Latest & greatest articles for acne

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on acne or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on acne and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Acne treatment and clinical papers

Acne is a common skin condition characterised by whiteheads (or blackheads), pimples and oily skin. It can lead to possible scarring. It is typically caused when hair follicles become inflamed and the sebaceous glands in the skin are overactive. The over production of sebum and a combination of dead skin cells and dirt can clog follicles and pores causing a break out. Acne can affect any age group but it’s more common in adolescents.

There are many ways to treat acne depending on the severity of the case. Treatments include a range of medications such as topical retinoids, antibiotics and in severe cases isotretinoin is prescribed. Research is ongoing to determine the side effects and harms caused by these drugs. Clinical trials and studies are vital to assess treatment.

The Trip Database has an extensive collection of articles on acne ranging from clinical trials, systematic reviews, clinical guidelines and case reports. These can be found via searching the site.

Top results for acne

24. Epiduo (adapalene/benzoyl peroxide) 0.3%/2.5% - acne vulgaris

Epiduo (adapalene/benzoyl peroxide) 0.3%/2.5% - acne vulgaris Epiduo® (adapalene/benzoyl peroxide) 0.3%/2.5% × Insert searchphrase to search the website Insert searchphrase to search the website > > > Epiduo® (adapalene/benzoyl peroxide) 0.3%/2.5% Conclusion Epiduo gel is approved for the treatment of acne vulgaris when comedones, several papules and pustules are present. Epiduo contains a combination of the active substances adapalene 3 mg/g (0.3%) and benzoyl peroxide 25 mg/g (2.5 (...) %) – in the following referred to as 0.3% A/BPO. Epiduo is also available in a lower strength containing adapalene 1 mg/g (0.1%) and benzoyl peroxide 25 mg/g (2.5%) – in the following referred to as 0.1% A/BPO. A statistically significant increase in efficacy has been observed in treatment with 0.3% A/BPO of patients with moderate to severe acne compared to inactive vehicle measured by improvement of acne and change in the number of inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions. After 12 weeks’ treatment with 0.3

2017 Danish Pharmacotherapy Reviews

25. The age-old problem of acne Full Text available with Trip Pro

The age-old problem of acne Acne vulgaris is one of the top three most commonly encountered dermatological problems worldwide in both primary and secondary care. Acne diagnosis and treatment date back to ancient Greek and Egyptian times. This article explores acne through the ages and discusses past theories on etiology and treatment with particular focus on the discovery of retinoids and their impact on women's health.

2016 International journal of women's dermatology

26. Light therapies for acne. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Light therapies for acne. Acne vulgaris is a very common skin problem that presents with blackheads, whiteheads, and inflamed spots. It frequently results in physical scarring and may cause psychological distress. The use of oral and topical treatments can be limited in some people due to ineffectiveness, inconvenience, poor tolerability or side-effects. Some studies have suggested promising results for light therapies.To explore the effects of light treatment of different wavelengths (...) these searches in July 2016 but these results have not yet been incorporated into the review.We included RCTs of light for treatment of acne vulgaris, regardless of language or publication status.We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane.We included 71 studies, randomising a total of 4211 participants.Most studies were small (median 31 participants) and included participants with mild to moderate acne of both sexes and with a mean age of 20 to 30 years. Light interventions differed

2016 Cochrane

27. Guideline for the Treatment of Acne

with facial dermatological diseases. The recommendations of this guideline apply primarily to the treatment of facial acne. More widespread involvement will certainly favour earlier use of a systemic treatment due to the efficacy and practicability of such treatments. 1.7 Clinical features and variants Layton/ Finlay Acne (synonym “acne vulgaris”) is a polymorphic chronic inflammatory skin disease nearly always affecting the face (99 %) and clinically presents with open and/or closed comedones (...) 2002 [9] Mild Mild/moderate Severe Severe Gollnick 2003 [13] Mild comedonal Mild papular- pustular, moderate papular- pustular Moderate nodular Severe nodular/ conglobate FDA’s IGA for acne vulgaris (2005) [18] 1 Almost clear: rare NIL with no more than 1 2 Mild: some NIL but no more than a few papule/ 3 Moderate: many NIL, some IL no more than 1 nodule 4 Severe: up to many non- inflammatory and inflammatory 11 papule pustule lesions, but no more than a few nodular lesions Del Rosso 2007 [31

2016 European Dermatology Forum

28. Acne clinical guideline Full Text available with Trip Pro

Acne clinical guideline Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris - Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search JAAD & JAAD Case Reports Search Terms Search within Search Access provided by Volume 74, Issue 5, Pages 945–973.e33 Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris Work Group:, x Andrea L. Zaenglein Affiliations Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania , MD (Co-Chair) a , x Arun L. Pathy Affiliations (...) translations or adaptations of the article | Fig 1 Treatment algorithm for the management of acne vulgaris in adolescents and young adults. The double asterisks (∗∗) indicate that the drug may be prescribed as a fixed combination product or as separate component. BP , Benzoyl peroxide. Hide Pane Expand all Collapse all Article Outline Acne is one of the most common disorders treated by dermatologists and other health care providers. While it most often affects adolescents, it is not uncommon in adults

2016 American Academy of Dermatology

29. Is less more with isotretinoin and acne?

Is less more with isotretinoin and acne? Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 4,000 family physicians, family medicine residents and medical students in Alberta. Established over fifty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education and primary care research. www.acfp.ca March 14, 2016 Is less more (...) with isotretinoin and acne? Clinical Question: What is the efficacy and tolerability of low-dose compared to conventional dose isotretinoin in the treatment of acne? Bottom-line: Small randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies demonstrate low-dose (~20mg/day) isotretinoin improves acne similar to conventional dosing. Low-dose may reduce common side effects (chapped lips, dry skin, epistaxis) by 16-35% but may be associated with increased relapse rates, particularly with severe acne

2016 Tools for Practice

30. Management of acne

and inflammatory acne. 16 Since the last Canadian acne guideline was published in 2000, 17 evidence for multiple addi­ tional treatments has been published. Thus, there was an unmet need for an updated, systematic­ ally developed, evidence­ based Canadian acne clinical practice guideline. This guideline pro­ vides recommendations adapted to the Canadian health care system to assist Canadian health care providers in the diagnosis of acne vulgaris, including investigations where appropriate; it also provides (...) updated information on the patho­ genesis of acne, outlines methods for evaluating acne severity, provides evidence­ based guidance on treatments for acne vulgaris and recommends treatments for acne according to severity. To support clinical practice, recommenda­ tions are made for three categories of acne sever­ ity: comedonal acne, which consists of small white papules (closed comedones) or grey–white papules (open comedones), which are due to complete or partial ductal occlusion, respec­ tively

2015 CPG Infobase

31. Complementary therapies for acne: do they hit the spot?

Complementary therapies for acne: do they hit the spot? Complementary therapies for acne: do they hit the spot? - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By February 6, 2015 // What a misery acne can be and few teens escape it completely. It can last well into adulthood too. There are many treatments available, both over-the-counter and on prescription. Many people look to alternatives to medical treatment, such as herbal preparations and changes to their diet. Are they any good? A team from set (...) out to find out. Their brought together the best available evidence from randomised controlled trials on complementary therapies for acne. There are 35 trials (over 3000 people) looking at herbal medicine, acupuncture, wet cupping, diet, purified bee venom, and tea tree oil. Here’s what they found: Low- versus high-glycaemic load diets were compared. There was no clear evidence of a difference between groups in the number of non-inflammatory lesions after 12 weeks (2 studies combined). The low

2015 Evidently Cochrane

32. Clinical and sebumetric evaluation of topical emulsions in the treatment of acne vulgaris. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Clinical and sebumetric evaluation of topical emulsions in the treatment of acne vulgaris. Numerous plant products described in the scientific literature show distinct activities on the skin, such as moisturizing, antioxidant, sunscreen, anti-acne and depigmentation.The main objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of emulsion formulations containing plant extracts (Hippophae rhamnoides and Cassia fistula) and placebo (without plant extracts) on acne patients.A single-blind (...) , randomized, placebo-controlled, split-face study was designed. Two groups of 25 patients each (aged 18-37 years) with grade I and grade II acne vulgaris received active formulations on the left side of their cheeks and placebo on the right side of their cheeks twice daily for 12 weeks. Prior to the study, signed consent was obtained from each patient. The anti-bacterial activity of the extracts and formulations was tested in vitro. The skin sebum contents of patients were evaluated by the sebumeter(®

2014 Postepy dermatologii i alergologii Controlled trial quality: uncertain

33. Methyl aminolevulinate (Visonac) photodynamic therapy for acne vulgaris

Methyl aminolevulinate (Visonac) photodynamic therapy for acne vulgaris Methyl aminolevulinate (Visonac) photodynamic therapy for acne vulgaris Methyl aminolevulinate (Visonac) photodynamic therapy for acne vulgaris NIHR HSC Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation NIHR HSC. Methyl aminolevulinate (Visonac) photodynamic therapy (...) for acne vulgaris. Birmingham: NIHR Horizon Scanning Centre (NIHR HSC). Horizon Scanning Review. 2013 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Acne Vulgaris; Aminolevulinic Acids; Photochemotherapy Language Published English Country of organisation England English summary An English language summary is available. Address for correspondence The NIHR Horizon Scanning Centre, Department of Public Health, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics, School of Health&Population

2013 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

34. Acne vulgaris. (Abstract)

Acne vulgaris. Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit resulting from androgen-induced increased sebum production, altered keratinisation, inflammation, and bacterial colonisation of hair follicles on the face, neck, chest, and back by Propionibacterium acnes. Although early colonisation with P acnes and family history might have important roles in the disease, exactly what triggers acne and how treatment affects the course of the disease remain unclear. Other factors (...) such as diet have been implicated, but not proven. Facial scarring due to acne affects up to 20% of teenagers. Acne can persist into adulthood, with detrimental effects on self-esteem. There is no ideal treatment for acne, although a suitable regimen for reducing lesions can be found for most patients. Good quality evidence on comparative effectiveness of common topical and systemic acne therapies is scarce. Topical therapies including benzoyl peroxide, retinoids, and antibiotics when used in combination

2011 Lancet

35. Acne best practice management

Acne best practice management 656 Reprinted from Aust RAli An F Amily Physici An Vol. 39, n o. 9, se Ptembe R 2010 David Cook George Krassas Tom Huang Acne Best practice management Background Acne vulgaris can have a substantial impact on a patient’s quality of life; there can be significant psychosocial consequences and it can leave permanent physical scarring. Early and effective acne treatment is important. Objective To describe the outcome of an accredited clinical audit investigating (...) general practitioner management of acne vulgaris and to provide an outline of current ‘best practice’ acne management. Discussion The audit was conducted over two cycles with GPs receiving educational material between cycles. Eighty-five GPs contributed data on 1638 patients. General practitioner management of acne was assessed against a set of preset standards and some acne treatment was found to be inconsistent with best practice, particularly for patients with moderate and moderate to severe acne

2010 The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

36. Acne best practice management

Acne best practice management RACGP - Acne – best practice management Search the RACGP website Latest issue December 2017 Vol 46(12) 881-960 Articles in the December issue discuss various health issues affecting school-aged children, including acne, eczema and growth disorders. Australian Family Physician Joint pain September 2010 / / / / Clinical Acne Best practice management Pages 656-660 David Cook George Krassas Tom Huang Background Acne vulgaris can have a substantial impact on a patient’s (...) quality of life; there can be significant psychosocial consequences and it can leave permanent physical scarring. Early and effective acne treatment is important. Objective/s To describe the outcome of an accredited clinical audit investigating general practitioner management of acne vulgaris and to provide an outline of current ‘best practice’ acne management. Discussion The audit was conducted over two cycles with GPs receiving educational material between cycles. Eighty-five GPs contributed data

2010 The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners

37. Advice on the safe introduction and continued use of isotretinoin in acne in the UK

, Caputo R et al. Roaccutane treat- ment guidelines: results of an international survey. Dermatology 1997; 194:351–7. 8 Taibjee SM, Charles-Holmes R. Pitfalls of prescribing acne therapies including isotretinoin for pilots. Br J Dermatol 2007; 158:653–5. 9 Barth JH, Macdonald-Hull SP, Mark J et al. Isotretinoin therapy for acne vulgaris: a re-evaluation of the need for measurements of plasma lipids and liver function tests. Br J Dermatol 1993; 129:704– 7. 10 Alcalay J, Landau M, Zucker A. Analysis (...) of laboratory data in acne patients treated with isotretinoin: is there really a need to perform routine laboratory tests? J Dermatolog Treat 2001; 12:9–12. 11 Zane LT, Leyden WA, Marqueling AL, Manos MM. A population- based analysis of laboratory abnormalities during isotretinoin ther- apy for acne vulgaris. Arch Dermatol 2006; 142:1016–22. 12 Rodondi N, Darioli R, Ramelet A et al. High risk for hyperlipidemia and the metabolic syndrome after an episode of hypertriglyceride- mia during 13-cis retinoic acid

2010 British Association of Dermatologists

38. Meta-analysis comparing efficacy of benzoyl peroxide, clindamycin, benzoyl peroxide with salicylic acid, and combination benzoyl peroxide/clindamycin in acne

Meta-analysis comparing efficacy of benzoyl peroxide, clindamycin, benzoyl peroxide with salicylic acid, and combination benzoyl peroxide/clindamycin in acne Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2010 DARE.

39. The use of salicylic acid in a new delivery system as a co-adjuvant topical treatment for acne vulgaris. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The use of salicylic acid in a new delivery system as a co-adjuvant topical treatment for acne vulgaris. Topical preparations in the form of creams or ointments are the usual treatment for acne. These agents do not seem to penetrate the skin barrier deeply enough to produce the desired effect.We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, prospective study to evaluate the effectiveness of salicylic acid in a new delivery system, the Crown Carrier System (CCS, Trivitaderm LLC, Asheville, NC (...) ) for the treatment of acne.Thirty-seven patients with homogenous backgrounds were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group A was treated with salicylic acid in CCS, Group B was treated with CCS without salicylic acid, and Group C received salicylic acid alone. Patients were evaluated at 2 weeks and 8 weeks post-treatment.Twenty-five patients completed the evaluation. Most patients in Group A presented with no changes in the number of acne lesions but with significant improvement of inflammatory signs. Their overall

2009 Aesthetic surgery journal Controlled trial quality: uncertain

40. Laser and other light therapies for the treatment of acne vulgaris: systematic review

Laser and other light therapies for the treatment of acne vulgaris: systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2009 DARE.