Latest & greatest articles for opioid

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Top results for opioid

1. Fentanyl (Actiq and other brands) and other opioids: risk of increased pain

Fentanyl (Actiq and other brands) and other opioids: risk of increased pain Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Fentanyl (Actiq° and other brands) and other opioids: risk of increased pain'', 1 July 2019 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Fentanyl (Actiq° and other brands) and other opioids: risk of increased pain Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight (...) Fentanyl (Actiq° and other brands) and other opioids: risk of increased pain Paradoxically, fentanyl, like other opioids, can exacerbate the pain it is intended to relieve. In 2018, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) reported 16 cases of hyperalgesia (severe pain) in patients taking transmucosal fentanyl. Hyperalgesia is a known adverse effect of opioids. The key symptom is an increase in the intensity of pain felt, an increase associated with the effects of the opioid. It is difficult to distinguish

2019 Prescrire

2. Association of Opioid Overdose With Opioid Prescriptions to Family Members

Association of Opioid Overdose With Opioid Prescriptions to Family Members Prescription opioid misuse is a public health problem that leads to overdose. Although existing interventions focus on limiting prescribing to patients at high risk, individuals may still access prescription opioids dispensed to family members.To determine whether opioid prescriptions to family members were associated with overdose for individuals who themselves did not have an opioid prescription.We conducted a 1:4 (...) matched case-control study using health care utilization data from 2004 through 2015 from a large US commercial insurance company. Eligible individuals were required to have at least 12 months of continuous enrollment and 1 or more family members in the database. Individuals who experienced overdose were identified by their first opioid overdose after the baseline period and matched to control participants by time in the database, calendar time, age, sex, and number of individuals in the family unit

2019 EvidenceUpdates

3. Patterns of Opioid Administration Among Opioid-Naive Inpatients and Associations With Postdischarge Opioid Use: A Cohort Study. (PubMed)

Patterns of Opioid Administration Among Opioid-Naive Inpatients and Associations With Postdischarge Opioid Use: A Cohort Study. Patterns of inpatient opioid use and their associations with postdischarge opioid use are poorly understood.To measure patterns in timing, duration, and setting of opioid administration in opioid-naive hospitalized patients and to examine associations with postdischarge use.Retrospective cohort study using electronic health record data from 2010 to 2014.12 community (...) and academic hospitals in Pennsylvania.148 068 opioid-naive patients (191 249 admissions) with at least 1 outpatient encounter within 12 months before and after admission.Number of days and patterns of inpatient opioid use; any outpatient use (self-report and/or prescription orders) 90 and 365 days after discharge.Opioids were administered in 48% of admissions. Patients were given opioids for a mean of 67.9% (SD, 25.0%) of their stay. Location of administration of first opioid on admission, timing of last

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

4. Access to Office-Based Buprenorphine Treatment in Areas With High Rates of Opioid-Related Mortality: An Audit Study. (PubMed)

Access to Office-Based Buprenorphine Treatment in Areas With High Rates of Opioid-Related Mortality: An Audit Study. Improving access to treatment for opioid use disorder is a national priority, but little is known about the barriers encountered by patients seeking buprenorphine-naloxone ("buprenorphine") treatment.To assess real-world access to buprenorphine treatment for uninsured or Medicaid-covered patients reporting current heroin use.Audit survey ("secret shopper" study).6 U.S (...) . jurisdictions with a high burden of opioid-related mortality (Massachusetts, Maryland, New Hampshire, West Virginia, Ohio, and the District of Columbia).From July to November 2018, callers contacted 546 publicly listed buprenorphine prescribers twice, posing as uninsured or Medicaid-covered patients seeking buprenorphine treatment.Rates of new appointments offered, whether buprenorphine prescription was possible at the first visit, and wait times.Among 1092 contacts with 546 clinicians, schedulers were

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

5. Is Low-Dose Ketamine an Effective Alternative to Opioids for Acute Pain? (Full text)

Is Low-Dose Ketamine an Effective Alternative to Opioids for Acute Pain? Is Low-Dose Ketamine an Effective Alternative to Opioids for Acute Pain? - Annals of Emergency Medicine Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search Terms Search within Search Share this page Access provided by Volume 73, Issue 5, Pages e47–e49 Is Low-Dose Ketamine an Effective Alternative to Opioids for Acute Pain? x Jonathan M. Kirschner , MD (EBEM Commentator) , x Benton R. Hunter , MD (EBEM Commentator) Department (...) or an adjudicator. Included studies were randomized trials of low-dose intravenous ketamine less than or equal to 0.5 mg/kg compared with intravenous opioids in adult ED patients with acute pain (≤1 week’s duration). Studies had to report a change in either a visual analog scale or numeric rating scale score within 60 minutes. Data Extraction and Synthesis Mean visual analog scale or numeric rating scale score, mean changes, and SDs were abstracted for all points less than or equal to 120 minutes, although

2019 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots PubMed

6. Incidence of mortality due to rebound toxicity after 'treat and release' practices in prehospital opioid overdose care: a systematic review

Incidence of mortality due to rebound toxicity after 'treat and release' practices in prehospital opioid overdose care: a systematic review Death due to opioid overdose was declared a public health crisis in Canada in 2015. Traditionally, patients who have overdosed on opioids that are managed by emergency medical services (EMS) are treated with the opioid antagonist naloxone, provided ventilatory support and subsequently transported to hospital. However, certain EMS agencies have permitted (...) patients who have been reversed from opioid overdose to refuse transport, if the patient exhibits capacity to do so. Evidence on the safety of this practice is limited. Therefore, our intent was to examine the available literature to determine mortality and serious adverse events within 48 hours of EMS treat and release due to suspected rebound opioid toxicity after naloxone administration.A systematic search was performed on 11 May 2017 in PubMed, Cochrane Central, Embase and CINHAL. Studies

2019 EvidenceUpdates

7. Managing opioid use disorder in primary care: PEER simplified guideline

Managing opioid use disorder in primary care: PEER simplified guideline Vol 65: MAY | MAI 2019 | Canadian Family Physician | Le Médecin de famille canadien 321 CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINES Editor’s key points ? This simplified guideline for managing opioid use disorder (OUD) was developed with a primary care focus using a systematic review of systematic reviews design. Recommendations are accompanied by practice pearls and additional resources to support primary care practitioners and shared (...) , informed decision making with patients. ? Managing patients with OUD in primary care and offering long-term opioid agonist therapy can improve patient outcomes. Adding psychosocial interventions and avoiding punitive measures might also be helpful. All discussions of treatment should involve the patient’s preferences and values. ? Future randomized controlled trials should clarify the effects of pharmacologic treatments on morbidity, mortality, and social functioning (eg, employment); the management

2019 CPG Infobase

8. Are opioids effective in the treatment of chronic low back pain?

Are opioids effective in the treatment of chronic low back pain? Are Opioids Effective in the Treatment of Chronic Low Back Pain? – Clinical Correlations Search Are Opioids Effective in the Treatment of Chronic Low Back Pain? April 17, 2019 4 min read By Anna Hirsch Peer Reviewed The use of opioid medications for chronic low back pain, or for any chronic non-cancer pain complaint, is still a source of controversy in the medical community, with a large divide between the recommendations (...) of professional societies and actual physician prescribing data. In the , 1 the 2 and the 3 have all issued guidelines urging caution with the use of opioids for chronic back pain, specifically emphasizing the poor-to-moderate quality of the evidence demonstrating benefit from this therapeutic modality. All three organizations reinforce that opioids should only be used after failure of other non-opioid and non-pharmacologic treatment options and recommend that if physicians choose to prescribe opioids

2019 Clinical Correlations

9. Inappropriate opioid prescription after surgery. (PubMed)

Inappropriate opioid prescription after surgery. Worldwide, the use of prescription opioid analgesics more than doubled between 2001 and 2013, with several countries, including the USA, Canada, and Australia, experiencing epidemics of opioid misuse and abuse over this period. In this context, excessive prescribing of opioids for pain treatment after surgery has been recognised as an important concern for public health and a potential contributor to patterns of opioid misuse and related harm (...) . In the second paper in this Series we review the evolution of prescription opioid use for pain treatment after surgery in the USA, Canada, and other countries. We summarise evidence on the extent of opioid overprescribing after surgery and its potential association with subsequent opioid misuse, diversion, and the development of opioid use disorder. We discuss evidence on patient, physician, and system-level predictors of excessive prescribing after surgery, and summarise recent work on clinical and policy

2019 Lancet

10. Perioperative opioid analgesia-when is enough too much? A review of opioid-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia. (PubMed)

Perioperative opioid analgesia-when is enough too much? A review of opioid-induced tolerance and hyperalgesia. Opioids are a mainstay of acute pain management but can have many adverse effects, contributing to problematic long-term use. Opioid tolerance (increased dose needed for analgesia) and opioid-induced hyperalgesia (paradoxical increase in pain with opioid administration) can contribute to both poorly controlled pain and dose escalation. Hyperalgesia is particularly problematic (...) as further opioid prescribing is largely futile. The mechanisms of opioid tolerance and hyperalgesia are complex, involving μ opioid receptor signalling pathways that offer opportunities for novel analgesic alternatives. The intracellular scaffold protein β-arrestin-2 is implicated in tolerance, hyperalgesia, and other opioid side-effects. Development of agonists biased against recruitment of β-arrestin-2 could provide analgesic efficacy with fewer side-effects. Alternative approaches include inhibition

2019 Lancet

11. Intensive Models of Hepatitis C Care for People Who Inject Drugs Receiving Opioid Agonist Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial. (PubMed)

Intensive Models of Hepatitis C Care for People Who Inject Drugs Receiving Opioid Agonist Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Many people who inject drugs (PWID) are denied treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, even if they are receiving opioid agonist therapy (OAT). Research suggests that HCV in PWID may be treated effectively, but optimal models of care for promoting adherence and sustained virologic response (SVR) have not been evaluated in the direct-acting antiviral (DAA

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

12. Naldemedine (Rizmoic) - treating constipation caused by opioid pain relief medicines

Naldemedine (Rizmoic) - treating constipation caused by opioid pain relief medicines 30 Churchill Place ? Canary Wharf ? London E14 5EU ? United Kingdom An agency of the European Union Telephone +44 (0)20 3660 6000 Facsimile +44 (0)20 3660 5555 Send a question via our website www.ema.europa.eu/contact © European Medicines Agency, 2019. Reproduction is authorised provided the source is acknowledged. EMA/21684/2019 EMEA/H/C/004256 Rizmoic An overview of Rizmoic and why it is authorised in the EU (...) What is Rizmoic and what is it used for? Rizmoic is a medicine for treating constipation caused by opioid pain relief medicines in patients who have previously been treated with a laxative (a medicine that triggers bowel movements). It contains the active substance naldemedine. How is Rizmoic used? Rizmoic is available as 200 microgram tablets. The recommended dose is one tablet once daily, which the patient can take with or without a laxative. The patient must stop taking Rizmoic when

2019 European Medicines Agency - EPARs

13. Strategies for Addressing the Opioid Crisis in the United States and Canada: Cross-Border Knowledge Sharing

Strategies for Addressing the Opioid Crisis in the United States and Canada: Cross-Border Knowledge Sharing www.ccsa.ca • www.ccdus.ca Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction • Centre canadien sur les dépendances et l’usage de substances Page 1 Strategies for Addressing the Opioid Crisis in the United States and Canada: Cross-Border Knowledge Sharing Introduction Both Canada and the United States (U.S.) have been experiencing increasing rates of opioid related harms in recent years (...) with overdose or poisoning deaths reaching staggering numbers. In 2017 alone, 3,998 Canadians were lost to opioid-related deaths, (Government of Canada, 2018a) and an overwhelming 47,600 lives were lost in the U.S (National Institute of Drug Abuse, 2019). These increases have prompted both countries to try to understand better how this crisis emerged — an exploration that has revealed complex and multifaceted precursors including social factors, physical conditions and gaps in the healthcare system, to name

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

14. American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the Medical Management of Opioid-Induced Constipation

American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the Medical Management of Opioid-Induced Constipation American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the Medical Management of Opioid-Induced Constipation - Gastroenterology Email/Username: Password: Remember me Search AGA Journals Search Terms Search within Search Access provided by Volume 156, Issue 1, Pages 218–226 American Gastroenterological Association Institute Guideline on the Medical Management of Opioid (...) of opioid-induced constipation. The guideline was developed by the AGA Institute’s Clinical Guidelines Committee and approved by the AGA Governing Board. It is accompanied by a technical review that is a compilation of clinical evidence from which these recommendations were formulated. x 1 Hanson, B., Siddique, S.M., Scarlett, Y. et al. American Gastroenterological Association Institute Technical Review on the Medical Management of Opioid-Induced Constipation. Gastroenterology . 2019 ; 156 : 229–253

2019 American Gastroenterological Association Institute

15. APOLLO-1: a randomized placebo and active-controlled phase III study investigating oliceridine (TRV130), a G protein-biased ligand at the micro-opioid receptor, for management of moderate-to-severe acute pain following bunionectomy (Full text)

APOLLO-1: a randomized placebo and active-controlled phase III study investigating oliceridine (TRV130), a G protein-biased ligand at the micro-opioid receptor, for management of moderate-to-severe acute pain following bunionectomy Oliceridine is a novel G protein-biased µ-opioid receptor agonist designed to provide intravenous (IV) analgesia with a lower risk of opioid-related adverse events (ORAEs) than conventional opioids.APOLLO-1 (NCT02815709) was a phase III, double-blind, randomized (...) postoperative pain compared to placebo. Additionally, it has a favorable safety and tolerability profile with regard to respiratory and gastrointestinal adverse effects compared to morphine, and may provide a new treatment option for patients with moderate-to-severe postoperative pain where an IV opioid is required.

2019 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

16. Initial Opioid Prescriptions among U.S. Commercially Insured Patients, 2012-2017. (PubMed)

Initial Opioid Prescriptions among U.S. Commercially Insured Patients, 2012-2017. The United States is undergoing a crippling opioid epidemic, spurred in part by overuse of prescription opioids by adults 25 to 64 years of age. Of concern are long-duration and high-dose initial prescriptions, which place the patients and their friends and relatives at heightened risk for long-term opioid use, misuse, overdose, and death.We estimated the incidence of initial opioid prescriptions in each month (...) between July 2012 and December 2017 using administrative-claims data from across the United States (accessed through Blue Cross-Blue Shield [BCBS] Axis); monthly incidence was estimated as the percentage of enrollees who received an initial opioid prescription among those who had not used opioids (i.e., no opioid prescription or a diagnosis of opioid use disorder in the 6 months before a given month). We then estimated the percentage of enrollees initiating opioid therapy who received a long-duration

2019 NEJM

17. Dual Receipt of Prescription Opioids From the Department of Veterans Affairs and Medicare Part D and Prescription Opioid Overdose Death Among Veterans: A Nested Case-Control Study. (PubMed)

Dual Receipt of Prescription Opioids From the Department of Veterans Affairs and Medicare Part D and Prescription Opioid Overdose Death Among Veterans: A Nested Case-Control Study. More than half of enrollees in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) are also covered by Medicare and can choose to receive their prescriptions from VA or from Medicare-participating providers. Such dual-system care may lead to unsafe opioid use if providers in these 2 systems do not coordinate care (...) or if prescription use is not tracked between systems.To evaluate the association between dual-system opioid prescribing and death from prescription opioid overdose.Nested case-control study.VA and Medicare Part D.Case and control patients were identified from all veterans enrolled in both VA and Part D who filled at least 1 opioid prescription from either system. The 215 case patients who died of a prescription opioid overdose in 2012 or 2013 were matched (up to 1:4) with 833 living control patients

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

18. Efficacy and safety of a monthly buprenorphine depot injection for opioid use disorder: a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial. (PubMed)

Efficacy and safety of a monthly buprenorphine depot injection for opioid use disorder: a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial. RBP-6000, referred to as BUP-XR (extended-release buprenorphine), is a subcutaneously injected, monthly buprenorphine treatment for opioid use disorder. BUP-XR provides sustained buprenorphine plasma concentrations to block drug-liking of abused opioids over the entire monthly dosing period, while controlling withdrawal and craving (...) symptoms. Administration of BUP-XR in a health-care setting also mitigates abuse, misuse, diversion, and unintentional exposure. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of different BUP-XR dosing regimens in participants with opioid use disorder.This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial was done at 36 treatment centres in the USA. Treatment-seeking adults aged 18-65 years who had moderate or severe opioid use disorder (as defined by the fifth edition of the Diagnostic

2019 Lancet

19. Opioid Prescription Patterns for Children Following Laparoscopic Appendectomy

Opioid Prescription Patterns for Children Following Laparoscopic Appendectomy To describe variability in and consequences of opioid prescriptions following pediatric laparoscopic appendectomy.Postoperative opioid prescribing patterns may contribute to persistent opioid use in both adults and children.We included children <18 years enrolled as dependents in the Military Health System Data Repository who underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy (2006-2014). For the primary outcome (...) of days of opioids prescribed, we evaluated associations with discharging service, standardized to the distribution of baseline covariates. Secondary outcomes included refill, Emergency Department (ED) visit for constipation, and ED visit for pain.Among 6732 children, 68% were prescribed opioids (range = 1-65 d, median = 4 d, IQR = 3-5 d). Patients discharged by general surgery services were prescribed 1.23 (95% CI = 1.06-1.42) excess days of opioids, compared with those discharged by pediatric

2019 EvidenceUpdates

20. Does Opioid Tapering in Chronic Pain Patients Result in Improved Pain or Same Pain vs Increased Pain at Taper Completion? A Structured Evidence-Based Systematic Review

Does Opioid Tapering in Chronic Pain Patients Result in Improved Pain or Same Pain vs Increased Pain at Taper Completion? A Structured Evidence-Based Systematic Review To support or refute the hypothesis that opioid tapering in chronic pain patients (CPPs) improves pain or maintains the same pain level by taper completion but does not increase pain.Of 364 references, 20 fulfilled inclusion/exclusion criteria. These studies were type 3 and 4 (not controlled) but reported pre/post-taper pain (...) completion. One study reported that by taper completion, 97% of the CPPs had improved or the same pain, but CPPs had worse pain in 3%. As such, 100% of the studies supported the hypothesis. Applying the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research Levels of Evidence Guidelines to this result produced an A consistency rating.There is consistent type 3 and 4 study evidence that opioid tapering in CPPs reduces pain or maintains the same level of pain. However, these studies represented lower levels

2019 EvidenceUpdates