Latest & greatest articles for cannabis

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Top results for cannabis

101. Review: pharmacological and psychological interventions decrease cannabis use in people with depressive and psychotic disorders in the short term

Review: pharmacological and psychological interventions decrease cannabis use in people with depressive and psychotic disorders in the short term Review: pharmacological and psychological interventions decrease cannabis use in people with depressive and psychotic disorders in the short term | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about (...) how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: pharmacological and psychological interventions decrease cannabis use in people

2010 Evidence-Based Mental Health

102. Adverse health effects of non-medical cannabis use. (PubMed)

Adverse health effects of non-medical cannabis use. For over two decades, cannabis, commonly known as marijuana, has been the most widely used illicit drug by young people in high-income countries, and has recently become popular on a global scale. Epidemiological research during the past 10 years suggests that regular use of cannabis during adolescence and into adulthood can have adverse effects. Epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory studies have established an association between cannabis (...) use and adverse outcomes. We focus on adverse health effects of greatest potential public health interest-that is, those that are most likely to occur and to affect a large number of cannabis users. The most probable adverse effects include a dependence syndrome, increased risk of motor vehicle crashes, impaired respiratory function, cardiovascular disease, and adverse effects of regular use on adolescent psychosocial development and mental health.

2009 Lancet

103. Familial predisposition for psychiatric disorder: comparison of subjects treated for cannabis-induced psychosis and schizophrenia (Full text)

Familial predisposition for psychiatric disorder: comparison of subjects treated for cannabis-induced psychosis and schizophrenia Cannabis-induced psychosis is considered a distinct clinical entity in the existing psychiatric diagnostic systems. However, the validity of the diagnosis is uncertain.To establish rate ratios of developing cannabis-induced psychosis associated with predisposition to psychosis and other psychiatric disorders in a first-degree relative and to compare them (...) with the corresponding rate ratios for developing schizophrenia spectrum disorders.A population-based cohort was retrieved from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register and linked with the Danish Civil Registration System. History of treatment of psychiatric disorder in family members was used as an indicator of predisposition to psychiatric disorder. Rate ratios of cannabis-induced psychosis and schizophrenia associated with predisposition to psychiatric disorders were compared using competing risk

2008 EvidenceUpdates PubMed

104. Cannabis and schizophrenia. (Full text)

Cannabis and schizophrenia. Many people with schizophrenia use cannabis and its effects on the illness are unclear.To evaluate the effects of cannabis use on people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like illnesses.We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO.We included all randomised trials involving cannabinoids and people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like (...) illnesses.We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis, based on a fixed effects model. We calculated the numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH). For continuous data, we calculated weighted mean differences (WMD) again based on a fixed effects model.We identified one randomised trial. No significant differences were found between the Cannabis and Psychosis Therapy (CAP) intervention group

2008 Cochrane PubMed

105. Cannabis use increases risk of developing symptoms of mania

Cannabis use increases risk of developing symptoms of mania Cannabis use increases risk of developing symptoms of mania | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name (...) or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Cannabis use increases risk of developing symptoms of mania Article Text Aetiology Cannabis use increases risk of developing symptoms of mania Statistics from Altmetric.com Request Permissions If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which

2008 Evidence-Based Mental Health

106. Cannabis smoking and periodontal disease among young adults. (Full text)

Cannabis smoking and periodontal disease among young adults. Tobacco smoking is a recognized behavioral risk factor for periodontal disease (through its systemic effects), and cannabis smoking may contribute in a similar way.To determine whether cannabis smoking is a risk factor for periodontal disease.Prospective cohort study of the general population, with cannabis use determined at ages 18, 21, 26, and 32 years and dental examinations conducted at ages 26 and 32 years. The most recent data (...) sites per tooth.Three cannabis exposure groups were determined: no exposure (293 individuals, or 32.3%), some exposure (428; 47.4%), and high exposure (182; 20.2%). At age 32 years, 265 participants (29.3%) had 1 or more sites with 4 mm or greater CAL, and 111 participants (12.3%) had 1 or more sites with 5 mm or greater CAL. Incident attachment loss between the ages of 26 and 32 years in the none, some, and high cannabis exposure groups was 6.5%, 11.2%, and 23.6%, respectively. After controlling

2008 JAMA PubMed

107. Review: Cannabis use increases the risk of psychotic outcomes

Review: Cannabis use increases the risk of psychotic outcomes Review: Cannabis use increases the risk of psychotic outcomes | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user (...) name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: Cannabis use increases the risk of psychotic outcomes Article Text Aetiology Review: Cannabis use increases the risk of psychotic outcomes Statistics from Altmetric.com Request Permissions If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link

2008 Evidence-Based Mental Health

108. Short scales to assess cannabis-related problems: a review of psychometric properties (Full text)

Short scales to assess cannabis-related problems: a review of psychometric properties Short scales to assess cannabis-related problems: a review of psychometric properties Short scales to assess cannabis-related problems: a review of psychometric properties Piontek D, Kraus L, Klempova D CRD summary This review concluded that all four screening tools to assess cannabis-related problems showed satisfactory measures of reliability and validity. Limitations in the review, in particular (...) the possibility of publication bias and unclear validity of the included studies, means that these conclusions should be interpreted with caution. Authors' objectives To summarise the psychometric properties of four short screening scales to assess problematic forms of cannabis use. Searching PubMed, PsycINFO and Addiction Abstracts were searched (dates not reported) for peer reviewed published studies. Search terms were reported. The Internet was searched and reference lists of retrieved studies were

2008 DARE. PubMed

109. Review: use of cannabis is associated with increased risk of psychotic outcomes later in life

Review: use of cannabis is associated with increased risk of psychotic outcomes later in life Review: use of cannabis is associated with increased risk of psychotic outcomes later in lifeCommentary | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts (...) OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: use of cannabis is associated with increased risk of psychotic outcomes later in lifeCommentary Article Text Causation Review: use of cannabis is associated with increased risk of psychotic

2008 Evidence-Based Nursing

110. Cannabis use and risk of psychotic or affective mental health outcomes: a systematic review. (Full text)

Cannabis use and risk of psychotic or affective mental health outcomes: a systematic review. Whether cannabis can cause psychotic or affective symptoms that persist beyond transient intoxication is unclear. We systematically reviewed the evidence pertaining to cannabis use and occurrence of psychotic or affective mental health outcomes.We searched Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Knowledge, ISI Proceedings, ZETOC, BIOSIS, LILACS, and MEDCARIB from their inception to September, 2006 (...) , searched reference lists of studies selected for inclusion, and contacted experts. Studies were included if longitudinal and population based. 35 studies from 4804 references were included. Data extraction and quality assessment were done independently and in duplicate.There was an increased risk of any psychotic outcome in individuals who had ever used cannabis (pooled adjusted odds ratio=1.41, 95% CI 1.20-1.65). Findings were consistent with a dose-response effect, with greater risk in people who

2007 Lancet PubMed

111. Cannabis use increases the risk of young people developing psychotic symptoms, particularly if already predisposed (Full text)

Cannabis use increases the risk of young people developing psychotic symptoms, particularly if already predisposed Cannabis use increases the risk of young people developing psychotic symptoms, particularly if already predisposed | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Cannabis use increases the risk of young people developing psychotic symptoms, particularly if already predisposed Article Text Aetiology Cannabis use increases

2006 Evidence-Based Mental Health PubMed

112. Psychotherapeutic interventions for cannabis abuse and/or dependence in outpatient settings. (PubMed)

Psychotherapeutic interventions for cannabis abuse and/or dependence in outpatient settings. Cannabis use disorder is the most common illicit substance use disorder in general population. Despite that, only a minority seek assistance from a health professional, but the demand for treatment is now increasing internationally. Trials of treatment have been published but to our knowledge, there is no published systematic review .To evaluate the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for cannabis (...) abuse or dependence.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Trials (CENTRAL) The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2004; MEDLINE (January 1966 to August 2004), PsycInfo (1985 to October 2004), CINAHL (1982 to October 2004), Toxibase (until September 2004) and reference lists of articles. We also contacted researchers in the field.All randomized controlled studies examining a psychotherapeutic intervention for cannabis dependence or abuse in comparison with a delayed-treatment control group

2006 Cochrane

113. Cannabis intoxication and fatal road crashes in France: population based case-control study. (Full text)

Cannabis intoxication and fatal road crashes in France: population based case-control study. To evaluate the relative risk of being responsible for a fatal crash while driving under the influence of cannabis, the prevalence of such drivers within the driving population, and the corresponding share of fatal crashes.Population based case-control study.10 748 drivers, with known drug and alcohol concentrations, who were involved in fatal crashes in France from October 2001 to September 2003 (...) .The cases were the 6766 drivers considered at fault in their crash; the controls were 3006 drivers selected from the 3982 other drivers. Positive detection of cannabis was defined as a blood concentration of Delta9tetrahydrocannabinol of over 1 ng/ml. The prevalence of positive drivers in the driving population was estimated by standardising controls on drivers not at fault who were involved in crashes resulting in slight injuries.681 drivers were positive for cannabis (cases 8.8%, controls 2.8

2005 BMJ PubMed

114. Review: current evidence does not show a strong causal relation between the use of cannabis in young people and psychosocial harm (Full text)

Review: current evidence does not show a strong causal relation between the use of cannabis in young people and psychosocial harm Review: current evidence does not show a strong causal relation between the use of cannabis in young people and psychosocial harm | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our (...) . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: current evidence does not show a strong causal relation between the use of cannabis in young people and psychosocial harm

2005 Evidence-Based Mental Health PubMed

115. Prospective cohort study of cannabis use, predisposition for psychosis, and psychotic symptoms in young people. (Full text)

Prospective cohort study of cannabis use, predisposition for psychosis, and psychotic symptoms in young people. To investigate the relation between cannabis use and psychotic symptoms in individuals with above average predisposition for psychosis who first used cannabis during adolescence.Analysis of prospective data from a population based sample. Assessment of substance use, predisposition for psychosis, and psychotic symptoms was based on standardised personal interviews at baseline (...) and at follow up four years later.2437 young people (aged 14 to 24 years) with and without predisposition for psychosis.Psychotic symptoms at follow up as a function of cannabis use and predisposition for psychosis at baseline.After adjustment for age, sex, socioeconomic status, urbanicity, childhood trauma, predisposition for psychosis at baseline, and use of other drugs, tobacco, and alcohol, cannabis use at baseline increased the cumulative incidence of psychotic symptoms at follow up four years later

2005 BMJ PubMed

116. Psychological and social sequelae of cannabis and other illicit drug use by young people: a systematic review of longitudinal, general population studies. (PubMed)

Psychological and social sequelae of cannabis and other illicit drug use by young people: a systematic review of longitudinal, general population studies. Use of illicit drugs, particularly cannabis, by young people is widespread and is associated with several types of psychological and social harm. These relations might not be causal. Causal relations would suggest that recreational drug use is a substantial public health problem. Non-causal relations would suggest that harm-reduction policy (...) by young people and psychosocial harm.We identified 48 relevant studies, of which 16 were of higher quality and provided the most robust evidence. Fairly consistent associations were noted between cannabis use and both lower educational attainment and increased reported use of other illicit drugs. Less consistent associations were noted between cannabis use and both psychological health problems and problematic behaviour. All these associations seemed to be explicable in terms of non-causal

2004 Lancet

117. Self reported cannabis use as a risk factor for schizophrenia in Swedish conscripts of 1969: historical cohort study. (Full text)

Self reported cannabis use as a risk factor for schizophrenia in Swedish conscripts of 1969: historical cohort study. An association between use of cannabis in adolescence and subsequent risk of schizophrenia was previously reported in a follow up of Swedish conscripts. Arguments were raised that this association may be due to use of drugs other than cannabis and that personality traits may have confounded results. We performed a further analysis of this cohort to address these uncertainties (...) while extending the follow up period to identify additional cases.Historical cohort study.1969-70 survey of Swedish conscripts (>97% of the country's male population aged 18-20).50 087 subjects: data were available on self reported use of cannabis and other drugs, and on several social and psychological characteristics.Admissions to hospital for ICD-8/9 schizophrenia and other psychoses, as determined by record linkage.Cannabis was associated with an increased risk of developing schizophrenia

2002 BMJ PubMed

118. Cannabis use and mental health in young people: cohort study. (Full text)

Cannabis use and mental health in young people: cohort study. To determine whether cannabis use in adolescence predisposes to higher rates of depression and anxiety in young adulthood.Seven wave cohort study over six years.44 schools in the Australian state of Victoria.A statewide secondary school sample of 1601 students aged 14-15 followed for seven years.Interview measure of depression and anxiety (revised clinical interview schedule) at wave 7.Some 60% of participants had used cannabis (...) by the age of 20; 7% were daily users at that point. Daily use in young women was associated with an over fivefold increase in the odds of reporting a state of depression and anxiety after adjustment for intercurrent use of other substances (odds ratio 5.6, 95% confidence interval 2.6 to 12). Weekly or more frequent cannabis use in teenagers predicted an approximately twofold increase in risk for later depression and anxiety (1.9, 1.1 to 3.3) after adjustment for potential baseline confounders

2002 BMJ PubMed

119. Cognitive functioning of long-term heavy cannabis users seeking treatment. (PubMed)

Cognitive functioning of long-term heavy cannabis users seeking treatment. Cognitive impairments are associated with long-term cannabis use, but the parameters of use that contribute to impairments and the nature and endurance of cognitive dysfunction remain uncertain.To examine the effects of duration of cannabis use on specific areas of cognitive functioning among users seeking treatment for cannabis dependence.Multisite retrospective cross-sectional neuropsychological study conducted (...) in the United States (Seattle, Wash; Farmington, Conn; and Miami, Fla) between 1997 and 2000 among 102 near-daily cannabis users (51 long-term users: mean, 23.9 years of use; 51 shorter-term users: mean, 10.2 years of use) compared with 33 nonuser controls.Measures from 9 standard neuropsychological tests that assessed attention, memory, and executive functioning, and were administered prior to entry to a treatment program and following a median 17-hour abstinence.Long-term cannabis users performed

2002 JAMA