Latest & greatest articles for omeprazole

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Top results for omeprazole

1. Omeprazole

Omeprazole Top results for omeprazole - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Find evidence fast ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 or #4 (...) ) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for omeprazole The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

2. Efficacy of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate treatment in gastroesophageal reflux disease: a systematic review.

Efficacy of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate treatment in gastroesophageal reflux disease: a systematic review. Proton pump inhibitors are the most effective medical therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease, but their onset of action may be slow.To assess the available literature regarding the efficacy of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate in gastroesophageal reflux patients.A systematic review was conducted. A systematic literature search starting from 2000. Reviewed manuscripts concerning (...) the effectiveness of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate treatment in gastroesophageal reflux disease were reviewed and the data were extracted. Data were subsequently analyzed with descriptive statistics.This review included information of four studies. Two trials compared the efficacy of omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate versus omeprazole. One study compared the efficacy of once-daily morning or nighttime dosing. And another study compared omeprazole/sodium bicarbonate/alginate versus omeprazole. In total

2018 Medwave

3. Effect of clopidogrel on the hydroxylation and sulfoxidation of omeprazole: A single dose study in healthy human volunteers (Full text)

Effect of clopidogrel on the hydroxylation and sulfoxidation of omeprazole: A single dose study in healthy human volunteers Based upon the known potential interaction between omeprazole (OMP) and clopidogrel (CLOP), the current study was designed to evaluate the effect of CLOP on disposition of OMP and its two major metabolites, 5-hydroxyomeprazole (5-OH-OMP) and omeprazole sulfone (OMP-S) in healthy clinical subjects. A randomized, open label, 2-period, crossover study was designed. Twelve

2017 EXCLI journal PubMed

4. A randomized controlled study comparing omeprazole and cimetidine for the prophylaxis of stress-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (Full text)

A randomized controlled study comparing omeprazole and cimetidine for the prophylaxis of stress-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage Patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) are at high risk for severe stress-related upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding, which is predictive of higher mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of omeprazole and cimetidine compared with a placebo in the prevention and management of stress (...) -related UGI bleeding in patients with ICH.In a single-center, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 184 surgically treated patients with CT-proven ICH within 72 hours of ictus and negative results for gastric occult blood testing were included. Of these patients, 165 who were qualified upon further evaluation were randomized into 3 groups: 58 patients received 40 mg intravenous omeprazole every 12 hours, 54 patients received 300 mg intravenous cimetidine every 6 hours, and 53 patients received

2013 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

5. Randomized controlled trial of standard versus high-dose intravenous omeprazole after endoscopic therapy in high-risk patients with acute peptic ulcer bleeding. (PubMed)

Randomized controlled trial of standard versus high-dose intravenous omeprazole after endoscopic therapy in high-risk patients with acute peptic ulcer bleeding. Rebleeding from peptic ulcers is a major contributor to death. This study compared standard (40-mg intravenous infusion of omeprazole once daily for 3 days) and high-dose (80-mg bolus of omeprazole followed by 8-mg/h infusion for 72 h) in reducing the rebleeding rate (primary endpoint), need for surgery, duration of hospital stay (...) cent) of 61 patients in the high-dose group and ten (16 per cent) of 61 in the standard-dose group exhibited rebleeding, a difference of - 13 (95 per cent confidence interval - 25 to - 2) per cent. The upper limit of the one-sided confidence interval exceeded a predefined equivalence absolute difference of 16 per cent. Equivalence of standard- and high-dose omeprazole in preventing rebleeding was not demonstrated.Intravenous standard-dose omeprazole was inferior to high-dose omeprazole

2011 EvidenceUpdates

6. Helicobacter pylori eradication with a capsule containing bismuth subcitrate potassium, metronidazole, and tetracycline given with omeprazole versus clarithromycin-based triple therapy: a randomised, open-label, non-inferiority, phase 3 trial. (PubMed)

Helicobacter pylori eradication with a capsule containing bismuth subcitrate potassium, metronidazole, and tetracycline given with omeprazole versus clarithromycin-based triple therapy: a randomised, open-label, non-inferiority, phase 3 trial. Helicobacter pylori is associated with benign and malignant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and increasing antibiotic resistance has made alternative treatments necessary. Our aim was to assess the efficacy and safety of a new, single (...) -capsule treatment versus the gold standard for H pylori eradication.We did a randomised, open-label, non-inferiority, phase 3 trial in 39 sites in Europe, comparing the efficacy and safety of 10 days of quadruple therapy with omeprazole plus a single three-in-one capsule containing bismuth subcitrate potassium, metronidazole, and tetracycline (quadruple therapy) versus 7 days of omeprazole, amoxicillin, and clarithromycin (standard therapy) in adults with recorded H pylori infection. Patients were

2011 Lancet

7. Randomised controlled trial: Addition of omeprazole to dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel plus aspirin lowers the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding

Randomised controlled trial: Addition of omeprazole to dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel plus aspirin lowers the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding Addition of omeprazole to dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel plus aspirin lowers the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about (...) how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Addition of omeprazole to dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel plus aspirin lowers

2011 Evidence-Based Medicine (Requires free registration)

8. Interaction of clopidogrel and omeprazole. (PubMed)

Interaction of clopidogrel and omeprazole. 21067412 2010 11 30 2018 12 01 1533-4406 363 20 2010 Nov 11 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Interaction of clopidogrel and omeprazole. 1977 10.1056/NEJMc1012022 Southworth Mary Ross MR Temple Robert R eng Letter Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 0 Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors 0 Proton Pump Inhibitors A74586SNO7 Clopidogrel KG60484QX9 Omeprazole OM90ZUW7M1 Ticlopidine AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2010 Nov 11;363(20 (...) ):1909-17 20925534 Cardiovascular Diseases epidemiology prevention & control Clopidogrel Coronary Artery Disease drug therapy Drug Interactions Drug Therapy, Combination Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage prevention & control Humans Omeprazole pharmacology therapeutic use Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors therapeutic use Proton Pump Inhibitors pharmacology therapeutic use Ticlopidine analogs & derivatives therapeutic use 2010 11 12 6 0 2010 11 12 6 0 2010 12 14 6 0 ppublish 21067412 10.1056/NEJMc1012022

2010 NEJM

9. Celecoxib versus omeprazole and diclofenac in patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis (CONDOR): a randomised trial. (PubMed)

Celecoxib versus omeprazole and diclofenac in patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis (CONDOR): a randomised trial. Cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and non-selective NSAIDs plus a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) have similar upper gastrointestinal outcomes, but risk of clinical outcomes across the entire gastrointestinal tract might be lower with selective drugs than with non-selective drugs. We aimed to compare risk of gastrointestinal (...) to receive celecoxib 200 mg twice a day or diclofenac slow release 75 mg twice a day plus omeprazole 20 mg once a day. Patients and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was a composite of clinically significant upper or lower gastrointestinal events adjudicated by an independent committee. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00141102.4484 patients were randomly allocated to treatment (2238 celecoxib; 2246

2010 Lancet

10. Clopidogrel with or without omeprazole in coronary artery disease. (PubMed)

Clopidogrel with or without omeprazole in coronary artery disease. Gastrointestinal complications are an important problem of antithrombotic therapy. Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are believed to decrease the risk of such complications, though no randomized trial has proved this in patients receiving dual antiplatelet therapy. Recently, concerns have been raised about the potential for PPIs to blunt the efficacy of clopidogrel.We randomly assigned patients with an indication for dual (...) antiplatelet therapy to receive clopidogrel in combination with either omeprazole or placebo, in addition to aspirin. The primary gastrointestinal end point was a composite of overt or occult bleeding, symptomatic gastroduodenal ulcers or erosions, obstruction, or perforation. The primary cardiovascular end point was a composite of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, revascularization, or stroke. The trial was terminated prematurely when the sponsor lost financing.We planned

2010 NEJM

11. Use of intravenous omeprazole in gastrointestinal patients before endoscopy

Use of intravenous omeprazole in gastrointestinal patients before endoscopy BestBets: Use of intravenous omeprazole in gastrointestinal patients before endoscopy Use of intravenous omeprazole in gastrointestinal patients before endoscopy Report By: CK TAI - Resident Search checked by Colin A Graham - Professor Institution: Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong Date Submitted: 26th May 2008 Last Modified: 29th October 2008 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question Does [intravenous omeprazole (...) ] lead to [a decrease in the rebleeding rate] for [patients with suspected gastrointestinal bleeding in the emergency department]? Clinical Scenario A 55 year-old woman presents to the emergency department with fresh malaena. She is haemodynamically unstable. You wonder whether early use of intravenous omeprazole (prior to endoscopy) could reduce her rebleeding rate after emergency upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Search Strategy Medline searched from 1997 to May week 1 2008 using the OVID interface

2008 BestBETS

12. Cost-effectiveness analysis of high-dose omeprazole infusion before endoscopy for patients with upper-GI bleeding

Cost-effectiveness analysis of high-dose omeprazole infusion before endoscopy for patients with upper-GI bleeding Cost-effectiveness analysis of high-dose omeprazole infusion before endoscopy for patients with upper-GI bleeding Cost-effectiveness analysis of high-dose omeprazole infusion before endoscopy for patients with upper-GI bleeding Tsoi KK, Lau JY, Sung JJ Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract (...) of the effectiveness data, overall, the methodology was valid. The conclusions reached by the authors appear to be appropriate and reflect the limited scope of their analysis. Type of economic evaluation Cost-effectiveness analysis Study objective The objective was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of using a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) before an endoscopy for the management of upper-gastrointestinal bleeding. Interventions The intervention was omeprazole (a PPI) at a dose of 80mg as an intravenous injection

2008 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

13. Omeprazole before endoscopy in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. (Full text)

Omeprazole before endoscopy in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. A neutral gastric pH is critical for the stability of clots over bleeding arteries. We investigated the effect of preemptive infusion of omeprazole before endoscopy on the need for endoscopic therapy.Consecutive patients admitted with upper gastrointestinal bleeding underwent stabilization and were then randomly assigned to receive either omeprazole or placebo (each as an 80-mg intravenous bolus followed by an 8-mg infusion (...) per hour) before endoscopy the next morning.Over a 17-month period, 638 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to omeprazole or placebo (319 in each group). The need for endoscopic treatment was lower in the omeprazole group than in the placebo group (60 of the 314 patients included in the analysis [19.1%] vs. 90 of 317 patients [28.4%], P=0.007). There were no significant differences between the omeprazole group and the placebo group in the mean amount of blood transfused (1.54 and 1.88

2007 NEJM PubMed

14. Empirical prescribing for dyspepsia: randomised controlled trial of test and treat versus omeprazole treatment. (Full text)

Empirical prescribing for dyspepsia: randomised controlled trial of test and treat versus omeprazole treatment. To compare the efficacy of a "Helicobacter pylori test and treat" strategy with that of an empirical trial of omeprazole in the non-endoscopic management by empirical prescribing of young patients with dyspepsia.Randomised controlled trial.Hospital gastroenterology unit.219 patients under 45 years old presenting with dyspepsia without alarm symptoms.Patients received treatment (...) with omeprazole 20 mg (group A) or with a urea breath test followed by an eradication treatment in case of H pylori infection or omeprazole alone in non-infected patients (group B). Lack of improvement or recurrence of symptoms prompted endoscopy.Improvement in symptoms assessed by a dyspepsia severity score every two months; use of medical resources (endoscopic workload and medical consultation); clinical outcome.96/109 (88%) patients in group A and 61/110 (55%) in group B (P < 0.0001) had endoscopy: in 19

2003 BMJ PubMed

15. Celecoxib versus diclofenac and omeprazole in reducing the risk of recurrent ulcer bleeding in patients with arthritis. (PubMed)

Celecoxib versus diclofenac and omeprazole in reducing the risk of recurrent ulcer bleeding in patients with arthritis. Current guidelines recommend that patients at risk for ulcer disease who require treatment for arthritis receive nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that are selective for cyclooxygenase-2 or the combination of a nonselective NSAID with a proton-pump inhibitor. We assessed whether celecoxib would be similar to diclofenac plus omeprazole in reducing the risk (...) of recurrent ulcer bleeding in patients at high risk for bleeding.We studied patients who used NSAIDs for arthritis and who presented with ulcer bleeding. After their ulcers had healed, we randomly assigned patients who were negative for Helicobacter pylori to receive either 200 mg of celecoxib twice daily plus daily placebo or 75 mg of diclofenac twice daily plus 20 mg of omeprazole daily for six months. The end point was recurrent ulcer bleeding.In the intention-to-treat analysis, which included 287

2002 NEJM

16. Cost effectiveness of esomeprazole compared with omeprazole in the acute treatment of patients with reflux oesophagitis in the UK

Cost effectiveness of esomeprazole compared with omeprazole in the acute treatment of patients with reflux oesophagitis in the UK Cost effectiveness of esomeprazole compared with omeprazole in the acute treatment of patients with reflux oesophagitis in the UK Cost effectiveness of esomeprazole compared with omeprazole in the acute treatment of patients with reflux oesophagitis in the UK Wahlqvist P, Junghard O, Higgins A, Green J Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic (...) evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The health interventions examined in the study were esomeprazole (40 mg once daily) and omeprazole (20 mg once daily) for the acute treatment of reflux oesophagitis. Type of intervention Treatment. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis

2002 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

17. Cost effectiveness of proton pump inhibitors in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease without oesophagitis: comparison of on-demand esomeprazole with conventional omeprazole strategies

Cost effectiveness of proton pump inhibitors in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease without oesophagitis: comparison of on-demand esomeprazole with conventional omeprazole strategies Cost effectiveness of proton pump inhibitors in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease without oesophagitis: comparison of on-demand esomeprazole with conventional omeprazole strategies Cost effectiveness of proton pump inhibitors in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease without oesophagitis: comparison of on-demand (...) esomeprazole with conventional omeprazole strategies Wahlqvist P, Junghard O, Higgins A, Green J Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Three strategies for the treatment of patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD

2002 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of proton pump inhibitors compared to omeprazole in the healing of reflux oesophagitis

Cost-effectiveness analysis of proton pump inhibitors compared to omeprazole in the healing of reflux oesophagitis Cost-effectiveness analysis of proton pump inhibitors compared to omeprazole in the healing of reflux oesophagitis Cost-effectiveness analysis of proton pump inhibitors compared to omeprazole in the healing of reflux oesophagitis Plumb J M, Edwards S J Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract (...) review were the relative risk (RR) for healing with esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole and rabeprazole relative to omeprazole at 4 and 8 weeks. These RR values were then converted into probability values ("calculated" healing rates) used in the decision model. The additional healing rates at 8 weeks, if not healed at 4 weeks, were also derived from the systematic review. Study designs and other criteria for inclusion in the review Not reported. Sources searched to identify primary studies

2002 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

19. Healing and relapse rates in gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with the newer proton-pump inhibitors lansoprazole, rabeprazole, and pantoprazole compared with omeprazole, ranitidine and placebo: evidence from randomized clinical trials

Healing and relapse rates in gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with the newer proton-pump inhibitors lansoprazole, rabeprazole, and pantoprazole compared with omeprazole, ranitidine and placebo: evidence from randomized clinical trials Healing and relapse rates in gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with the newer proton-pump inhibitors lansoprazole, rabeprazole, and pantoprazole compared with omeprazole, ranitidine and placebo: evidence from randomized clinical trials Healing (...) and relapse rates in gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with the newer proton-pump inhibitors lansoprazole, rabeprazole, and pantoprazole compared with omeprazole, ranitidine and placebo: evidence from randomized clinical trials Caro J J, Salas M, Ward A Authors' objectives To estimate the healing and relapse rates in the acute and maintenance treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with the newer proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) lansoprazole, rabeprazole and pantoprazole, compared

2001 DARE.

20. Effect of intravenous omeprazole on recurrent bleeding after endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers. (Full text)

Effect of intravenous omeprazole on recurrent bleeding after endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers. After endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers, bleeding recurs in 15 to 20 percent of patients.We assessed whether the use of a high dose of a proton-pump inhibitor would reduce the frequency of recurrent bleeding after endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers. Patients with actively bleeding ulcers or ulcers with nonbleeding visible vessels were treated with an epinephrine (...) injection followed by thermocoagulation. After hemostasis had been achieved, they were randomly assigned in a double-blind fashion to receive omeprazole (given as a bolus intravenous injection of 80 mg followed by an infusion of 8 mg per hour for 72 hours) or placebo. After the infusion, all patients were given 20 mg of omeprazole orally per day for eight weeks. The primary end point was recurrent bleeding within 30 days after endoscopy.We enrolled 240 patients, 120 in each group. Bleeding recurred

2000 NEJM PubMed