenceUpdates

99. Targeted Temperature Management for 48 vs 24 Hours and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Targeted Temperature Management for 48 vs 24 Hours and Neurologic Outcome After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: A Randomized Clinical Trial. International resuscitation guidelines recommend targeted temperature management (TTM) at 33°C to 36°C in unconscious patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest for at least 24 hours, but the optimal duration of TTM is uncertain.To determine whether TTM at 33°C for 48 hours results in better neurologic outcomes compared with currently recommended (...) , standard, 24-hour TTM.This was an international, investigator-initiated, blinded-outcome-assessor, parallel, pragmatic, multicenter, randomized clinical superiority trial in 10 intensive care units (ICUs) at 10 university hospitals in 6 European countries. Three hundred fifty-five adult, unconscious patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest were enrolled from February 16, 2013, to June 1, 2016, with final follow-up on December 27, 2016.Patients were randomized to TTM (33 ± 1°C) for 48 hours (n = 176

2017 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

100. Time to Delivery of an Automated External Defibrillator Using a Drone for Simulated Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests vs Emergency Medical Services Full Text available with Trip Pro

Time to Delivery of an Automated External Defibrillator Using a Drone for Simulated Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests vs Emergency Medical Services 28609525 2017 07 06 2018 11 13 1538-3598 317 22 2017 06 13 JAMA JAMA Time to Delivery of an Automated External Defibrillator Using a Drone for Simulated Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests vs Emergency Medical Services. 2332-2334 10.1001/jama.2017.3957 Claesson Andreas A Center for Resuscitation Science, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Bäckman (...) , Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. eng Comparative Study Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't United States JAMA 7501160 0098-7484 AIM IM Med Klin Intensivmed Notfmed. 2018 Mar;113(2):141-142 29051969 Aircraft statistics & numerical data Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Defibrillators statistics & numerical data supply & distribution Electric Countershock instrumentation Emergency Medical Services statistics & numerical data Geographic Information Systems Humans Out-of-Hospital Cardiac

2017 JAMA