Latest & greatest articles for breast cancer screening

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Top results for breast cancer screening

141. Probabilistic cost-effectiveness modeling of different breast cancer screening policies in Slovenia

-effective, owing to the increased costs and decreased benefits of false positives. The one-way sensitivity analysis showed that the most influential model inputs were discount rate, rate of progression from ductal carcinoma in situ to invasive cancer, recall rate, relative mortality in regional stage, rate of invasive diagnostics and cost of mammography. Authors' conclusions The authors concluded that the most cost-effective screening strategy for breast cancer is screening women aged 40 to 80 years (...) J Cancer Care 2003; 12: 143–53. de Koning HJ, van Ineveld BM, van Oortmarssen GJ, et al. Breast cancer screening and cost-effectiveness; policy alternatives, quality of life considerations and the possible impact of uncertain factors. Int J Cancer 1991; 49: 531–7. Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Breast Neoplasms /diagnosis /economics; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Early Diagnosis; Female; Health Care Costs; Health Policy /economics; Humans; Mammography /economics; Mass Screening

2008 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

142. Breast screening with ultrasound in women with mammography-negative dense breasts: evidence on incremental cancer detection and false positives, and associated cost

: a systematic review of their accuracy. Br J Cancer 2004;90:2118–22. Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Adult; Aged; Biopsy /economics /methods; Breast /pathology; Breast Neoplasms /economics /radiography /ultrasonography; Costs and Cost Analysis; False Positive Reactions; Female; Humans; Mammography /economics /standards; Middle Aged; Sensitivity and Specificity; Ultrasonography, Mammary /economics /standards AccessionNumber 22008000718 Date bibliographic record published 01/09/2008 Date (...) Breast screening with ultrasound in women with mammography-negative dense breasts: evidence on incremental cancer detection and false positives, and associated cost Breast screening with ultrasound in women with mammography-negative dense breasts: evidence on incremental cancer detection and false positives, and associated cost Breast screening with ultrasound in women with mammography-negative dense breasts: evidence on incremental cancer detection and false positives, and associated cost

2008 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

143. Cost-effectiveness of digital mammography breast cancer screening. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cost-effectiveness of digital mammography breast cancer screening. The DMIST (Digital Mammography Imaging Screening Trial) reported improved breast cancer detection with digital mammography compared with film mammography in selected population subgroups, but it did not assess the economic value of digital relative to film mammography screening.To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of digital mammography screening for breast cancer.Validated, discrete-event simulation model.Data from DMIST (...) to the cost of digital mammography and to the prevalence of dense breasts.Results were dependent on model assumptions and DMIST findings.Relative to film mammography, screening for breast cancer by using all-digital mammography is not cost-effective. Age-targeted screening with digital mammography seems cost-effective, whereas density-targeted screening strategies are more costly and of uncertain value, particularly among women age 65 years or older.

2008 Annals of Internal Medicine

144. [Information to users on cancer screening in women: assessment of current situation and establishment of evidence-based information standards. 1. Information to users on breast cancer screening]

[Information to users on cancer screening in women: assessment of current situation and establishment of evidence-based information standards. 1. Information to users on breast cancer screening] Informacion a usuarias sobre el cribado de cancer en la mujer: Evaluacion de la situacion actual y establecimiento de estandares de informacion basada en la evidencia: 1. Informacion a usuarias sobre el cribado de cancer de mama [Information to users on cancer screening in women: assessment of current (...) situation and establishment of evidence-based information standards. 1. Information to users on breast cancer screening] Informacion a usuarias sobre el cribado de cancer en la mujer: Evaluacion de la situacion actual y establecimiento de estandares de informacion basada en la evidencia: 1. Informacion a usuarias sobre el cribado de cancer de mama [Information to users on cancer screening in women: assessment of current situation and establishment of evidence-based information standards. 1. Information

2007 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

145. A systematic review of the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an addition to mammography and ultrasound in screening young women at high risk of breast cancer

A systematic review of the effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an addition to mammography and ultrasound in screening young women at high risk of breast cancer Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2007 DARE.

146. Magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening in women at high risk

. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. Directory Publication. 2007 Authors' objectives The objectives of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to screen women at high risk for breast cancer are to improve the sensitivity of screening in this group of women, with the goal of providing early diagnosis and reducing the mortality rate associated with breast cancer. Project page URL Final publication URL The report may be purchased from: Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Breast Neoplasms /prevention (...) Magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening in women at high risk Magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening in women at high risk Magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening in women at high risk Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Magnetic resonance imaging for breast cancer screening in women at high risk

2007 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

147. Effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening for women at high risk of breast cancer

Effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening for women at high risk of breast cancer Effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening for women at high risk of breast cancer Effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening for women at high risk of breast cancer Dunfield L, Severn M Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made (...) for the HTA database. Citation Dunfield L, Severn M. Effectiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening for women at high risk of breast cancer. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Technology Report No 93. 2007 Authors' objectives "Research Questions; 1. What is the clinical effectiveness of MRI screening compared to film mammography in women with a high risk of breast cancer? 2. What is the cost-effectiveness of MRI screening compared to film mammography

2007 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

148. Screening mammography for women aged 40 to 49 years at average risk for breast cancer: an evidence-based analysis

Screening mammography for women aged 40 to 49 years at average risk for breast cancer: an evidence-based analysis Screening mammography for women aged 40 to 49 years at average risk for breast cancer: an evidence-based analysis Screening mammography for women aged 40 to 49 years at average risk for breast cancer: an evidence-based analysis Medical Advisory Secretariat Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation (...) of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Medical Advisory Secretariat. Screening mammography for women aged 40 to 49 years at average risk for breast cancer: an evidence-based analysis. Toronto: Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS). Volume 7(1). 2007 Authors' objectives The aim of this review was to determine the effectiveness of screening mammography in women aged 40 to 49 years at average risk for breast cancer. The following questions were asked: Does screening

2007 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

149. Does utilization of screening mammography explain racial and ethnic differences in breast cancer? (Abstract)

Consortium. Cancer diagnoses were ascertained through linkage with pathology databases; Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results programs; and state tumor registries.1,010,515 women 40 years of age and older who had at least 1 mammogram between 1996 and 2002; 17,558 of these women had diagnosed breast cancer.Patterns of mammography and the probability of inadequate mammography screening were examined. The authors evaluated whether overall and advanced cancer rates were similar across racial and ethnic (...) of the breast. The observed differences in advanced cancer rates between African American and white women were attenuated or eliminated after the cohort was stratified by screening history. Among women who were previously screened at intervals of 4 to 41 months, African-American women were no more likely to have large, advanced-stage tumors or lymph node involvement than white women with the same screening history. African-American women had higher rates of high-grade tumors than white women regardless

2006 Annals of Internal Medicine

150. Effect of mammographic screening from age 40 years on breast cancer mortality at 10 years' follow-up: a randomised controlled trial. (Abstract)

Effect of mammographic screening from age 40 years on breast cancer mortality at 10 years' follow-up: a randomised controlled trial. The efficacy of screening by mammography has been shown in randomised controlled trials in women aged 50 years and older, but is less clear in younger women. A meta-analysis of all previous trials showed a 15% mortality reduction in invited women aged 40-49 years at study entry, but this finding could be due in part to screening of women after age 50 years (...) at 10 years' follow-up. This study is registered as an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial, number ISRCTN24647151.At a mean follow-up of 10.7 years there was a reduction in breast-cancer mortality in the intervention group, in relative and absolute terms, which did not reach statistical significance (relative risk 0.83 [95% CI 0.66-1.04], p=0.11; absolute risk reduction 0.40 per 1000 women invited to screening [95% CI -0.07 to 0.87]). Mortality reduction adjusted for non-compliance

2006 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

151. Rate of over-diagnosis of breast cancer 15 years after end of Malmö mammographic screening trial: follow-up study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Rate of over-diagnosis of breast cancer 15 years after end of Malmö mammographic screening trial: follow-up study. To evaluate the rate of over-diagnosis of breast cancer 15 years after the end of the Malmö mammographic screening trial.Follow-up study.Malmö, Sweden.42 283 women aged 45-69 years at randomisation.Screening for breast cancer with mammography or not (controls). Screening was offered at the end of the randomisation design to both groups aged 45-54 at randomisation but not to groups (...) ) at the end of follow-up.Conclusions on over-diagnosis of breast cancer in the Malmö mammographic screening trial can be drawn mainly for women aged 55-69 years at randomisation whose control groups were never screened. Fifteen years after the trial ended the rate of over-diagnosis of breast cancer was 10% in this age group.

2006 BMJ Controlled trial quality: uncertain

152. Effects of conjugated equine estrogens on breast cancer and mammography screening in postmenopausal women with hysterectomy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effects of conjugated equine estrogens on breast cancer and mammography screening in postmenopausal women with hysterectomy. The Women's Health Initiative Estrogen-Aone trial comparing conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) with placebo was stopped early because of an increased stroke incidence and no reduction in risk of coronary heart disease. Preliminary results suggesting possible reduction in breast cancers warranted more detailed analysis.To determine the effects of CEE on breast cancers (...) and mammographic findings.Following breast cancer risk assessment, 10,739 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years with prior hysterectomy were randomized to CEE or placebo at 40 US clinical centers from 1993 through 1998. Mammography screenings and clinical breast examinations were performed at baseline and annually. All breast cancers diagnosed through February 29, 2004, are included.A dose of 0.625 mg/d of CEE or an identical-appearing placebo.Breast cancer incidence, tumor characteristics, and mammogram

2006 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

153. [The impact of an extension of breast cancer screening: update of Finohta's report 16/2000]

or more cost-effective treatments. Disadvantages: The most important disadvantage of mammography screenings is that they may raise suspicions of breast cancer that turn out to be false in further examinations (false positive screening results). They give rise to concern and further diagnostic tests. After further examinations, about six in a thousand women screened are referred to surgery. The tumour is benign in a quarter of the women operated on. An extension of screening to the 60-69 age group (...) [The impact of an extension of breast cancer screening: update of Finohta's report 16/2000] Rintasyopaseulonnan laajentamisen vaikutukset. Paivitys Finohtan raporttiin 16/2000 [The impact of an extension of breast cancer screening: update of Finohta's report 16/2000] Rintasyopaseulonnan laajentamisen vaikutukset. Paivitys Finohtan raporttiin 16/2000 [The impact of an extension of breast cancer screening: update of Finohta's report 16/2000] Makela M, Saalasti-Koskinen U, Saarenmaa I, Autti-Ramo

2006 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

154. Breast cancer screening, outside the population-screening program, of women from breast cancer families without proven BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations: a simulation study

in life-years, per 1,000 women screened. Outcomes assessed in the review The outcomes assessed from the literature were: the sensitivity and specificity of mammography for women younger and older than 50 years; the median tumour volume doubling time for women younger and older than 50 years; the breast cancer induction risk due to mammography radiation for women younger and older than 50 years; the relative risk of dying from breast cancer for women aged 30 to 50 years, compared with women above (...) the results of the review with their own assumptions, which were supported with findings from the literature. Estimates of effectiveness and key assumptions The authors made the following assumptions. Screening caused a shift to finding tumours at early stages. This led to a 50% better survival rate among women with screen-detected breast cancer compared with clinically detected tumours. Women with a familial predisposition for breast cancer were at a higher risk of radiation-induced cancer than women

2006 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

155. Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening modalities for breast cancer in Japan with special reference to women aged 40-49 years Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening modalities for breast cancer in Japan with special reference to women aged 40-49 years Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening modalities for breast cancer in Japan with special reference to women aged 40-49 years Cost-effectiveness analysis of screening modalities for breast cancer in Japan with special reference to women aged 40-49 years Ohnuki K, Kuriyama S, Shoji N, Nishino Y, Tsuji I, Ohuchi N Record Status This is a critical abstract (...) of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Three modalities of screening for breast cancer (BC) were examined: annual clinical breast examination (CBE) alone; annual CBE and screening mammography (SMG) in combination; and biennial CBE and SMG. All screening strategies could

2006 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

156. Cost-effectiveness of screening with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging vs X-ray mammography of women at a high familial risk of breast cancer Full Text available with Trip Pro

/genetics; Breast Neoplasms /diagnosis /genetics; Cost-Benefit Analysis; Female; Genetic Predisposition to Disease; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging /economics; Mammography /economics; Mass Screening /economics; Middle Aged; Mutation; Radiographic Image Enhancement /economics; Risk Factors; X-Rays AccessionNumber 22006002170 Date bibliographic record published 30/04/2007 Date abstract record published 30/04/2007 NHS Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) Produced by the Centre for Reviews (...) Cost-effectiveness of screening with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging vs X-ray mammography of women at a high familial risk of breast cancer Cost-effectiveness of screening with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging vs X-ray mammography of women at a high familial risk of breast cancer Cost-effectiveness of screening with contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging vs X-ray mammography of women at a high familial risk of breast cancer Griebsch I, Brown J, Boggis C, Dixon

2006 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

157. Diagnostic performance of digital versus film mammography for breast-cancer screening. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Diagnostic performance of digital versus film mammography for breast-cancer screening. Film mammography has limited sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer in women with radiographically dense breasts. We assessed whether the use of digital mammography would avoid some of these limitations.A total of 49,528 asymptomatic women presenting for screening mammography at 33 sites in the United States and Canada underwent both digital and film mammography. All relevant information was available (...) women (difference, 0.15; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.05 to 0.24; P=0.002).The overall diagnostic accuracy of digital and film mammography as a means of screening for breast cancer is similar, but digital mammography is more accurate in women under the age of 50 years, women with radiographically dense breasts, and premenopausal or perimenopausal women. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00008346.)Copyright 2005 Massachusetts Medical Society.

2005 NEJM

158. Effect of screening and adjuvant therapy on mortality from breast cancer. (Abstract)

Effect of screening and adjuvant therapy on mortality from breast cancer. We used modeling techniques to assess the relative and absolute contributions of screening mammography and adjuvant treatment to the reduction in breast-cancer mortality in the United States from 1975 to 2000.A consortium of investigators developed seven independent statistical models of breast-cancer incidence and mortality. All seven groups used the same sources to obtain data on the use of screening mammography (...) , adjuvant treatment, and benefits of treatment with respect to the rate of death from breast cancer.The proportion of the total reduction in the rate of death from breast cancer attributed to screening varied in the seven models from 28 to 65 percent (median, 46 percent), with adjuvant treatment contributing the rest. The variability across models in the absolute contribution of screening was larger than it was for treatment, reflecting the greater uncertainty associated with estimating the benefit

2005 NEJM

159. Screening for breast cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Screening for breast cancer. Breast cancer screening in community practices may be different from that in randomized controlled trials. New screening modalities are becoming available.To review breast cancer screening, especially in the community and to examine evidence about new screening modalities.English-language articles of randomized controlled trials assessing effectiveness of breast cancer screening were reviewed, as well as meta-analyses, systematic reviews, studies of breast cancer (...) screening in the community, and guidelines. Also, studies of newer screening modalities were assessed.All major US medical organizations recommend screening mammography for women aged 40 years and older. Screening mammography reduces breast cancer mortality by about 20% to 35% in women aged 50 to 69 years and slightly less in women aged 40 to 49 years at 14 years of follow-up. Approximately 95% of women with abnormalities on screening mammograms do not have breast cancer with variability based

2005 JAMA

160. Breast cancer mortality in Copenhagen after introduction of mammography screening: cohort study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Breast cancer mortality in Copenhagen after introduction of mammography screening: cohort study. To evaluate the effect on breast cancer mortality during the first 10 years of the mammography service screening programme that was introduced in Copenhagen in 1991.Cohort study.The mammography service screening programme in Copenhagen, Denmark.All women ever invited to mammography screening in the first 10 years of the programme. Historical, national, and historical national control groups were (...) used.The main outcome measure was breast cancer mortality. We compared breast cancer mortality in the study group with rates in the control groups, adjusting for age, time period, and region.Breast cancer mortality in the screening period was reduced by 25% (relative risk 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.63 to 0.89) compared with what we would expect in the absence of screening. For women actually participating in screening, breast cancer mortality was reduced by 37%.In the Copenhagen programme, breast

2005 BMJ