Latest & greatest articles for cannabis

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Top results for cannabis

1. Counselling adolescents and parents about cannabis: A primer for health professionals

Counselling adolescents and parents about cannabis: A primer for health professionals While cannabis use among adolescents is frequent in Canada, youth do recognize the potential harms, and increasingly expect knowledgeable health care providers to discuss substance use in everyday practice. This practice point provides sound, evidence-based tools to help health professionals address non-medical (recreational) cannabis use and its related risks. After highlighting how to make the clinical (...) setting a safe space for youth to talk about psychoactive substances, specific strategies for approaching cannabis use in effective, developmentally appropriate ways are described. Consistent with current literature, screening questionnaires to help structure discussion and identify adolescents who may benefit from more specialized interventions are recommended. Because one in six adolescents who experiments with cannabis goes on to misuse it, appraising their willingness to change risky behaviours

2020 Canadian Paediatric Society

2. COVID-19 and Cannabis Smoking and Vaping: Four Things You Should Know

on the lung and immune defenses. In ElSohly (ed.), Marijuana and the Cannabinoids, pp. 253–275. Totowa, New Jersey: Humana Press. Taylor, D. R., Poulton, R., Moffit, T. E., Ramankutty, P., & Sears, M. R. (2000). The respiratory effects of cannabis dependence in young adults. Addiction, 95(11), 1669–1677. Tetrault, J. M., Crothers, K., Moore, B. A., Mehra, R., Concato, J., & Fiellin, D. A. (2007). Effects of marijuana smoking on pulmonary function and respiratory complications: A systematic review (...) Group: https://www.cannabisrehab.org/ Cannabis Resources • Canadian Institute for Substance Use Research, Safer Cannabis Use: https://www.heretohelp.bc.ca/infosheet/safer-cannabis-use-marijuana-hash-hash-oil • Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Canada’s Lower-Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines: https://www.camh.ca/-/media/files/pdfs---reports-and-books---research/canadas-lower-risk- guidelines-cannabis-pdf.pdf • Government of Canada, Cannabis in Canada: Get the facts: https://www.canada.ca/en

2020 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

3. Use of cannabinoids in cancer patients

f , x W. Burke Affiliations Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, NY, USA c DOI: | Publication History Published online: January 13, 2020 Accepted: December 11, 2019 ; Received: October 24, 2019 ; To view the full text, please login as a subscribed user or . Click to view the full text on ScienceDirect. Highlights • Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) affect the human endocannabinoid system. • Cannabinoids reduce chemotherapy induced nausea or vomiting (CINV (...) ) and neuropathic pain. • Each state has its own regulations for medical and recreational cannabis use. • Effects of cannabinoids on chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and tumor growth remain under investigation. • Providers should focus indications, alternatives, risks and benefits of medical cannabis use to make appropriate referrals. Keywords: , , , , , To access this article, please choose from the options below Log In Register Purchase access to this article Claim Access If you are a current subscriber

2020 Society of Gynecologic Oncology

4. Canadian Cardiovascular Society Position Statement on Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) and Related Disorders of Chronic Orthostatic Intolerance Full Text available with Trip Pro

Canadian Cardiovascular Society Position Statement on Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) and Related Disorders of Chronic Orthostatic Intolerance Canadian Cardiovascular Society Position Statement on Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) and Related Disorders of Chronic Orthostatic Intolerance - Canadian Journal of Cardiology Go search , P357-372, March 01, 2020 Powered By Mendeley Share on Canadian Cardiovascular Society Position Statement on Postural Orthostatic (...) Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) and Related Disorders of Chronic Orthostatic Intolerance Satish R. Raj Correspondence Corresponding author: Dr Satish R. Raj, GAC70 HRIC Building, University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4Z6, Canada. Tel.: +1-403-210-6152; fax: +1-403-210-9444. Affiliations Department of Cardiac Sciences, Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada Juan C. Guzman Affiliations Department of Medicine, McMaster University

2020 Canadian Cardiovascular Society

5. Canadian guidelines on cannabis use disorder among older adults

of Canada. Health Canada. Information for Health Care Professionals: Cannabis (marihuana, marijuana) and the Cannabinoids. Ottawa, ON: Health Canada; 2018. Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/ hc-sc/documents/services/drugs-medication/cannabis/ information-medical-practitioners/information-health- care-professionals-cannabis-cannabinoids-eng.pdf 13. Hackam DG. Cannabis and stroke: systematic appraisal of case reports. Stroke. 2015;46(3):852–56. 14. Hemachandra D, McKetin R, Cherbuin N, et (...) withdrawal symptoms in older adults, as well as the presentation of can- nabis hyperemesis syndrome. (9) Cannabis is a plant that contains hundreds of com- pounds, including cannabinoids which act on the endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid) system. Certain cannabi- noids act by influencing reward, motivation, and substance- related cues. Notably, delta-9-tetrahydro-cannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are two cannabinoids that have been studied the most. They exert various effects by binding

2020 CPG Infobase

6. Cannabis Use During Pregnancy and Lactation: A Practice Resources for Health Care Providers

) was enacted, establishing a framework for the possession, distribution, sale and production of cannabis in Canada. (5) Cannabis is defined in the Act to include marijuana, hashish, hash oil or any other preparation of the cannabis plant. (5) In 2016, 16.9% of Canadian women between the ages of 15-44 reported past year use of cannabis which was an increase from the self reported 12.6% in 2015. (6) In British Columbia (BC), approximately 3.5% of pregnant women and individuals reported cannabis use (...) -on-Obstetric-Practice/Marijuana- Use-During-Pregnancy-and-Lactation?IsMobileSet=false n Midwives Association of British Columbia. Is it safe to use weed during pregnancy? https://www.bcmidwives.com/cgi/page.cgi/_zine.html/News_Announcements/Is_it_ safe_to_use_weed_during_pregnancy_ n Canadian Association of Midwives. Cannabis Use during Pregnancy. https:// canadianmidwives.org/2018/10/15/cannabis-use-during-pregnancy/ n Champlain Maternal Newborn Regional Program (CMNRP). Cannabis and Lactation Discussion

2020 British Columbia Perinatal Health Program

7. Cannabis and Your Medications

Cannabis and Your Medications Cannabis can interact with your medications and affect your health. For more information, talk to your healthcare provider. Medications that can interact with cannabis PAIN medications HEART medications and BLOOD THINNERS SLEEPING PILLS ANTI-SEIZURE medications ANTI- DEPRESSANTS and ANTI-ANXIETY medications ANTIBIOTIC and ANTIFUNGAL medications ADHD medications Drugs to treat HIV/AIDS ALLERGY medications COLD and FLU medications HEARTBURN medications Learn about (...) the health effects of cannabis at ccsa.ca/cannabis and canada.ca/cannabis Cannabis and Your Medication © Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction 2020

2020 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

8. Cannabis and Other Substances

Cannabis and Other Substances Cannabis and Other Substances Learn about the health effects of cannabis at ccsa.ca/cannabis and canada.ca/cannabis Using cannabis with alcohol can increase your risk of over-intoxication and impair your ability to drive safely. Smoking cannabis with tobacco increases exposure to chemicals that can further your risk of developing lung and heart disease. Using cannabis with drugs (e.g., MDMA, cocaine, opioids, heroin, etc.) can lead to interactions that can (...) be dangerous to your health. © Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction 2020 Cannabis used with other substances can lead to negative impacts on your health. Using cannabis with tobacco can increase the risk for dependence on these substances more than smoking either one alone. If you choose to use cannabis, be aware of the risks of mixing with other substances. TOBACCO OTHER ALCOHOL

2020 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

9. Position Statement on the medicinal use of Cannabinoids in Pain Medicine

Position Statement on the medicinal use of Cannabinoids in Pain Medicine Faculty Position Statement on the medicinal use of Cannabinoids in Pain Medicine Update following the publication of NICE Guidance NG144 (11 November 2019) This statement is focused on the issues relating to cannabis derived medicinal products in relation to Pain Medicine. It does not comment on other areas of medical practice or recreational use, which lie outside our remit. The issue of cannabis, its extracts (...) , Radbruch L, Petzke F, Häuser W. Cannabis-based medicines for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2018, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD012182. DOI: 10.1002 /14651858.CD012182.pub2 3. Stockings E, Campbell G, Hall WD, Nielsen S, Zagic D, Rahman R, et al. Cannabis and cannabinoids for the treatment of people with chronic non-cancer pain conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled and observational studies. PAIN. 2018;159(10):1932-54. 4. National Academies

2020 Faculty of Pain Medicine

10. Herbal cannabis and pharmaceutical cannabinoid treatment following motor vehicle accidents: A state of the science review

recommendation) — Nabilone is off-label for pain and has limited evidence of benefit. However, it is less expensive than nabiximols and dosing is more consistent than for smoked cannabis — Nabiximols is expensive and, in some provinces, only available through specialist prescribing or special authorization. However, nabiximols has better evidence than nabilone does -If considering medical cannabinoids, we recommend against medical marijuana (particularly smoked) as the initial product (strong recommendation (...) Herbal cannabis and pharmaceutical cannabinoid treatment following motor vehicle accidents: A state of the science review Herbal cannabis and pharmaceutical cannabinoid treatment following motor vehicle accidents: A state of the science review Final Report Carolyn J Green, PhD Ken L Bassett, MD, PhD Therapeutics Initiative University of British Columbia October 2018 Table of Contents 1.0 Developing a funding policy framework for ICBC insurance claims 1 1.1 Scientific medical knowledge

2020 Therapeutics Letter

11. Cannabis-based medicinal products

technology appraisal guidance on cannabidiol with clobazam for treating seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome. Products covered by the guideline include: cannabis-based products for medicinal use as set out by the UK Government in the 2018 Regulations the licensed products delta-9-tetrahydrocannibinol combined with cannabidiol (Sativex) and nabilone plant-derived cannabinoids such as pure cannabidiol (CBD) synthetic compounds which are identical in structure to naturally (...) occurring cannabinoids such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), for example, dronabinol. Who is it for? Who is it for? Healthcare professionals People taking cannabis-based medicinal products, their families and carers Cannabis-based medicinal products (NG144) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 4 of 27Recommendations Recommendations People have the right to be involved in discussions and make informed

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

12. Barriers to accessing cannabis-based products for medicinal use on NHS prescription

Barriers to accessing cannabis-based products for medicinal use on NHS prescription NHS England » Barriers to accessing cannabis-based products for medicinal use on NHS prescription Search Search Menu Barriers to accessing cannabis-based products for medicinal use on NHS prescription Document first published: 8 August 2019 Page updated: 8 August 2019 Topic: Publication type: This document provides information on the findings and recommendations following NHS England and NHS Improvement’s review (...) of the barriers to prescribing of cannabis-based products for medicinal use. Document PDF 290 KB 20 pages

2019 NHS England

13. Public health implications of legalising the production and sale of cannabis for medicinal and recreational use. (Abstract)

Public health implications of legalising the production and sale of cannabis for medicinal and recreational use. We assess the current and describe possible future public health impacts of the legalisation of cannabis production, sale, and use in the Americas. First, we describe global patterns of cannabis use and their most probable adverse health effects. Second, we summarise evidence regarding the effectiveness of cannabinoids for medicinal use and describe approaches that have been used (...) to regulate the use of medicinal cannabis and how these approaches might have affected medicinal and recreational use and harms (eg, road crashes). Third, we describe how jurisdictions that have legalised recreational use have regulated production and sale of cannabis. Fourth, we evaluate the effects of cannabis legalisation on cannabis use and harms and on the use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs. Fifth, we use alcohol and tobacco policy examples to identify possible long-term public health effects

2019 Lancet

14. Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Dementia: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

of cannabinoids in the treatment of dementia. Sources of uncertainty included the low quality of evidence in the primary studies of the systematic review3 and the fact that the uncontrolled before-and-after study10 was a nonrandomized pilot study in 10 dementia patients that reported descriptive outcomes without statistical analysis. No relevant evidence-based clinical guidelines regarding the use of medical cannabis for treating dementia were identified. Files Rapid Response Summary with Critical Appraisal (...) Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Dementia: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Dementia: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Dementia: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Dementia: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Last updated: July 17, 2019 Project Number: RC1152-000 Product

2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

15. Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Chronic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Chronic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Chronic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Chronic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis for the Treatment of Chronic Pain: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Last updated: July 24, 2019 Project Number: RC1153 (...) -000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of medical cannabis for the treatment of chronic pain? What are the evidence-based guidelines associated with the use of medical cannabis for the treatment of chronic pain? Key Message Based on four overviews (with overlapping systematic reviews), and one systematic review of guidelines,8 there is some suggestion of benefit with cannabis-based medicines

2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

16. Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products

Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products | Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction Search the CCSA website Search Substances and Addiction SPOTLIGHT Health and Public Safety SPOTLIGHT People and Communities SPOTLIGHT Data Trends SPOTLIGHT About Us SPOTLIGHT Menu Search the CCSA website Search Substances and Addiction SPOTLIGHT Health (...) and Public Safety SPOTLIGHT People and Communities SPOTLIGHT Data Trends SPOTLIGHT About Us SPOTLIGHT Breadcrumb Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products Share Topic Summary Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products Publication date: 2019 Author: Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction Provides an overview of edible cannabis products, cannabis extracts and topical cannabis products

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

17. Cannabis: Inhaling vs Ingesting

Cannabis: Inhaling vs Ingesting Cannabis: Inhaling vs Ingesting INHALING — smoking or vaping — INGESTING — eating or drinking — Cannabis smoke or vapour delivers THC, the chemical that gets you high, into your lungs where it passes directly into your bloodstream and then your brain. Edible cannabis travels first to your stomach then to your liver before getting into your bloodstream and brain. The liver converts THC into a stronger form and this combined with the THC from the original product (...) adds to the intensity of the high. To lower your risk of the harmful effects of cannabis, you need to understand the differences between the two most common ways of consuming it. To learn more visit ccsa.ca/cannabis | canada.ca/cannabis TIPS FOR LOWER-RISK USE START OF EFFECTS PEAK EFFECTS LENGTH OF EFFECTS • Ingesting and vaping are less harmful to your lungs than smoking. • If you are new to edible cannabis or cannabis, start low by consuming an edible cannabis product with no more than 2.5 mg

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

18. Understanding the Health Effects of Recreational Cannabis Use: A Focused Practice Question

. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (2017): The health effects of cannabis and cannabinoids: The current state of evidence and recommendations for research. 4 This strong-quality review of reviews examined the health consequences of using cannabis or its constituents. It provided recommendations on the most critical research questions to be answered in the short- and long-term, and what is required to address those questions. The report was not intended to be a systematic review (...) Understanding the Health Effects of Recreational Cannabis Use: A Focused Practice Question Understanding the Health Effects of Recreational Cannabis Use A Focused Practice Question Region of Peel – Public Health Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention Division & Family Health Division August 2019 Please use the following citation when referencing this document: Region of Peel – Public Health. Understanding the health effects of recreational cannabis use: A focused practice question. Mississauga

2019 Peel Health Library

19. Know the Health Effects of Cannabis

Know the Health Effects of Cannabis Mental Health Daily or near-daily use of cannabis can contribute to dependence and mental health problems over time. Know the Health Risks of Cannabis Driving Cannabis can impair your motor coordination, judgment and other skills required for safe driving. Respiratory Effects Toxic and carcinogenic chemicals found in tobacco smoke are also found in cannabis smoke, and can affect the lungs and airways. Pregnancy Substances in cannabis are transferred from (...) mother to child and can affect your baby. Not using cannabis if pregnant or breastfeeding is the safest option. Stay Informed ccsa.ca/cannabis canada.ca/cannabis Edible Cannabis Consuming too much THC can lead to over-intoxication, which includes intense anxiety, vomiting and symptoms of psychosis (paranoia). Cannabis Extracts Cannabis extracts with high THC content increase the risk of over- intoxication and addiction.

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

20. Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products

cannabinoid pharmacokinetics. Chemistry and Biodiversity, 4(8), 1770–1804. 4. Grotenhermen, F. (2003). Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of cannabinoids. Clinical Pharmacokinetics, 42(4), 327–360. 5. Berger, E. (2014). Legal marijuana and pediatric exposure: Pot edibles implicated in spike in child emergency department visits. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 64(4), A19–A21. 6. Potera, C. (2015). Kids and marijuana edibles: A worrisome trend emerges. American Journal of Nursing, 115(9), 15. 7. Alzghari (...) Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products www.ccsa.ca • www.ccdus.ca Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction • Centre canadien sur les dépendances et l’usage de substances Page 1 Edible Cannabis, Cannabis Extracts and Cannabis Topicals: A Primer on the New Cannabis Products Edible Cannabis (or Edibles) Edible cannabis (or edibles for short) are products containing cannabinoids that you eat or drink. Cannabinoids are chemical compounds

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse