Latest & greatest articles for falls

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Top results for falls

1. Effect of Vitamin K2 on Postural Sway in Older People Who Fall: A Randomized Controlled Trial (Full text)

Effect of Vitamin K2 on Postural Sway in Older People Who Fall: A Randomized Controlled Trial Vitamin K is thought to be involved in both bone health and maintenance of neuromuscular function. We tested the effect of vitamin K2 supplementation on postural sway, falls, healthcare costs, and indices of physical function in older people at risk of falls.Parallel-group double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial.Fourteen primary care practices in Scotland, UK.A total of 95 community-dwelling (...) participants aged 65 and older with at least two falls, or one injurious fall, in the previous year.Once/day placebo, 200 μg or 400 μg of oral vitamin K2 for 1 year.The primary outcome was anteroposterior sway measured using sway plates at 12 months, adjusted for baseline. Secondary outcomes included the Short Physical Performance Battery, Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up & Go Test, quality of life, health and social care costs, falls, and adverse events.Mean participant age was 75 (standard deviation [SD] = 7

2019 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

2. Effectiveness of Tai Ji Quan vs Multimodal and Stretching Exercise Interventions for Reducing Injurious Falls in Older Adults at High Risk of Falling: Follow-up Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial (Full text)

Effectiveness of Tai Ji Quan vs Multimodal and Stretching Exercise Interventions for Reducing Injurious Falls in Older Adults at High Risk of Falling: Follow-up Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial Exercise has been shown to reduce injurious falls in older adults. Evidence, however, is lacking regarding the types of intervention that are most effective in preventing injurious falls among older adults at high risk of falling.To determine the longer-term effectiveness of therapeutic tai ji (...) quan intervention vs multimodal exercise and stretching exercise in decreasing injurious falls among older adults at high risk of falling.This trial involves a prespecified analysis with the data analyzed by intent-to-treat. Follow-up analysis of a single-blind randomized trial conducted in community settings of 7 urban and suburban cities in Oregon from February 20, 2015, to September 15, 2018, compared a therapeutic tai ji quan intervention with multimodal exercise and stretching exercise

2019 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

3. Visually Impaired OLder people's Exercise programme for falls prevenTion (VIOLET): a feasibility study

Visually Impaired OLder people's Exercise programme for falls prevenTion (VIOLET): a feasibility study Visually Impaired OLder people's Exercise programme for falls prevenTion (VIOLET): a feasibility study Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need (...) . >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} This feasibility study adapted an exercise programme for preventing falls specifically for visually impaired older people, and while the pilot RCT showed no impact on fear of falling, the study made recommendations for a future trial. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , , , & . Nicola Adams 1, * , Dawn Skelton 2 , Cathy Bailey 1 , Denise Howel 3 , Dorothy Coe 1 , Rosy Lampitt 4 , Jennifer Wilkinson 4

2019 NIHR HTA programme

4. Podiatry interventions to prevent falls in older people: a systematic review and meta-analysis (Full text)

Podiatry interventions to prevent falls in older people: a systematic review and meta-analysis foot problems are independent risk factors for falls in older people. Podiatrists diagnose and treat a wide range of problems affecting the feet, ankles and lower limbs. However, the effectiveness of podiatry interventions to prevent falls in older people is unknown. This systematic review examined podiatry interventions for falls prevention delivered in the community and in care homes.systematic (...) of detection bias in 4/9 studies. Combining falls rate data showed significant effects for multifaceted podiatry interventions compared to usual care (falls rate ratio 0.77 [95% CI 0.61, 0.99]); and multifactorial interventions including podiatry (falls rate ratio: 0.73 [95% CI 0.54, 0.98]). Single component podiatry interventions demonstrated no significant effects on falls rate.multifaceted podiatry interventions and multifactorial interventions involving referral to podiatry produce significant

2019 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

5. Risk factors for in hospital falls

Risk factors for in hospital falls Rapid Literature Review – Risk Factors for Falls in hospital. 1 Risk factors for in hospital falls Citation Fiona Clay, Gillian Yap and Angela Melder. 2018. Risk factors for in hospital falls: Evidence Review. Centre for Clinical Effectiveness, Monash Health, Melbourne, Australia Contact CCE@monashhealth.org Executive Summary Background The Falls Committee has requested CCE provide a review of the evidence on risk factors for falls sustained in hospital (...) . The high prevalence of falls and injury rate co-occur with substantial healthcare costs. [1] Moreover, older adults often experience a decline in functional status and social activities after a fall and report a reduced quality of life. [2] The purpose of this is review is to better understand drivers for the increasing falls rate at Monash Health. Objective To identify the risk factors associated with an increased risk of falls in the hospital setting. Search Strategy Scientific and grey literature

2019 Monash Health Evidence Reviews

6. Association of Long-term Exercise Training With Risk of Falls, Fractures, Hospitalizations, and Mortality in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Association of Long-term Exercise Training With Risk of Falls, Fractures, Hospitalizations, and Mortality in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis Long-term exercise benefits on prevalent adverse events in older populations, such as falls, fractures, or hospitalizations, are not yet established or known.To systematically review and investigate the association of long-term exercise interventions (≥1 year) with the risk of falls, injurious falls, multiple falls, fractures (...) method).Six binary outcomes for the risk of falls, injurious falls, multiple falls (≥2 falls), fractures, hospitalization, and mortality.Forty-six studies (22 709 participants) were included in the review and 40 (21 868 participants) in the meta-analyses (mean [SD] age, 73.1 [7.1] years; 15 054 [66.3%] of participants were women). The most used exercise was a multicomponent training (eg, aerobic plus strength plus balance); mean frequency was 3 times per week, about 50 minutes per session

2019 EvidenceUpdates

7. Effects of a falls prevention exercise programme on health-related quality of life in older home care recipients: a randomised controlled trial

Effects of a falls prevention exercise programme on health-related quality of life in older home care recipients: a randomised controlled trial falls have serious consequences for quality of life (QOL) and contribute substantially to the global burden of disease. Home care is an important arena to address falls prevention and QOL, but this vulnerable group of older adults is underrepresented in health research. This study explores the effects of a falls prevention exercise programme on health (...) -related quality of life (HRQOL), physical function and falls self-efficacy in older fallers receiving home care.the study design is a parallel-group randomised controlled trial. The intervention group performed a falls prevention programme based on the Otago Exercise Programme (OEP). The control group received usual care. 155 participants were recruited from primary health care in six Norwegian municipalities. Local physiotherapists supervised the programme. The primary outcome, HRQOL, was measured

2019 EvidenceUpdates

8. Decreasing Fear of Falling in Chronic Stroke Survivors Through Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Task-Oriented Training

Decreasing Fear of Falling in Chronic Stroke Survivors Through Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Task-Oriented Training Background and Purpose- Research has shown that balance training is effective for reducing the fear of falling in individuals with a history of stroke. In this study, we evaluated (1) whether cognitive behavior therapy could augment the beneficial effects of task-oriented balance training (TOBT) in reducing the fear of falling in chronic stroke survivors and (2) whether it could (...) , in turn, reduce fear-avoidance behavior and improve related health outcomes. Methods- Eighty-nine cognitively intact subjects with mildly impaired balance ability were randomized into the following 2 groups that underwent 90-minutes interventions 2 days per week for 8 weeks: (1) cognitive behavior therapy + TOBT or (2) general health education + TOBT (control). The primary outcome was the fear of falling, and the secondary outcomes were fear-avoidance behavior, balance, fall risk, independent daily

2019 EvidenceUpdates

9. Dual-Task Exercise Reduces Cognitive-Motor Interference in Walking and Falls After Stroke

Dual-Task Exercise Reduces Cognitive-Motor Interference in Walking and Falls After Stroke Background and Purpose- Functional community ambulation requires the ability to perform mobility and cognitive task simultaneously (dual-tasking). This single-blinded randomized controlled study aimed to examine the effects of dual-task exercise in chronic stroke patients. Methods- Eighty-four chronic stroke patients (24 women; age, 61.2±6.4 years; time since stroke onset, 75.3±64.9 months) with mild (...) during serial-3-subtractions and verbal fluency task. Secondary outcomes included the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Frenchay Activities Index, and Stroke-specific Quality of Life Scale. The above outcomes were measured at baseline, immediately after, and 8 weeks after training. Fall incidence was recorded for a 6-month period posttraining. Results- Only the dual-task group exhibited reduced dual-task interference in walking time posttraining (forward walking combined with verbal

2019 EvidenceUpdates

10. A combined physical activity and fall prevention intervention improved mobility-related goal attainment but not physical activity in older adults: a randomised trial (Full text)

A combined physical activity and fall prevention intervention improved mobility-related goal attainment but not physical activity in older adults: a randomised trial In people aged ≥ 60 years, does a combined physical activity and fall prevention intervention affect physical activity and mobility-related goal attainment? Does the combined intervention also improve fall rates, daily steps, the proportion of people meeting the physical activity guidelines, quality of life, mood, fear of falling (...) , and mobility limitation?Randomised trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and assessor blinding.One hundred and thirty-one people living in the community and aged ≥ 60 years.The experimental group received one physiotherapist visit, fortnightly telephone-based health coaching, a pedometer, tailored fall prevention advice, and a fall prevention brochure. The control group received the same fall prevention brochure.Primary outcomes were mobility goal attainment (Goal Attainment Scale

2019 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

11. Exercise for preventing falls in older people living in the community. (PubMed)

Exercise for preventing falls in older people living in the community. At least one-third of community-dwelling people over 65 years of age fall each year. Exercises that target balance, gait and muscle strength have been found to prevent falls in these people. An up-to-date synthesis of the evidence is important given the major long-term consequences associated with falls and fall-related injuries OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of exercise interventions for preventing (...) falls in older people living in the community.We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, three other databases and two trial registers up to 2 May 2018, together with reference checking and contact with study authors to identify additional studies.We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effects of any form of exercise as a single intervention on falls in people aged 60+ years living in the community. We excluded trials focused on particular conditions, such as stroke.We used

2019 Cochrane

12. Assessment of falls in the elderly

Assessment of falls in the elderly Assessment of falls in the elderly - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of falls in the elderly Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: January 2019 Summary Falls are often multifactorial in origin. Deandrea S. Risk factors for falls in community-dwelling older people: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Epidemiology. 2010 Sep;21(5):658-68. http (...) ://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20585256?tool=bestpractice.com The presence of the following factors is associated with greater probability of future falls, Rubenstein LZ, Josephson KR. Falls and their prevention in elderly people: what does the evidence show? Med Clin North Am. 2006 Sep;90(5):807-24. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16962843?tool=bestpractice.com McInnes L, Gibbons E, Chandler-Oatts J. Clinical practice guideline for the assessment and prevention of falls in older people. Worldviews Evid Based Nurs

2019 BMJ Best Practice

13. Effect on falls among elderly persons after training elderly care staff

Effect on falls among elderly persons after training elderly care staff Effect on falls among elderly persons after training elderly care staff We use cookies on this website. By using this site, you agree that we may store and access cookies on your device. Swedish Agency for Health Technology Assessment and Assessment of Social Services Effect on falls among elderly persons after training elderly care staff Share: Reading time approx. 4 minutes In general, every person aged 65 years or older (...) , experience at least one fall per year. Falls are common reasons for injuries, and even death. Fall prevention among elderly persons is important due to reasons such as reduced functioning, individual suffering and societal costs. Staff training is one, frequently used, intervention. Question Does staff training in fall prevention, medication or nutrition effect falls among elderly persons? Tables with identified studies Table 1. Systematic reviews Included studies Population Outcome Balzer et al 2012 [1

2019 Swedish Council on Technology Assessement

14. A systematic review of the effect of yoga on falls, fractures and health-related outcomes in people with low bone mass

A systematic review of the effect of yoga on falls, fractures and health-related outcomes in people with low bone mass Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any

2019 PROSPERO

15. The impact of vitamin D supplementation on fractures, falls and mortality: an umbrella review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials

The impact of vitamin D supplementation on fractures, falls and mortality: an umbrella review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability

2019 PROSPERO

16. Systematic review of the accuracy of clinical tests to assess fall risk and balance in individuals with lower limb loss

Systematic review of the accuracy of clinical tests to assess fall risk and balance in individuals with lower limb loss Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any

2019 PROSPERO

17. Tai Chi for improving balance and reducing falls: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Tai Chi for improving balance and reducing falls: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any

2019 PROSPERO

18. Does vitamin D supplementation reduce falls outcomes among community dwelling older adults at risk of socioeconomic vulnerability and at risk of or with established vitamin D deficiency: a systematic review

Does vitamin D supplementation reduce falls outcomes among community dwelling older adults at risk of socioeconomic vulnerability and at risk of or with established vitamin D deficiency: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears

2019 PROSPERO

19. The impact of physical function on recurrent falls in individuals with spinal cord injury: a systematic review

The impact of physical function on recurrent falls in individuals with spinal cord injury: a systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability for the content of this registration record, any associated files

2019 PROSPERO

20. Is combined physical and cognitive training more effective than either alone for improving gait, falls, and self-reported disability in older adults? A systematic review

Is combined physical and cognitive training more effective than either alone for improving gait, falls, and self-reported disability in older adults? A systematic review Print | PDF PROSPERO This information has been provided by the named contact for this review. CRD has accepted this information in good faith and registered the review in PROSPERO. The registrant confirms that the information supplied for this submission is accurate and complete. CRD bears no responsibility or liability

2019 PROSPERO