Latest & greatest articles for breast cancer screening

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Top results for breast cancer screening

161. Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations: a simulation study

in life-years, per 1,000 women screened. Outcomes assessed in the review The outcomes assessed from the literature were: the sensitivity and specificity of mammography for women younger and older than 50 years; the median tumour volume doubling time for women younger and older than 50 years; the breast cancer induction risk due to mammography radiation for women younger and older than 50 years; the relative risk of dying from breast cancer for women aged 30 to 50 years, compared with women above (...) the results of the review with their own assumptions, which were supported with findings from the literature. Estimates of effectiveness and key assumptions The authors made the following assumptions. Screening caused a shift to finding tumours at early stages. This led to a 50% better survival rate among women with screen-detected breast cancer compared with clinically detected tumours. Women with a familial predisposition for breast cancer were at a higher risk of radiation-induced cancer than women

2006 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

162. Diagnostic performance of digital versus film mammography for breast-cancer screening. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Diagnostic performance of digital versus film mammography for breast-cancer screening. Film mammography has limited sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer in women with radiographically dense breasts. We assessed whether the use of digital mammography would avoid some of these limitations.A total of 49,528 asymptomatic women presenting for screening mammography at 33 sites in the United States and Canada underwent both digital and film mammography. All relevant information was available (...) women (difference, 0.15; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.05 to 0.24; P=0.002).The overall diagnostic accuracy of digital and film mammography as a means of screening for breast cancer is similar, but digital mammography is more accurate in women under the age of 50 years, women with radiographically dense breasts, and premenopausal or perimenopausal women. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00008346.)Copyright 2005 Massachusetts Medical Society.

2005 NEJM

163. Effect of screening and adjuvant therapy on mortality from breast cancer. (Abstract)

Effect of screening and adjuvant therapy on mortality from breast cancer. We used modeling techniques to assess the relative and absolute contributions of screening mammography and adjuvant treatment to the reduction in breast-cancer mortality in the United States from 1975 to 2000.A consortium of investigators developed seven independent statistical models of breast-cancer incidence and mortality. All seven groups used the same sources to obtain data on the use of screening mammography (...) , adjuvant treatment, and benefits of treatment with respect to the rate of death from breast cancer.The proportion of the total reduction in the rate of death from breast cancer attributed to screening varied in the seven models from 28 to 65 percent (median, 46 percent), with adjuvant treatment contributing the rest. The variability across models in the absolute contribution of screening was larger than it was for treatment, reflecting the greater uncertainty associated with estimating the benefit

2005 NEJM

164. Screening for breast cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Screening for breast cancer. Breast cancer screening in community practices may be different from that in randomized controlled trials. New screening modalities are becoming available.To review breast cancer screening, especially in the community and to examine evidence about new screening modalities.English-language articles of randomized controlled trials assessing effectiveness of breast cancer screening were reviewed, as well as meta-analyses, systematic reviews, studies of breast cancer (...) screening in the community, and guidelines. Also, studies of newer screening modalities were assessed.All major US medical organizations recommend screening mammography for women aged 40 years and older. Screening mammography reduces breast cancer mortality by about 20% to 35% in women aged 50 to 69 years and slightly less in women aged 40 to 49 years at 14 years of follow-up. Approximately 95% of women with abnormalities on screening mammograms do not have breast cancer with variability based

2005 JAMA

165. Breast cancer mortality in Copenhagen after introduction of mammography screening: cohort study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Breast cancer mortality in Copenhagen after introduction of mammography screening: cohort study. To evaluate the effect on breast cancer mortality during the first 10 years of the mammography service screening programme that was introduced in Copenhagen in 1991.Cohort study.The mammography service screening programme in Copenhagen, Denmark.All women ever invited to mammography screening in the first 10 years of the programme. Historical, national, and historical national control groups were (...) used.The main outcome measure was breast cancer mortality. We compared breast cancer mortality in the study group with rates in the control groups, adjusting for age, time period, and region.Breast cancer mortality in the screening period was reduced by 25% (relative risk 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.63 to 0.89) compared with what we would expect in the absence of screening. For women actually participating in screening, breast cancer mortality was reduced by 37%.In the Copenhagen programme, breast

2005 BMJ

166. A model-based comparison of breast cancer screening strategies: mammograms and clinical breast examinations

The effectiveness data were derived from a review of published studies. Modelling A decision analysis based on a micro-simulation model was used. For all women who developed breast cancer during their lifetime, the authors simulated their natural histories. This included the age at onset of the preclinical disease, the preclinical durations (via tumour growth rates), the age at onset of the clinical disease, and the subsequent survival time depending on age and tumour characteristics at detection. For more (...) , Parmigiani G. Optimisation of breast cancer screening strategies. In: Nikoulina M, Commenges D, editors. Probability, statistics and modeling in public health. New York: Springer; In press. Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Adult; Aged; Breast Neoplasms /mortality /prevention & Comparative Study; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Humans; Mammography /economics; Mass Screening /economics; Middle Aged; Models, Statistical; Monte Carlo Method; Palpation /economics; Quality-Adjusted Life Years

2005 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

167. Toward optimal screening strategies for older women: costs, benefits, and harms of breast cancer screening by age, biology, and health status Full Text available with Trip Pro

began with a hypothetical cohort of women aged 50 and randomly assigned dates of death, preclinical and symptomatic breast cancer incidence, and uptake of first and subsequent screening mammograms. Women destined to get BC were assigned a date at which symptomatic illness would present (clinical presentation). If the tumour was detected before this time, the disease stage was calculated. Women developing BC were assigned an oestrogen receptor (ER) status and received treatment based on current (...) Factors; Aged; Aged, 80 and over; Biomarkers, Tumor; Breast Neoplasms /diagnosis /epidemiology /prevention & Cost-Benefit Analysis; Disease Progression; Female; Humans; Life Expectancy; Mammography /economics; Mass Screening /economics /standards /utilization; Middle Aged; Models, Econometric; Monte Carlo Method; Neoplasm Staging; Sensitivity and Specificity; Stochastic Processes; Survival Analysis; Value of Life; control AccessionNumber 22005001262 Date bibliographic record published 30/04/2006 Date

2005 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

168. Digital mammography: a screening modality for breast cancer

be required (personal communication Fuji Australia representative). CLINICAL NEED AND BURDEN OF DISEASE In Australia free mammographic screening is offered on a biennial basis to all asymptomatic women aged 50 to 69 years. Screening is also available to women aged over 40 on an annual basis if there is a strong family history of breast cancer. In the period 2000-2001 a total of 1,567,544 women attended a BreastScreen service with 1,063,479 (68%) in the target population, aged 50-69 years. Between (...) ). While screen-film mammography provides a powerful tool for early breast cancer detection, there are some reported fundamental limitations (D’Orsi 2002). These limitations relate to contrast characteristics, or the ability to discern subtle soft tissue density differences, and decreased sensitivity in detecting early malignancy in the dense breast. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY ISSUES At the time of preparing this summary two randomised, controlled trials were identified (level II screening evidence

2005 Australia and New Zealand Horizon Scanning Network

169. Screening with magnetic resonance imaging and mammography of a UK population at high familial risk of breast cancer: a prospective multicentre cohort study (MARIBS). (Abstract)

Screening with magnetic resonance imaging and mammography of a UK population at high familial risk of breast cancer: a prospective multicentre cohort study (MARIBS). Women genetically predisposed to breast cancer often develop the disease at a young age when dense breast tissue reduces the sensitivity of X-ray mammography. Our aim was, therefore, to compare contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE MRI) with mammography for screening.We did a prospective multicentre cohort study in 649 (...) women aged 35-49 years with a strong family history of breast cancer or a high probability of a BRCA1, BRCA2, or TP53 mutation. We recruited participants from 22 centres in the UK, and offered the women annual screening with CE MRI and mammography for 2-7 years.We diagnosed 35 cancers in the 649 women screened with both mammography and CE MRI (1881 screens): 19 by CE MRI only, six by mammography only, and eight by both, with two interval cases. Sensitivity was significantly higher for CE MRI (77

2005 Lancet

170. Risk for distant recurrence of breast cancer detected by mammography screening or other methods. Full Text available with Trip Pro

using immunohistochemistry or in situ hybridization and included ERBB2, TP53, and MK167 expression and ERBB2 amplification data.Univariate and multivariate analyses of potential risk factors for distant recurrence of breast cancer and 10-year survival.Of the 1983 women with unilateral invasive breast cancer, data on tumor diameter were available for 1918 women. Women with cancerous tumors detected by mammography screening had better estimated 10-year distant disease-free survival than women (...) Risk for distant recurrence of breast cancer detected by mammography screening or other methods. Selection of systemic adjuvant therapies for women diagnosed as having breast cancer is based on risk estimations for cancer recurrence. In such estimations, tumors detected by mammography screening are considered to be associated with a similar risk of recurrence as tumors of similar size found by other methods.To compare the risk of recurrence and survival among women with cancerous tumors

2004 JAMA

171. Efficacy of MRI and mammography for breast-cancer screening in women with a familial or genetic predisposition. Full Text available with Trip Pro

with a clinical breast examination and once a year by mammography and MRI, with independent readings. The characteristics of the cancers that were detected were compared with the characteristics of those in two different age-matched control groups.We screened 1909 eligible women, including 358 carriers of germ-line mutations. Within a median follow-up period of 2.9 years, 51 tumors (44 invasive cancers, 6 ductal carcinomas in situ, and 1 lymphoma) and 1 lobular carcinoma in situ were detected. The sensitivity (...) Efficacy of MRI and mammography for breast-cancer screening in women with a familial or genetic predisposition. The value of regular surveillance for breast cancer in women with a genetic or familial predisposition to breast cancer is currently unproven. We compared the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with that of mammography for screening in this group of high-risk women.Women who had a cumulative lifetime risk of breast cancer of 15 percent or more were screened every six months

2004 NEJM

172. Incidence of breast cancer in Norway and Sweden during introduction of nationwide screening: prospective cohort study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Incidence of breast cancer in Norway and Sweden during introduction of nationwide screening: prospective cohort study. To determine whether any increase in the incidence of breast cancer in women detected by mammography is compensated for by a drop in the incidence after age 69, years when women are no longer invited for screening.Population based cohort study of incidence of breast cancer during the introduction of nationwide screening programmes.Norway and Sweden.All women aged above 30 years (...) (1.4 and 2.9 million, respectively, in 2000).Changes in age specific incidence rates of invasive breast cancer associated with the introduction of the screening programmes.As a result of screening the recorded incidence of breast cancer in women aged 50-69 years increased by 54% in Norway and 45% in Sweden. There was no corresponding decline in incidence after the age of 69 years.Without screening one third of all invasive breast cancers in the age group 50-69 years would not have been detected

2004 BMJ

173. Presentation on websites of possible benefits and harms from screening for breast cancer: cross sectional study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Presentation on websites of possible benefits and harms from screening for breast cancer: cross sectional study. To investigate whether information on mammographic screening presented on websites by interest groups is balanced, is independent of source of funding, and reflects recent findings.Cross sectional study using a checklist with 17 information items.27 websites in Scandinavian and English speaking countries.The 13 sites from advocacy groups and the 11 from governmental institutions all (...) recommended mammographic screening, whereas the three from consumer organisations questioned screening (P = 0.0007). All the advocacy groups accepted industry funding, apparently without restrictions. In contrast the three consumer organisations acknowledged the risk of bias related to industry funding, and two of them did not accept such funding at all. Advocacy groups and governmental organisations favoured information items that shed positive light on screening. The major harms of screening

2004 BMJ

174. Review of the effectiveness of infrared thermal imaging (thermography) for population screening and diagnostic testing of breast cancer

trials. More robust research on the effectiveness and costs of technologically advanced infrared thermography devices for population screening and diagnostic testing of breast cancer is needed, and the conclusions of this review should be revisited in the face of additional reliable evidence. Project page URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Breast Neoplasms /diagnosis; Mass Screening; Thermography Language Published English Country of organisation New Zealand Address (...) Review of the effectiveness of infrared thermal imaging (thermography) for population screening and diagnostic testing of breast cancer Review of the effectiveness of infrared thermal imaging (thermography) for population screening and diagnostic testing of breast cancer Review of the effectiveness of infrared thermal imaging (thermography) for population screening and diagnostic testing of breast cancer Kerr J Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology

2004 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

175. MRI screening for breast cancer in genetically high-risk women

of breast cancers detected were small ranging from 1.6 to 17 per cent of all women enrolled. Most of the studies were conducted on relatively small numbers of women, the largest number of participants being 1,848. Project page URL INAHTA brief and checklist Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Breast Neoplasms /diagnosis /genetics; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Mammography; Mass Screening /methods Language Published English Country (...) be of particular use as a breast screening modality in women considered to be at high-risk of developing breast cancer who tend to develop disease at a significantly younger age and are usually pre-menopausal. These women, due to their age, have high-density breast tissue and therefore are difficult to screen utilising mammography. Women considered to be at high-risk of developing breast cancer include those with a familial or personal history of breast or ovarian cancer, or women with a demonstrated germ-line

2004 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

176. Should the French breast cancer screening programme be extended to women aged 40-49? Update

. This is an update of the ANAES 1999 guidelines. Authors' conclusions No extension of the French breast cancer screening programme to women aged 40-49 should be envisaged until efficacy and cost-effectiveness in older women (50-74 years) have been proven. Project page URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Breast Neoplasms /diagnosis; Mammography; Mass Screening Language Published French Country of organisation France English Summary English summary available Address for correspondence 2 (...) Should the French breast cancer screening programme be extended to women aged 40-49? Update Should the French breast cancer screening programme be extended to women aged 40-49? Update Should the French breast cancer screening programme be extended to women aged 40-49? Update L'Agence Nationale d'Accreditation d'Evaluation en Sante (ANAES) Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality

2004 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

177. Breast ductal lavage and fiberoptic ductoscopy for breast cancer diagnosis and screening

Breast ductal lavage and fiberoptic ductoscopy for breast cancer diagnosis and screening Breast ductal lavage and fiberoptic ductoscopy for breast cancer diagnosis and screening Breast ductal lavage and fiberoptic ductoscopy for breast cancer diagnosis and screening Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Breast ductal lavage and fiberoptic ductoscopy (...) for breast cancer diagnosis and screening. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. Directory Publication. 2004 Authors' objectives Breast ductal lavage (DL) and fiberoptic ductoscopy (FDS) are used to evaluate patients at risk for breast cancer. DL involves collection of breast ductal epithelial cells for cytological analysis, and FDS involves direct visualization of the breast duct lining with cytology or biopsy of abnormalities. These procedures are intended to be used in conjunction with clinical breast examination

2004 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

178. Mammography service screening and mortality in breast cancer patients: 20-year follow-up before and after introduction of screening. (Abstract)

Mammography service screening and mortality in breast cancer patients: 20-year follow-up before and after introduction of screening. The long term effect of mammographic service screening is not well established. We aimed to assess the long-term effect of mammographic screening on death from breast cancer, taking into account potential biases from self-selection, changes in breast cancer incidence, and classification of cause of death.We compared deaths from breast cancer diagnosed in the 20 (...) years before screening was introduced (1958-77) with those from breast cancer diagnosed in the 20 years after the introduction of screening (1978-97) in two Swedish counties, in 210000 women aged 20-69 years. We also compared deaths from all cancers and from all causes in patients diagnosed with breast cancer in the 20 years before and after screening was introduced. In the analysis, data were stratified into age-groups invited for screening (40-69 years) and not invited (20-39 years

2003 Lancet

179. The safety net: a cost-effective approach to improving breast and cervical cancer screening

The safety net: a cost-effective approach to improving breast and cervical cancer screening Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2003 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

180. Screening for prostate, breast and colorectal cancer in renal transplant recipients

Screening for prostate, breast and colorectal cancer in renal transplant recipients Screening for prostate, breast and colorectal cancer in renal transplant recipients Screening for prostate, breast and colorectal cancer in renal transplant recipients Kiberd B A, Keough-Ryan T, Clase C M Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed (...) by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The paper examines the cost-effectiveness of specific screening for prostate, breast and colorectal cancer for patients who have received a renal transplant. Breast cancer screening comprised a mammogram every 18 months. Prostate cancer screening involved an annual digital rectal examination and a prostate specific antigen assay. The screening programme for colorectal cancer required a faecal

2003 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.