Latest & greatest articles for sedation

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Top results for sedation

1. Early Sedation with Dexmedetomidine in Critically Ill Patients. (PubMed)

Early Sedation with Dexmedetomidine in Critically Ill Patients. Dexmedetomidine produces sedation while maintaining a degree of arousability and may reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and delirium among patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). The use of dexmedetomidine as the sole or primary sedative agent in patients undergoing mechanical ventilation has not been extensively studied.In an open-label, randomized trial, we enrolled critically ill adults who had been undergoing (...) ventilation for less than 12 hours in the ICU and were expected to continue to receive ventilatory support for longer than the next calendar day to receive dexmedetomidine as the sole or primary sedative or to receive usual care (propofol, midazolam, or other sedatives). The target range of sedation-scores on the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale (which is scored from -5 [unresponsive] to +4 [combative]) was -2 to +1 (lightly sedated to restless). The primary outcome was the rate of death from any

2019 NEJM

2. Guidelines for Monitoring and Management of Pediatric Patients Before, During, and After Sedation for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures

Guidelines for Monitoring and Management of Pediatric Patients Before, During, and After Sedation for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures Guidelines for Monitoring and Management of Pediatric Patients Before, During, and After Sedation for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures | From the American Academy of Pediatrics | Pediatrics '); document.write(''); } function OAS_AD(pos) { if (OAS_version >= 11 && typeof(OAS_RICH)!='undefined') { OAS_RICH(pos); } else { OAS_NORMAL(pos); } } //--> Search (...) for this keyword Source User menu Sections Sign up for highlighting editor-chosen studies with the greatest impact on clinical care. From the American Academy of Pediatrics Guidelines for Monitoring and Management of Pediatric Patients Before, During, and After Sedation for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Procedures Charles J. Coté , Stephen Wilson , AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRICS , AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY Abstract The safe sedation of children for procedures requires a systematic approach

2019 American Academy of Pediatrics

3. Is the Level of Sedation Depth in the Early Postintubation Period Associated With Worse Patient Outcomes? (Full text)

Is the Level of Sedation Depth in the Early Postintubation Period Associated With Worse Patient Outcomes? Is the Level of Sedation Depth in the Early Postintubation Period Associated With Worse Patient Outcomes? - Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 73, Issue 5, Pages 488–490 Is the Level of Sedation Depth in the Early Postintubation Period Associated With Worse Patient Outcomes? x Michael (...) Gottlieb , MD (EBEM Commentator) , x Keya A. Patel , MD (EBEM Commentator) , x William G. McDowell , MD (EBEM Commentator) Department of Emergency Medicine, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL DOI: | Publication History Published online: December 20, 2018 Expand all Collapse all Article Outline Take-Home Message Compared with deep sedation, light sedation early in the postintubation course is associated with reduced mortality, decreased length of ICU stay, and fewer days of mechanical

2019 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots PubMed

4. Safety and Efficacy of Remimazolam Compared With Placebo and Midazolam for Moderate Sedation During Bronchoscopy

Safety and Efficacy of Remimazolam Compared With Placebo and Midazolam for Moderate Sedation During Bronchoscopy While the complexity of flexible bronchoscopy has increased, standard options for moderate sedation medications have not changed in three decades. There is a need to improve moderate sedation while maintaining safety. Remimazolam was developed to address shortcomings of current sedation strategies.A prospective, double-blind, randomized, multicenter, parallel group trial (...) was performed at 30 US sites. The efficacy and safety of remimazolam for sedation during flexible bronchoscopy were compared with placebo and open-label midazolam.The success rates were 80.6% in the remimazolam arm, 4.8% in the placebo arm (P < .0001), and 32.9% in the midazolam arm. Bronchoscopy was started sooner in the remimazolam arm (mean, 6.4 ± 5.82 min) compared with placebo (17.2 ± 4.15 min; P < .0001) and midazolam (16.3 ± 8.60 min). Time to full alertness after the end of bronchoscopy

2019 EvidenceUpdates

5. Dexmedetomidine (Dexdor) - Sedation of non-intubated adult patients prior to and/or during diagnostic or surgical procedures requiring sedation

Dexmedetomidine (Dexdor) - Sedation of non-intubated adult patients prior to and/or during diagnostic or surgical procedures requiring sedation Published 11 February 2019 Statement of advice SMC2161 dexmedetomidine 100 micrograms/ml concentrate for solution for infusion (Dexdor®) Orion Pharma UK Limited 11 January 2019 ADVICE: in the absence of a submission from the holder of the marketing authorisation dexmedetomidine (Dexdor®) is not recommended for use within NHSScotland. Indication under (...) review: Sedation of non-intubated adult patients prior to and/or during diagnostic or surgical procedures requiring sedation, i.e. procedural/awake sedation. The holder of the marketing authorisation has not made a submission to SMC regarding this product in this indication. As a result we cannot recommend its use within NHSScotland. Advice context: No part of this advice may be used without the whole of the advice being quoted in full. This advice represents the view of the Scottish Medicines

2019 Scottish Medicines Consortium

6. Clinical practice guidelines for pain, agitation, delirium, sedation and mobilisation in the intensive care unit: A Rapid Review

Clinical practice guidelines for pain, agitation, delirium, sedation and mobilisation in the intensive care unit: A Rapid Review ICU pain, agitation, delirium, sedation and mobilisation CPGs: A Rapid Review 1 Clinical practice guidelines for pain, agitation, delirium, sedation and mobilisation in the intensive care unit: A Rapid Review Citation Corey Joseph & Angela Melder. April 2018. Clinical practice guidelines for pain, agitation, delirium, sedation and mobilisation in the intensive care (...) unit: A Rapid Review. Centre for Clinical Effectiveness, Monash Health, Melbourne, Australia. Contact cce@monashhealth.org Executive Summary Background The Program Medical Director for Critical Care has requested a review of clinical practice guidelines for pain, agitation, delirium, sedation and mobilisation in the intensive care unit (ICU) to inform future implementation of a new clinical practice guideline in the ICU. Objectives The objective of this review was to review and summarise current

2019 Monash Health Evidence Reviews

7. Premedication With Midazolam or Haloperidol to Prevent Recovery Agitation in Adults Undergoing Procedural Sedation With Ketamine: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial

Premedication With Midazolam or Haloperidol to Prevent Recovery Agitation in Adults Undergoing Procedural Sedation With Ketamine: A Randomized Double-Blind Clinical Trial We evaluate the effect of midazolam and haloperidol premedication for reducing ketamine-induced recovery agitation in adult patients undergoing procedural sedation. We also compare physician satisfaction and recovery time.We randomized emergency department patients older than 18 years who needed procedural sedation to receive (...) 1 of the following 3 interventions in double-blind fashion 5 minutes before receiving intravenous ketamine at 1 mg/kg: intravenous distilled water, intravenous midazolam at 0.05 mg/kg, or intravenous haloperidol at 5 mg. Our main study outcomes were recovery agitation as assessed by the maximum observed Pittsburgh Agitation Scale score and by the Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale score at 5, 15, and 30 minutes after ketamine administration. Our secondary outcomes were clinician satisfaction

2019 EvidenceUpdates

8. Vomiting is the most common adverse effect among children and young people sedated for emergency procedures

Vomiting is the most common adverse effect among children and young people sedated for emergency procedures Vomiting is the most common adverse effect among children and young people sedated for emergency procedures Discover Portal Discover Portal Vomiting is the most common adverse effect among children and young people sedated for emergency procedures Published on 27 September 2016 doi: Vomiting is the most common adverse event when sedating a child or young person undergoing a procedure (...) in the emergency department, occurring in 55.5 out of 1,000 cases. Agitation occurred in 17.9/1,000 cases, and hypoxia – lack of oxygen – in 14.8 out of 1,000 cases. Serious breathing problems needing intervention to provide ventilation were rare, but highlight the need for experienced staff when giving sedation to children. This systematic review included 41 studies, six of which were UK-based. It pooled the frequency of adverse events when using different sedation drugs, alone or in combination

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

9. Is percutaneous mitral valve repair performed under deep sedation feasible and safe compared to general anesthesia in patients undergoing percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve reconstruction?

Is percutaneous mitral valve repair performed under deep sedation feasible and safe compared to general anesthesia in patients undergoing percutaneous edge-to-edge mitral valve reconstruction? Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears

2019 PROSPERO

10. Ketamine-propofol (ketofol) for procedural sedation and analgesia in pediatric patients

Ketamine-propofol (ketofol) for procedural sedation and analgesia in pediatric patients Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files or external websites

2019 PROSPERO

11. Sedation of children undergoing dental treatment. (Full text)

Sedation of children undergoing dental treatment. Children's fear about dental treatment may lead to behaviour management problems for the dentist, which can be a barrier to the successful dental treatment of children. Sedation can be used to relieve anxiety and manage behaviour in children undergoing dental treatment. There is a need to determine from published research which agents, dosages and regimens are effective. This is the second update of the Cochrane Review first published in 2005 (...) and previously updated in 2012.To evaluate the efficacy and relative efficacy of conscious sedation agents and dosages for behaviour management in paediatric dentistry.Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 22 February 2018); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2018, Issue 1) in the Cochrane Library (searched 22 February 2018); MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 22 February 2018); and Embase Ovid (1980 to 22

2018 Cochrane PubMed

12. Continuous infusion versus intermittent bolus doses of fentanyl for analgesia and sedation in neonates: an open-label randomised controlled trial

Continuous infusion versus intermittent bolus doses of fentanyl for analgesia and sedation in neonates: an open-label randomised controlled trial Adequate data on fentanyl pharmacokinetics in neonates are lacking. The study was performed to compare serum concentrations and clinical outcome between continuous infusion (CI) and intermittent bolus (IB) doses of fentanyl for analgesia and sedation in neonates.In this open-label randomised controlled trial, neonates requiring 24-48 hours (...) of mechanical ventilation and fentanyl administration were recruited. In CI regimen, 1 mcg/kg loading dose was followed by 1 mcg/kg/hour infusion. In IB regimen, 1mcg/kg/dose was administered every 4 hours.Maximum six blood samples were collected in 48 hours from each baby at prespecified time points for estimating serum fentanyl concentration. Secondary outcomes were pain scores (Neonatal Infant Pain Scale and Neonatal Pain, Agitation and Sedation Scale for acute and ongoing pain, respectively

2018 EvidenceUpdates

13. Nitrous Oxide Compared With Intravenous Sedation for Second-Trimester Abortion: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Nitrous Oxide Compared With Intravenous Sedation for Second-Trimester Abortion: A Randomized Controlled Trial To assess whether inhaled nitrous oxide is noninferior to intravenous (IV) sedation for pain control during outpatient surgical abortion between 12 and 16 weeks of gestation.We enrolled women undergoing surgical abortion at 12-16 weeks of gestation into a multisite, double-blind clinical trial. Participants were randomized to sedation with nitrous oxide (70% nitrous/30% oxygen) or IV (...) fentanyl (100 micrograms) and midazolam (2 mg). Paracervical block was administered to both groups. The primary outcome measure was immediate postabortion recall of maximum pain on a 100-mm visual analog scale.Between August 2016 and March 2017, we assessed 170 women for eligibility and enrolled 39, 19 in the nitrous group and 20 in the IV sedation group. Seven participants in the nitrous group (36.8%) required conversion to IV sedation for inadequate pain control. No participants in the IV sedation

2018 EvidenceUpdates

14. Protocol-directed sedation versus non-protocol-directed sedation in mechanically ventilated intensive care adults and children. (PubMed)

Protocol-directed sedation versus non-protocol-directed sedation in mechanically ventilated intensive care adults and children. The sedation needs of critically ill patients have been recognized as a core component of critical care that is vital to assist recovery and ensure humane treatment. Evidence suggests that sedation requirements are not always optimally managed. Suboptimal sedation, both under- and over-sedation, have been linked to short-term (e.g. length of stay) and long-term (e.g (...) . psychological recovery) outcomes. Strategies to improve sedation assessment and management have been proposed. This review was originally published in 2015 and updated in 2018.To assess the effects of protocol-directed sedation management compared to usual care on the duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital mortality and other patient outcomes in mechanically ventilated ICU adults and children.We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Anaesthesia, Critical

2018 Cochrane

15. CRACKCast E195 – Procedural Sedation and Analgesia

CRACKCast E195 – Procedural Sedation and Analgesia CRACKCast E195 - Procedural Sedation and Analgesia - CanadiEM CRACKCast E195 – Procedural Sedation and Analgesia In , by Owen Scheirer November 5, 2018 This updated episode of CRACKCast cover’s Rosen’s Chapter 004, Procedural Sedation and Analgesia (9th Ed.). These topics are core knowledge that we use every day in the Emergency Department. Shownotes – Key Concepts Safe, effective procedural sedation requires high-level skills and information (...) and sound protocols, including patient monitoring. Patients should be discharged in the company of a responsible adult and should remain with a responsible adult for 4 to 8 hours after recovery and discharge Propofol is the agent of choice for deep sedation in the ED but requires supplementation with an opioid analgesic when a painful procedure is planned. Absence of a pre-procedure fasting period is not a contraindication to procedural sedation for an emergent and/or time-sensitive condition. Pulse

2018 CandiEM

16. Policy for Selecting Anesthesia Providers for the Delivery of Office-based Deep Sedation/General Anesthesia

Policy for Selecting Anesthesia Providers for the Delivery of Office-based Deep Sedation/General Anesthesia AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY ORAL HEALTH POLICIES 139 Purpose The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry ( AAPD) recognizes that it is the exclusive responsibility of dental prac- titioners, when employing anesthesia providers to administer office-based deep sedation/general anesthesia, to verify and carefully review the credentials and experience of those providers. 1 (...) sedation/general anesthesia was provided in a surgical center or hospital-based setting by an anesthesiologist selected and vetted by the facility or insti- tution. The dental surgeon had little, if any, choice as to who would provide these services. Current trends find an increasing number of dental providers electing to complete such care in the confines of their office using the services of an anesthesia provider. 2 Over the last decade, office-based deep sedation/ general anesthesia in the dental

2018 American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

17. Sedation during minimal invasive surfactant therapy: a randomised controlled trial

Sedation during minimal invasive surfactant therapy: a randomised controlled trial Although sedation for endotracheal intubation of infants is widely adopted, there is no consensus whether sedation should be used for minimal invasive surfactant therapy (MIST). We compared, in a randomised controlled setting, the level of stress and comfort of preterm infants during MIST with and without receiving low-dose sedation.Infants between 26 and 36 weeks gestational age were randomised to receive either (...) low-dose sedation (1 mg/kg propofol intravenous) or no premedication during MIST procedure. Standard comfort care was given in both groups, which consisted of administering sucrose in the cheek pouch of the infant and containment. Primary end point was the percentage of infants assessed to be comfortable during the procedure (COMFORTneo-score <14). Secondary parameters included complications of both the MIST procedure and low-dose sedation administration.In total, 78 infants were randomised

2018 EvidenceUpdates

18. Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Procedural Amnesia and Respiratory Depression Between Moderate and Deep Sedation With Propofol in the Emergency Department

Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Procedural Amnesia and Respiratory Depression Between Moderate and Deep Sedation With Propofol in the Emergency Department The objective was to determine if there is a difference in procedural amnesia and adverse respiratory events (AREs) between the target sedation levels of moderate (MS) and deep (DS) procedural sedation.This was a prospective, randomized clinical trial of consenting adult patients planning to undergo DS with propofol between March 5, 2015 (...) , and May 24, 2017. Patients were randomized to a target sedation level of MS or DS using the American Society of Anesthesiologist's definitions. Drug doses, vital signs, observer's assessment of alertness/sedation (OAAS) score, end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2 ), and the need for supportive airway maneuvers (SAMs; bag-valve mask use, repositioning, and stimulation to induce respirations) were monitored continuously. A standardized image was shown every 30 seconds starting 3 minutes before the procedure continuing

2018 EvidenceUpdates

19. Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Pain, Agitation/Sedation, Delirium, Immobility, and Sleep Disruption in Adult Patients in the ICU

Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Pain, Agitation/Sedation, Delirium, Immobility, and Sleep Disruption in Adult Patients in the ICU Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Manageme... : Critical Care Medicine You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Login No user account? Lippincott Journals Subscribers , use your username or email along with your password to log in. Remember me (...) connections included those unable to attend. A formal conflict of interest policy was developed a priori and enforced throughout the process. Teleconferences and electronic discussions among subgroups and whole panel were part of the guidelines ’ development. A general content review was completed face-to-face by all panel members in January 2017. Methods: Content experts, methodologists, and ICU survivors were represented in each of the five sections of the guidelines : Pain , Agitation/ sedation

2018 Society of Critical Care Medicine

20. Effect of Depth of Sedation in Older Patients Undergoing Hip Fracture Repair on Postoperative Delirium: The STRIDE Randomized Clinical Trial (Full text)

Effect of Depth of Sedation in Older Patients Undergoing Hip Fracture Repair on Postoperative Delirium: The STRIDE Randomized Clinical Trial Postoperative delirium is the most common complication following major surgery in older patients. Intraoperative sedation levels are a possible modifiable risk factor for postoperative delirium.To determine whether limiting sedation levels during spinal anesthesia reduces incident delirium overall.This double-blind randomized clinical trial (A Strategy (...) to Reduce the Incidence of Postoperative Delirum in Elderly Patients [STRIDE]) was conducted from November 18, 2011, to May 19, 2016, at a single academic medical center and included a consecutive sample of older patients (≥65 years) who were undergoing nonelective hip fracture repair with spinal anesthesia and propofol sedation. Patients were excluded for preoperative delirium or severe dementia. Of 538 hip fractures screened, 225 patients (41.8%) were eligible, 10 (1.9%) declined participation, 15

2018 EvidenceUpdates PubMed