Latest & greatest articles for physiotherapy

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Top results for physiotherapy

181. One-year follow-up comparison of the cost and effectiveness of chiropractic and physiotherapy as primary management for back pain: subgroup analysis, recurrence, and additional health care utilization

One-year follow-up comparison of the cost and effectiveness of chiropractic and physiotherapy as primary management for back pain: subgroup analysis, recurrence, and additional health care utilization One-year follow-up comparison of the cost and effectiveness of chiropractic and physiotherapy as primary management for back pain: subgroup analysis, recurrence, and additional health care utilization One-year follow-up comparison of the cost and effectiveness of chiropractic and physiotherapy (...) between effectiveness and cost data The costing was undertaken on the same patient sample as that used in the effectiveness study. The costing was carried out prospectively alongside the effectiveness study. Study sample 323 patients aged 18-60 years were randomised to receive chiropractic treatment (n=179) or physiotherapy (n=144). Only patients were included who had not received active treatment for their problems within the past month, had no contraindication to manipulation, had no other disease

1998 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

182. Therapeutic ultrasound in physiotherapy

Therapeutic ultrasound in physiotherapy Therapeutic ultrasound in physiotherapy Therapeutic ultrasound in physiotherapy Bryant J, Milne R Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Bryant J, Milne R. Therapeutic ultrasound in physiotherapy. Southampton: Wessex Institute for Health Research and Development (WIHRD) 1998 Authors (...) ' objectives To assess the cost-effectiveness of therapeutic ultrasound in physiotherapy. Authors' conclusions Therapeutic ultrasound is extensively used by physiotherapists and is popular with patients. There is limited clinical research support for using it and the literature on the effectiveness of ultrasound in physiotherapy is inconclusive. Absence of evidence of effect does, however, not mean evidence of lack of effect. The committee expressed concern about the variability of machine calibration

1998 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

183. Comparison of physiotherapy, manipulation, and corticosteroid injection for treating shoulder complaints in general practice: randomised, single blind study. (Full text)

Comparison of physiotherapy, manipulation, and corticosteroid injection for treating shoulder complaints in general practice: randomised, single blind study. To compare the efficacy of physiotherapy, manipulation, and corticosteroid injection for treating patients with shoulder complaints in general practice.Randomised, single blind study.Seven general practices in the Netherlands.198 patients with shoulder complaints, of whom 172 were divided, on the basis of physical examination, into two (...) diagnostic groups: a shoulder girdle group (n = 58) and a synovial group (n = 114).Patients in the shoulder girdle group were randomised to manipulation or physiotherapy, and patients in the synovial group were randomised to corticosteroid injection, manipulation, or physiotherapy.Duration of shoulder complaints analysed by survival analysis.In the shoulder girdle group duration of complaints was significantly shorter after manipulation compared with physiotherapy (P < 0.001). Also the number of patients

1997 BMJ PubMed

184. Physiotherapy for patients with soft tissue shoulder disorders: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials. (Full text)

Physiotherapy for patients with soft tissue shoulder disorders: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials. To assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy for patients with soft tissue shoulder disorders.A systematic computerised literature search of Medline and Embase, supplemented with citation tracking, for relevant trials with random allocation published before 1996.Patients treated with physiotherapy for disorders of soft tissue of the shoulder.Success rates, mobility, pain (...) . Four other trials favoured physiotherapy (laser therapy or manipulation), but the validity of their methods was unsatisfactory.There is evidence that ultrasound therapy is ineffective in the treatment of soft tissue shoulder disorders. Due to small trial sizes and unsatisfactory methods, evidence for the effectiveness of other methods of physiotherapy is inconclusive. For all methods of treatment, trials were too heterogeneous with respect to included patients, index and reference treatments

1997 BMJ PubMed

185. Cost and effectiveness analysis of chiropractic and physiotherapy treatment for low back and neck pain: six-month follow-up

Cost and effectiveness analysis of chiropractic and physiotherapy treatment for low back and neck pain: six-month follow-up Cost and effectiveness analysis of chiropractic and physiotherapy treatment for low back and neck pain: six-month follow-up Cost and effectiveness analysis of chiropractic and physiotherapy treatment for low back and neck pain: six-month follow-up Skargren E I, Oberg B E, Carlsson P G, Gade M Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets (...) for inclusion in the study sample, a total of 38% were found to be ineligible. Another 146 patients refused to participate in the study before randomisation. Initially, 411 patients were randomly assigned to either the chiropractor group (n=219) or to the physiotherapy group (n=192); after exclusion of those who withdrew after randomisation, 323 patients participated in the trial, 179 in the chiropractor group with a mean (SD) age of 41.4 (11.6) years and 144 in the physiotherapy group with a mean (SD) age

1997 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

186. Physiotherapy for patients with soft tissue shoulder disorders: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials

Physiotherapy for patients with soft tissue shoulder disorders: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials Physiotherapy for patients with soft tissue shoulder disorders: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials Physiotherapy for patients with soft tissue shoulder disorders: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials van der Heijden G J, van der Windt D A, de Winter A F Authors' objectives To assess the effectiveness of physiotherapy for patients with soft tissue shoulder (...) disorders. Searching MEDLINE was searched from 1966 to 1995, and EMBASE from 1984 to 1995, using a predefined search strategy. In addition, citations were tracked for studies published before 1996. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review Studies were included if they met five criteria: (1) patients had shoulder pain at inclusion; (2) treatments were allocated by a random procedure; (3) at least one of the treatments included physiotherapy; (4) success rate, pain, mobility

1997 DARE.

187. Physiotherapy after stroke: more is better?

Physiotherapy after stroke: more is better? Physiotherapy after stroke: more is better? Physiotherapy after stroke: more is better? Langhorne P, Wagenaar R, Partridge C Authors' objectives To determine whether more intensive physiotherapy produces greater benefit in reducing disability after stroke. Searching Searches were made, up to February 1995, of MEDLINE (using an expanded strategy), the Ottawa Stroke Trials Registry of 21 core neurology and stroke journals, the bibliographies of relevant (...) articles and reviews and the proceedings of recent conferences in stroke, neurology and geriatric medicine. Published and unpublished studies were sought. Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of physiotherapy after stroke were included. Excluded were trials comparing organisationally-different stroke services and trials comparing different physiotherapy techniques. Specific interventions included in the review Interventions

1996 DARE.

188. Randomised clinical trial of manipulative therapy and physiotherapy for persistent back and neck complaints: results of one year follow up. (Full text)

Randomised clinical trial of manipulative therapy and physiotherapy for persistent back and neck complaints: results of one year follow up. To compare the effectiveness of manipulative therapy, physiotherapy, treatment by the general practitioner, and placebo therapy in patients with persistent non-specific back and neck complaints.Randomised clinical trial.Primary health care in the Netherlands.256 patients with non-specific back and neck complaints of at least six weeks' duration who had (...) not received physiotherapy or manipulative therapy in the past two years.At the discretion of the manipulative therapists, physiotherapists, and general practitioners. Physiotherapy consisted of exercises, massage, and physical therapy (heat, electrotherapy, ultrasound, shortwave diathermy). Manipulative therapy consisted of manipulation and mobilisation of the spine. Treatment by general practitioners consisted of drugs (for example, analgesics), advice about posture, home exercises, and (bed)rest

1992 BMJ PubMed

189. Physiotherapy intervention late after stroke and mobility. (Full text)

Physiotherapy intervention late after stroke and mobility. To determine whether the intervention of a physiotherapist improved mobility in patients seen more than one year after stroke.Randomised crossover trial comparing two groups offered intervention by a physiotherapist, one immediately after entry into the trial and the other after a delay of three months. The intervention consisted of identifying problems and offering advice and help to solve the problems.Patients' homes (...) the trial and 49 were randomised to immediate and 45 to delayed physiotherapy; 89 were compared at the crossover point. At randomisation the two groups were comparable. At three months the group given early therapy showed an improvement in gait speed whereas the untreated group had declined (differences of -3.9 v 6.4 s to walk 10 m; p less than 0.01); between three and six months the group given delayed therapy showed improvement and the previously treated group declined (differences of 6.5 v -3.9 s

1992 BMJ PubMed

190. Incentive spirometry versus routine chest physiotherapy for prevention of pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. (PubMed)

Incentive spirometry versus routine chest physiotherapy for prevention of pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. We entered 876 patients into a clinical trial aimed at preventing pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. Patients either received conventional chest physiotherapy or were encouraged to perform maximal inspiratory manoeuvres for 5 min during each hour while awake, using an incentive spirometer. The incidence of pulmonary complications did not differ significantly (...) between the groups: incentive spirometry 68 of 431 (15.8%, 95% CI 14.0-17.6%), and chest physiotherapy 68 of 445 (15.3%, CI 13.6-17.0%). Nor was there a difference between the groups in the incidence of positive clinical signs, pyrexia, abnormal chest radiographs, pathogens in sputum, respiratory failure (PO2 less than 60 mm Hg), or length of stay in hospital. We conclude that prophylactic incentive spirometry and chest physiotherapy are of equivalent clinical efficacy in the general management

1991 Lancet

191. Cost-effectiveness study of outpatient physiotherapy after medial meniscectomy

Cost-effectiveness study of outpatient physiotherapy after medial meniscectomy Cost-effectiveness study of outpatient physiotherapy after medial meniscectomy Cost-effectiveness study of outpatient physiotherapy after medial meniscectomy Forster D P, Frost C E Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical (...) assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Outpatient physiotherapy. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Men aged 16-45 years. Setting The study was carried out in the United Kingdom. Dates to which data relate Price related to 1976. Source of effectiveness data Single study. Study sample It is unknown whether there is evidence that the study sample is representative of the clinical study question

1982 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

192. Multicentre trial of physiotherapy in the management of sciatic symptoms. (PubMed)

Multicentre trial of physiotherapy in the management of sciatic symptoms. Four treatments for sciatic symptoms--traction, exercises, manipulation, and corset--were assessed in a randomised controlled trial in 322 outpatients. The design was factorial. There were thus sixteen treatment groups, enabling a comparison of combinations of methods as well as of individual methods. Treatment lasted for four weeks. Patients were reviewed at the end of this period and at four and sixteen months after (...) in combination. This was complemented by a clear tendency for those who had received fewer types of treatment during the trial to have further treatment in the ensuing three months. There were no beneficial effects of treatment detectable at four or sixteen months. In the short-term, active physiotherapy with several treatments appears to be of value in the outpatient management of patients with sciatic symptoms, but it does not seem to confer any longer-term benefit.

1981 Lancet

193. Efficacy of chest physiotherapy and intermittent positive-pressure breathing in the resolution of pneumonia. (PubMed)

Efficacy of chest physiotherapy and intermittent positive-pressure breathing in the resolution of pneumonia. We undertook a randomized clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of chest physiotherapy and intermittent positive-pressure breathing in the treatment of pneumonia. The diagnosis of pneumonia required a compatible clinical history and x-ray confirmation. A total of 54 patients were assigned to treatment and control groups and were similar in age, smoking history, underlying lung disease (...) and prior antibiotic treatment. Antibiotic therapy, guided by Gram stain and sputum and blood cultures, was similar in both groups. Chest physiotherapy, consisting of postural drainage, percussion and vibration, was given concurrently with intermittent positive-pressure breathing with use of racemic epinephrine every four hours. There was no statistically significant difference in duration of fever, extent of radiographic clearing, duration of hospital stay and mortality between the control and treated

1978 NEJM