Latest & greatest articles for palliative care

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Top results for palliative care

121. Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care. (PubMed)

Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane Review published in Issue 4, 2013, on Levomepromazine for nausea and vomiting in palliative care.Nausea and vomiting are common, distressing symptoms for patients receiving palliative care. There are several drugs which can be used to treat these symptoms, known as antiemetics. Levomepromazine is an antipsychotic drug is commonly used as an antiemetic to alleviate nausea and vomiting (...) in palliative care settings.To evaluate the efficacy of, and adverse events associated with, levomepromazine for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients.For this update we searched electronic databases, including those of Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE, up to February 2015. We searched clinical trial registers on 7 October 2015 for ongoing trials.Randomised controlled trials of levomepromazine for the treatment of nausea or vomiting

2015 Cochrane

122. Strategies to promote coping and resilience in oncology and palliative care nurses caring for adult patients with malignancy: a comprehensive systematic review. (PubMed)

Strategies to promote coping and resilience in oncology and palliative care nurses caring for adult patients with malignancy: a comprehensive systematic review. Cancer care nursing is perceived as personally and professionally demanding. Developing effective coping skills and resilience has been associated with better health and wellbeing for nurses, work longevity and improved quality of patient care.The objective of this systematic review was to identify personal and organizational strategies (...) that promote coping and resilience in oncology and palliative care nurses caring for adult patients with malignancy.The search strategy identified published and unpublished studies from 2007 to 2013. Individual search strategies were developed for the 12 databases accessed and search alerts established. The review considered qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods studies that assessed personal or organizational interventions, programs or strategies that promoted coping and resilience. These included

2015 JBI database of systematic reviews and implementation reports

123. Palliative care experiences of adult cancer patients from ethnocultural groups: a qualitative systematic review protocol. (PubMed)

Palliative care experiences of adult cancer patients from ethnocultural groups: a qualitative systematic review protocol. The objective of this review is to synthesize the best available evidence on palliative care experiences of adult cancer patients from ethnocultural groups.More specifically, this systematic review seeks to answer the following questions:1. What are the palliative care experiences of adult cancer patients from diverse ethnocultural groups?2. What meanings do adult patients (...) with cancer from diverse ethnocultural groups assign to their experiences with palliative care?Globally, over 20.4 million people need palliative care services annually. The majority of these people (19 million) are adults, with 34% of them being patients diagnosed with cancer. With the current increase in the aging population, especially in developed countries, the number of adults requiring palliative care is expected to rise. Furthermore, how palliative care is offered and received continues

2015 JBI database of systematic reviews and implementation reports

124. Palliative Care for the Seriously Ill. (Full text)

Palliative Care for the Seriously Ill. 26287850 2015 08 25 2018 11 13 1533-4406 373 8 2015 Aug 20 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Palliative Care for the Seriously Ill. 747-55 10.1056/NEJMra1404684 Kelley Amy S AS Morrison R Sean RS eng K23 AG040774 AG NIA NIH HHS United States K24 AG022345 AG NIA NIH HHS United States P30 AG028741 AG NIA NIH HHS United States R24 AG044300 AG NIA NIH HHS United States Journal Article Review United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 AIM (...) IM N Engl J Med. 2015 Nov 26;373(22):2188-9 26605940 N Engl J Med. 2015 Nov 26;373(22):2188 26605939 Critical Illness psychology therapy Hospice Care Humans Long-Term Care Palliative Care standards Practice Guidelines as Topic Spirituality United States 2015 8 20 6 0 2015 8 20 6 0 2015 8 26 6 0 ppublish 26287850 10.1056/NEJMra1404684 PMC4671283 NIHMS736777 JAMA. 2004 Jan 7;291(1):88-93 14709580 Natl Vital Stat Rep. 2012 Oct 10;61(6):1-51 24984457 Palliat Med. 2005 Apr;19(3):228-33 15920937 J Pain

2015 NEJM PubMed

125. Training and supportive programs for palliative care volunteers in community settings. (Full text)

Training and supportive programs for palliative care volunteers in community settings. Palliative care is specialised health care to support people living with a terminal illness and their families. The involvement of volunteers can extend the range of activities offered by palliative care services, particularly for those living in the community. Activities undertaken by palliative care volunteers vary considerably but can be practical, social or emotional in nature. The types of training (...) and support provided to these volunteers are likely to affect the volunteers' effectiveness in their role and influence the quality of care provided to palliative care clients and their families. Training and support can also have considerable resource implications for palliative care organisations, which makes it important to know how to provide this training and support as effectively as possible.To assess the effects of training and support strategies for palliative care volunteers on palliative care

2015 Cochrane PubMed

126. Palliative care for patients with advanced fibrotic lung disease: a randomised controlled phase II and feasibility trial of a community case conference intervention (Full text)

Palliative care for patients with advanced fibrotic lung disease: a randomised controlled phase II and feasibility trial of a community case conference intervention Those affected by advanced fibrotic interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) have considerable unmet symptom and psychological needs. Case conferencing has been proposed to address these issues, but requires evaluation.To obtain preliminary information on the impact of a case conference intervention delivered in the home (Hospital2Home (...) ) on palliative care concerns of patients and their carers, and to evaluate feasibility and acceptability.Hospital2Home was trialled at a specialist centre using a Phase II fast-track randomised controlled trial with qualitative interviews. The primary outcome for effect was mean change from baseline of Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS) (a measure of symptoms and concerns) at 4 weeks. Secondary outcomes included symptom control, quality of life, consent and recruitment rates and percentage of patients

2015 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

127. [Information brief concerning palliative care day centres]

[Information brief concerning palliative care day centres] Avis sur les centres de jour en soins palliatifs [Information brief concerning palliative care day centres] Avis sur les centres de jour en soins palliatifs [Information brief concerning palliative care day centres] Auclair Y, Hernandez Hurtado E, Fournier M Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made (...) for the HTA database. Citation Auclair Y, Hernandez Hurtado E, Fournier M. Avis sur les centres de jour en soins palliatifs. [Information brief concerning palliative care day centres] Quebec: Institut national d'excellence en sante et en services sociaux (INESSS). ETMIS 2015; 11(2). 2015 Authors' conclusions Although some evidence suggests that attending a PCDC may be beneficial for patients, the data do not enable determination of: (1) the contribution of PCDCs to management of symptoms or to improvement

2015 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

128. Pharmacological treatments for fatigue associated with palliative care. (Full text)

Pharmacological treatments for fatigue associated with palliative care. This review updates the original review, 'Pharmacological treatments for fatigue associated with palliative care' and also incorporates the review 'Drug therapy for the management of cancer-related fatigue'.In healthy individuals, fatigue is a protective response to physical or mental stress, often relieved by rest. By contrast, in palliative care patients' fatigue can be severely debilitating and is often not counteracted (...) in palliative care, with a focus on patients at an advanced stage of disease, including patients with cancer and other chronic diseases.For this update, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, PsycINFO and EMBASE, and a selection of cancer journals up to 28 April 2014. We searched the references of identified articles and contacted authors to obtain unreported data. To validate the search strategy we selected sentinel references.We considered randomised controlled

2015 Cochrane PubMed

129. Laxatives for the management of constipation in people receiving palliative care. (Full text)

Laxatives for the management of constipation in people receiving palliative care. This article describes the second update of a Cochrane review on the effectiveness of laxatives for the management of constipation in people receiving palliative care. Previous versions were published in 2006 and 2010 where we also evaluated trials of methylnaltrexone; these trials have been removed as they are included in another review in press. In these earlier versions, we drew no conclusions on individual (...) effectiveness of different laxatives because of the limited number of evaluations. This is despite constipation being common in palliative care, generating considerable suffering due to the unpleasant physical symptoms and the availability of a wide range of laxatives with known differences in effect in other populations.To determine the effectiveness and differential efficacy of laxatives used to manage constipation in people receiving palliative care.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled

2015 Cochrane PubMed

130. Dignity-conserving care in palliative care settings: An integrative review (PubMed)

Dignity-conserving care in palliative care settings: An integrative review To report an integrative review of evidence relating to dignity-conserving care in palliative care settings. It will also suggest avenues for future research.Research suggests that dignity is welcomed by those receiving palliative and end of life care. However, as dignity is a subjective term, it is not always explicit how this may be employed by nurses. Given that the preferred place of care for patients with palliative (...) care needs is the home, the issue of dignity may be particularly important for community nurses. Therefore, synthesising evidence of dignity-conserving care for community nurses caring for people with palliative care needs provides clarity in a complex area of palliative care research.Integrative literature review.The review involved key bibliographic and review databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ASSIA and PsycInfo. Medical Subject Headings and free terms were undertaken for articles published from

2015 EvidenceUpdates

132. Quantitative study?other: An online learning module improves specialist palliative care nurses? pain assessments and patient-reported pain

Quantitative study?other: An online learning module improves specialist palliative care nurses? pain assessments and patient-reported pain An online learning module improves specialist palliative care nurses’ pain assessments and patient-reported pain | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log (...) in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here An online learning module improves specialist palliative care nurses’ pain assessments and patient-reported pain Article Text Nursing issues

2015 Evidence-Based Nursing

133. Systematic review: Non-cancer palliative care in the community needs greater interprofessional collaboration to maintain coordinated care and manage uncertainty

Systematic review: Non-cancer palliative care in the community needs greater interprofessional collaboration to maintain coordinated care and manage uncertainty Non-cancer palliative care in the community needs greater interprofessional collaboration to maintain coordinated care and manage uncertainty | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more (...) about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Non-cancer palliative care in the community needs greater interprofessional collaboration

2015 Evidence-Based Nursing

134. Silent night: retrospective database study assessing possibility of "weekend effect" in palliative care. (Full text)

Silent night: retrospective database study assessing possibility of "weekend effect" in palliative care. To compare the mortality of patients in a palliative care unit on working days with that on weekends and public holidays.Retrospective database study.Palliative care unit in Germany.All admissions to palliative care unit between 1 January 1997 and 31 December 2008.The impact of day type (working days or weekends and public holidays) on mortality was analysed using Poisson regression models.A (...) total of 2565 admitted patients and 1325 deaths were recorded. Of the deaths, 448 (33.8%) occurred on weekends and public holidays. The mortality rate on weekends and public holidays was 18% higher than that on working days (mortality rate ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.32; P=0.005).Patients in the palliative care unit were at higher risk of dying on weekends and public holidays. In the absence of a prospective study, the exact reasons for this correlation are unclear.© Voltz et al

2014 BMJ PubMed

135. Droperidol for treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients. (Full text)

Droperidol for treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 10, 2010, on droperidol for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients. Nausea and vomiting are common symptoms in patients with terminal illness and can be very unpleasant and distressing. There are several different types of antiemetic treatments that can be used to control these symptoms. Droperidol (...) is an antipsychotic drug and has been used and studied as an antiemetic in the management of postoperative and chemotherapy nausea and vomiting.To evaluate the efficacy and adverse events (both minor and serious) associated with the use of droperidol for the treatment of nausea and vomiting in palliative care patients.We searched electronic databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE (1950-), EMBASE (1980-), CINAHL (1981-) and AMED (1985-), using relevant search terms and synonyms. The basic search strategy

2014 Cochrane PubMed

136. Putting the Heart into Palliative Care

Putting the Heart into Palliative Care Putting the Heart into Palliative Care - Evidently Cochrane Search and hit Go By October 10, 2014 // In the last of our special series of guest blogs for Hospice Care Week, GP Richard Lehman considers palliative care for people with heart failure and the need for good care based on the patient’s goals at the end of life, whatever their mode of dying. Stewart S, MacIntyre K, Hole DJ, Capewell S, McMurray JJ More “malignant” than cancer? Five-year survival (...) following a first admission with heart failure. Eur J Heart Fail 2001;3:315-22 Looking through the Palliative Care section of the Cochrane Library, you will find a great wealth of reviews, from the very general to the very specific. Almost all of them relate to dying from cancer. Most people, however, die from conditions other than cancer; and conversely most people with cancer do not die from it. The average age of patients in acute medical hospital wards is now 80 or over, and the commonest cause

2014 Evidently Cochrane

137. Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines

Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database (...) . Citation CADTH. Fentanyl transdermal patches in palliative care: clinical effectiveness, safety, and guidelines. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response - Summary of Abstracts. 2014 Authors' conclusions Two evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of fentanyl transdermal patches for pain relief in palliative care patients were identified. Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Administration, Cutaneous; Fentanyls

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

138. Impact of community based, specialist palliative care teams on hospitalisations and emergency department visits late in life and hospital deaths: a pooled analysis. (Full text)

Impact of community based, specialist palliative care teams on hospitalisations and emergency department visits late in life and hospital deaths: a pooled analysis. To determine the pooled effect of exposure to one of 11 specialist palliative care teams providing services in patients' homes.Pooled analysis of a retrospective cohort study.Ontario, Canada.3109 patients who received care from specialist palliative care teams in 2009-11 (exposed) matched by propensity score to 3109 patients who (...) received usual care (unexposed).The palliative care teams studied served different geographies and varied in team composition and size but had the same core team members and role: a core group of palliative care physicians, nurses, and family physicians who provide integrated palliative care to patients in their homes. The teams' role was to manage symptoms, provide education and care, coordinate services, and be available without interruption regardless of time or day.Patients (a) being in hospital

2014 BMJ PubMed

139. Fentanyl Transdermal Patches in Palliative Care: Clinical Effectiveness, Safety, and Guidelines

Fentanyl Transdermal Patches in Palliative Care: Clinical Effectiveness, Safety, and Guidelines TITLE: Fentanyl Transdermal Patches in Palliative Care: Clinical Effectiveness, Safety, and Guidelines DATE: 29 May 2014 RESEARCH QUESTIONS 1. What is the clinical effectiveness and safety of fentanyl transdermal patches for pain relief in palliative care patients? 2. What are the evidence-based guidelines for the use of fentanyl transdermal patches for pain relief in palliative care patients? KEY (...) MESSAGE Two evidence-based guidelines regarding the use of fentanyl transdermal patches for pain relief in palliative care patients were identified. METHODS A limited literature search was conducted on key resources including PubMed, The Cochrane Library (2014, Issue 5), University of York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) databases, Canadian and major international health technology agencies, as well as a focused Internet search. No methodological filters were applied to limit retrieval

2014 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

140. Medically assisted nutrition for adult palliative care patients. (PubMed)

Medically assisted nutrition for adult palliative care patients. Many palliative care patients have a reduced oral intake during their illness. The management of this can include the provision of medically assisted nutrition with the aim of prolonging the length of life of a patient, improving their quality of life, or both. This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2008.To determine the effect of medically assisted nutrition on the quality and length (...) of life of palliative care patients.We identified studies from searching Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, CANCERLIT, Caresearch, Dissertation abstracts, SCIENCE CITATION INDEX and the reference lists of all eligible trials, key textbooks and previous systematic reviews. The date of the latest search was 26 March 2014.All relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or prospective controlled trials (if no RCTs were found).We found no RCTs

2014 Cochrane