Latest & greatest articles for rivaroxaban

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Top results for rivaroxaban

1. Rivaroxaban for Thromboprophylaxis in High-Risk Ambulatory Patients with Cancer. (PubMed)

Rivaroxaban for Thromboprophylaxis in High-Risk Ambulatory Patients with Cancer. Ambulatory patients receiving systemic cancer therapy are at varying risk for venous thromboembolism. However, the benefit of thromboprophylaxis in these patients is uncertain.In this double-blind, randomized trial involving high-risk ambulatory patients with cancer (Khorana score of ≥2, on a scale from 0 to 6, with higher scores indicating a higher risk of venous thromboembolism), we randomly assigned patients (...) without deep-vein thrombosis at screening to receive rivaroxaban (at a dose of 10 mg) or placebo daily for up to 180 days, with screening every 8 weeks. The primary efficacy end point was a composite of objectively confirmed proximal deep-vein thrombosis in a lower limb, pulmonary embolism, symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis in an upper limb or distal deep-vein thrombosis in a lower limb, and death from venous thromboembolism and was assessed up to day 180. In a prespecified supportive analysis

2019 NEJM

2. Effectiveness and safety of rivaroxaban vs. warfarin in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and heart failure. (PubMed)

Effectiveness and safety of rivaroxaban vs. warfarin in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation and heart failure. Heart failure (HF) is a common co-morbidity in non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) patients and a potent risk factor for stroke, bleeding, and a decreased time-in-therapeutic range with warfarin. We assessed the real-world effectiveness and safety of rivaroxaban and warfarin in NVAF patients with co-morbid HF.Using US Truven MarketScan Commercial and Medicare (...) supplemental database claims data from 11/2011 to 12/2016, we identified oral anticoagulant (OAC)-naïve NVAF patients with HF (International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes of I50 or I09.81) and ≥12 months of insurance coverage prior to the qualifying OAC dispensing. Rivaroxaban users (20 or 15 mg once daily) were 1:1 propensity score matched to warfarin users, with residual absolute standardized differences <0.1 being achieved for all covariates after matching. Patients were followed up

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2019 ESC heart failure

3. Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) - Co-administered with acetylsalicylic acid for the prevention of atherothrombotic events in adult patients

Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) - Co-administered with acetylsalicylic acid for the prevention of atherothrombotic events in adult patients 1 Published 11 February 2019 1 SMC2128 rivaroxaban 2.5mg film-coated tablet (Xarelto®) Bayer Plc Ltd 11 January 2019 The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has completed its assessment of the above product and advises NHS Boards and Area Drug and Therapeutic Committees (ADTCs) on its use in NHSScotland. The advice is summarised as follows: ADVICE: following a full (...) submission rivaroxaban (Xarelto ® ) is accepted for restricted use within NHSScotland. Indication under review: Co-administered with acetylsalicylic acid for the prevention of atherothrombotic events in adult patients with: - coronary artery disease, or - symptomatic peripheral artery disease at high risk of ischaemic events. SMC restriction: use in patients with stable coronary artery disease that does not require dual antiplatelet therapy. Addition of rivaroxaban to low-dose aspirin (acetylsalicylic

2019 Scottish Medicines Consortium

4. Rivaroxaban, Aspirin, or Both to Prevent Early Coronary Bypass Graft Occlusion: The COMPASS-CABG Study

Rivaroxaban, Aspirin, or Both to Prevent Early Coronary Bypass Graft Occlusion: The COMPASS-CABG Study Patients with recent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery are at risk for early graft failure, which is associated with a risk of myocardial infarction and death. In the COMPASS (Cardiovascular OutcoMes for People Using Anticoagulation StrategieS) trial, rivaroxaban 2.5 mg twice daily plus aspirin 100 mg once daily compared with aspirin 100 mg once daily reduced the primary major (...) adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) outcome of cardiovascular death, stroke, or myocardial infarction. Rivaroxaban 5 mg twice daily alone did not significantly reduce MACE.This pre-planned substudy sought to determine whether the COMPASS treatments are more effective than aspirin alone for preventing graft failure and MACE after CABG surgery.The substudy randomized 1,448 COMPASS trial patients 4 to 14 days after CABG surgery to receive the combination of rivaroxaban plus aspirin, rivaroxaban alone

2019 EvidenceUpdates

5. Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding

Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding Discover Portal Discover Portal Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding Published on 14 February 2018 doi: People (...) with peripheral arterial disease who took rivaroxaban plus aspirin daily over an average of 21 months reduced their risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack or stroke from seven to five in every 100 people treated compared with those given aspirin alone. The rivaroxaban plus aspirin group also reduced their risk of major limb problems or amputation but increased their risk of bleeding from one to two for every hundred people treated. Peripheral arterial disease is a condition in which the arteries

2019 NIHR Dissemination Centre

6. Efficacy of rivaroxaban for pulmonary embolism (PE): an updated systematic review protocol of randomized controlled trial

Efficacy of rivaroxaban for pulmonary embolism (PE): an updated systematic review protocol of randomized controlled trial Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any

2019 PROSPERO

7. Effects of rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban and edoxaban compared to enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis after hip or knee arthroplasty: systematic review and meta-analysis

Effects of rivaroxaban, dabigatran, apixaban and edoxaban compared to enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis after hip or knee arthroplasty: systematic review and meta-analysis Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability

2019 PROSPERO

8. Rivaroxaban or aspirin for patent foramen ovale and embolic stroke of undetermined source: a prespecified subgroup analysis from the NAVIGATE ESUS trial

Rivaroxaban or aspirin for patent foramen ovale and embolic stroke of undetermined source: a prespecified subgroup analysis from the NAVIGATE ESUS trial Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a contributor to embolic stroke of undetermined source (ESUS). Subgroup analyses from previous studies suggest that anticoagulation could reduce recurrent stroke compared with antiplatelet therapy. We hypothesised that anticoagulant treatment with rivaroxaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor, would reduce the risk (...) of recurrent ischaemic stroke compared with aspirin among patients with PFO enrolled in the NAVIGATE ESUS trial.NAVIGATE ESUS was a double-blinded, randomised, phase 3 trial done at 459 centres in 31 countries that assessed the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban versus aspirin for secondary stroke prevention in patients with ESUS. For this prespecified subgroup analysis, cohorts with and without PFO were defined on the basis of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and transoesophageal echocardiography (TOE

2018 EvidenceUpdates

9. Rivaroxaban vs warfarin in high-risk patients with antiphospholipid syndrome

Rivaroxaban vs warfarin in high-risk patients with antiphospholipid syndrome Rivaroxaban is an effective and safe alternative to warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism. We tested the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban compared with warfarin in high-risk patients with thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome. This is a randomized open-label multicenter noninferiority study with blinded end point adjudication. Rivaroxaban, 20 mg once daily (15 mg once daily based (...) on kidney function) was compared with warfarin (international normalized ratio target 2.5) for the prevention of thromboembolic events, major bleeding, and vascular death in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome. Only high-risk patients triple positive for lupus anticoagulant, anti-cardiolipin, and anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies of the same isotype (triple positivity) were included in the study. The trial was terminated prematurely after the enrollment of 120 patients (59 randomized to rivaroxaban

2018 EvidenceUpdates

10. Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: increase in all-cause mortality, thromboembolic and bleeding events in a clinical trial

Rivaroxaban (Xarelto) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: increase in all-cause mortality, thromboembolic and bleeding events in a clinical trial Rivaroxaban (Xarelto▼) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: increase in all-cause mortality, thromboembolic and bleeding events in a clinical trial - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Search Rivaroxaban (Xarelto▼) after transcatheter aortic valve replacement: increase in all-cause mortality, thromboembolic (...) and bleeding events in a clinical trial Rivaroxaban treatment in patients who undergo transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) should be stopped and switched to standard of care. Published 11 October 2018 From: Therapeutic area: , Contents Advice for healthcare professionals: preliminary analysis of a phase 3 clinical trial show risks of all-cause death and bleeding post-TAVR were approximately doubled in patients assigned to a rivaroxaban-based anticoagulation strategy compared with those assigned

2018 MHRA Drug Safety Update

11. Rivaroxaban in Patients with Heart Failure, Sinus Rhythm, and Coronary Disease. (PubMed)

Rivaroxaban in Patients with Heart Failure, Sinus Rhythm, and Coronary Disease. Heart failure is associated with activation of thrombin-related pathways, which predicts a poor prognosis. We hypothesized that treatment with rivaroxaban, a factor Xa inhibitor, could reduce thrombin generation and improve outcomes for patients with worsening chronic heart failure and underlying coronary artery disease.In this double-blind, randomized trial, 5022 patients who had chronic heart failure, a left (...) ventricular ejection fraction of 40% or less, coronary artery disease, and elevated plasma concentrations of natriuretic peptides and who did not have atrial fibrillation were randomly assigned to receive rivaroxaban at a dose of 2.5 mg twice daily or placebo in addition to standard care after treatment for an episode of worsening heart failure. The primary efficacy outcome was the composite of death from any cause, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The principal safety outcome was fatal bleeding

2018 NEJM

12. Rivaroxaban for Thromboprophylaxis after Hospitalization for Medical Illness. (PubMed)

Rivaroxaban for Thromboprophylaxis after Hospitalization for Medical Illness. Patients who are hospitalized for medical illness remain at risk for venous thromboembolism after discharge, but the role of extended thromboprophylaxis in the treatment of such patients is a subject of controversy.In this randomized, double-blind trial, medically ill patients who were at increased risk for venous thromboembolism on the basis of a modified International Medical Prevention Registry on Venous (...) Thromboembolism (IMPROVE) score of 4 or higher (scores range from 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating a higher risk of venous thromboembolism) or a score of 2 or 3 plus a plasma d-dimer level of more than twice the upper limit of the normal range (defined according to local laboratory criteria) were assigned at hospital discharge to either once-daily rivaroxaban at a dose of 10 mg (with the dose adjusted for renal insufficiency) or placebo for 45 days. The primary efficacy outcome was a composite

2018 NEJM

13. Fatal or Irreversible Bleeding and Ischemic Events With Rivaroxaban in Acute Coronary Syndrome

Fatal or Irreversible Bleeding and Ischemic Events With Rivaroxaban in Acute Coronary Syndrome Net clinical outcome analyses of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) mingle fatal or irreversible events with survivable or reversible events that vary significantly in clinical impact.A comparison of efficacy and safety limited to fatal or irreversible ischemic and adverse or seriously harmful events is one way to assess net clinical outcome and risk-benefit overall, given the fact that these events have (...) a similar clinical impact.In the ATLAS ACS 2-TIMI 51 (Anti-Xa Therapy to Lower Cardiovascular Events in Addition to Standard Therapy in Subjects with Acute Coronary Syndrome-Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction) trial of rivaroxaban in the secondary prevention of events among patients with ACS treated with aspirin plus clopidogrel or ticlopidine (clopidogrel/ticlopidine) or aspirin alone, fatal and irreversible efficacy events including nonbleeding cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction

2018 EvidenceUpdates

14. Rivaroxaban

Rivaroxaban Top results for rivaroxaban - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 (...) or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for rivaroxaban The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

15. [EINSTEIN CHOICE: Comparison of rivaroxaban treatment and prophylactic doses with aspirin in the extended treatment of patients with venous thromboembolism]. (PubMed)

[EINSTEIN CHOICE: Comparison of rivaroxaban treatment and prophylactic doses with aspirin in the extended treatment of patients with venous thromboembolism]. Although many patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) may need extended treatment, efficacy and safety issues of full- or lower-intensity anticoagulation over acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) treatment have remained to be determined. EINSTEIN CHOICE is a randomized, double-blind and phase 3 study, and compared either once-daily rivaroxaban (...) of rivaroxaban and in 1.2% of patients receiving 10 mg of rivaroxaban, in comparison to 4.4% of those receiving aspirin (hazard ratio for 20 mg of rivaroxaban vs. ASA, 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.20 to 0.59; hazard ratio for 10 mg of rivaroxaban vs. ASA, 0.26; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.47; P<0.001 for both comparisons). Rates of major bleeding and adverse events were comparable among three treatment groups. In conclusion, in patients with VTE in equipoise for extended anticoagulation, either a treatment dose

2018 Turk Kardiyoloji Dernegi arsivi : Turk Kardiyoloji Derneginin yayin organidir

16. Rivaroxaban for Stroke Prevention after Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source. (PubMed)

Rivaroxaban for Stroke Prevention after Embolic Stroke of Undetermined Source. Embolic strokes of undetermined source represent 20% of ischemic strokes and are associated with a high rate of recurrence. Anticoagulant treatment with rivaroxaban, an oral factor Xa inhibitor, may result in a lower risk of recurrent stroke than aspirin.We compared the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban (at a daily dose of 15 mg) with aspirin (at a daily dose of 100 mg) for the prevention of recurrent stroke (...) in patients with recent ischemic stroke that was presumed to be from cerebral embolism but without arterial stenosis, lacune, or an identified cardioembolic source. The primary efficacy outcome was the first recurrence of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke or systemic embolism in a time-to-event analysis; the primary safety outcome was the rate of major bleeding.A total of 7213 participants were enrolled at 459 sites; 3609 patients were randomly assigned to receive rivaroxaban and 3604 to receive aspirin

2018 NEJM

17. Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding

Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding Discover Portal Discover Portal Rivaroxaban plus aspirin may reduce heart attack and strokes in people with peripheral arterial disease, but with an added risk of bleeding Published on 14 February 2018 doi: People (...) with peripheral arterial disease who took rivaroxaban plus aspirin daily over an average of 21 months reduced their risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack or stroke from seven to five in every 100 people treated compared with those given aspirin alone. The rivaroxaban plus aspirin group also reduced their risk of major limb problems or amputation but increased their risk of bleeding from one to two for every hundred people treated. Peripheral arterial disease is a condition in which the arteries

2018 NIHR Dissemination Centre

18. Inhibitory mechanisms of very low–dose rivaroxaban in non–ST-elevation myocardial infarction (PubMed)

Inhibitory mechanisms of very low–dose rivaroxaban in non–ST-elevation myocardial infarction Very low-dose (VLD) factor Xa (FXa) inhibition, in combination with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and clopidogrel, is associated with improved outcomes in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with a tolerable bleeding risk profile. To date, there are no data documenting platelet inhibition and the anticoagulatory effects of VLD FXa inhibition on top of guideline-adherent dual-antiplatelet (...) therapy (DAPT) in patients with ACS. Patients with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) receiving oral DAPT (ASA + clopidogrel, n = 20; or ASA + ticagrelor, n = 20) were prospectively enrolled in a nonrandomized study. Coagulation- and platelet-dependent thrombin generation (TG), measured by means of the calibrated automated thrombogram, were significantly decreased after in vitro and in vivo addition of rivaroxaban. As shown by a total thrombus-formation analysis approach, rivaroxaban

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2018 Blood advances

19. Aspirin or Rivaroxaban for VTE Prophylaxis after Hip or Knee Arthroplasty. (PubMed)

Aspirin or Rivaroxaban for VTE Prophylaxis after Hip or Knee Arthroplasty. Clinical trials and meta-analyses have suggested that aspirin may be effective for the prevention of venous thromboembolism (proximal deep-vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism) after total hip or total knee arthroplasty, but comparisons with direct oral anticoagulants are lacking for prophylaxis beyond hospital discharge.We performed a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial involving patients who were (...) undergoing total hip or knee arthroplasty. All the patients received once-daily oral rivaroxaban (10 mg) until postoperative day 5 and then were randomly assigned to continue rivaroxaban or switch to aspirin (81 mg daily) for an additional 9 days after total knee arthroplasty or for 30 days after total hip arthroplasty. Patients were followed for 90 days for symptomatic venous thromboembolism (the primary effectiveness outcome) and bleeding complications, including major or clinically relevant nonmajor

2018 NEJM

20. Rivaroxaban dose adjustment using thrombin generation in severe congenital protein C deficiency and warfarin-induced skin necrosis (PubMed)

Rivaroxaban dose adjustment using thrombin generation in severe congenital protein C deficiency and warfarin-induced skin necrosis 29365322 2019 01 30 2019 01 30 2473-9537 2 2 2018 01 23 Blood advances Blood Adv Rivaroxaban dose adjustment using thrombin generation in severe congenital protein C deficiency and warfarin-induced skin necrosis. 142-145 10.1182/bloodadvances.2017012047 Menon Neethu N Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, and. Sarode Ravi R Department (...) of Pathology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX. Zia Ayesha A 0000-0003-3283-0415 Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, and. eng K23 HL132054 HL NHLBI NIH HHS United States Case Reports Journal Article Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural United States Blood Adv 101698425 2473-9529 0 Protein C 0 Thrombomodulin 5Q7ZVV76EI Warfarin 9NDF7JZ4M3 Rivaroxaban EC 3.4.21.5 Thrombin IM Adolescent Female Humans Necrosis chemically induced pathology prevention

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2018 Blood advances