Latest & greatest articles for cannabis

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on cannabis or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on cannabis and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for cannabis

61. Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety

Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety Cannabis Use During Pregnancy: Safety Published on: April 26, 2017 Project Number: RB1087-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type: Report Question What is the clinical evidence regarding the safety of cannabis use during pregnancy? Key Message Two systematic reviews with meta-analyses and nine non (...) -randomized studies were identified regarding the safety of cannabis use (medical or recreational) during pregnancy for pregnant women and their children. Tags cannabinoids, cannabis, marijuana abuse, pregnancy, pregnant women, teratogens, gynecology/obstetrics, Maternal, Gestation, Abnormality, Fetal, marijuana, marihuana Files Rapid Response Summary of Abstracts Published : April 26, 2017 Related Content Follow us: © 2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health Get our newsletter:

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

62. The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines

The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: A Review of Safety and Guidelines Published on: April 19, 2017 Project Number: RC0878-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary (...) with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the clinical evidence regarding the safety of the use of medical cannabis with other medications? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the interaction of the use of medical cannabis with other medications? Key Message Limited data on medical cannabis and drug-drug interactions were obtained from a low quality systematic review. Nabilone may have additive depressant effects with diazepam when taken together with alcohol and codeine

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

63. Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines

Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines Medical Cannabis in Residential Transition or Addiction Programs: A Review (...) of Clinical and Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines Published on: April 5, 2017 Project Number: RC0870-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of medical cannabis in adults with addictions being treated in residential transition/addiction programs? What is the cost-effectiveness of medical cannabis in adults with addictions being treated in residential transition/addiction programs? What

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

64. Effect of early, brief computerized interventions on risky alcohol and cannabis use among young people

Effect of early, brief computerized interventions on risky alcohol and cannabis use among young people A Campbell Systematic Review 2017:6 Social Welfare Coordinating Group Geir Smedslund, Sabine Wollscheid, Lin Fang, Wendy Nilsen, Asbjørn Steiro and Lillebeth Larun Effects of Early, Computerized Brief Interventions on Risky Alcohol Use and Risky Cannabis Use Among Young People Published: April 2017 Search executed:April 2016The Campbell Library comprises: • Systematic reviews (titles (...) , protocols and reviews) • Policies and Guidelines Series • Methods Series Go to the library to download these resources, at: www.campbellcollaboration.org/library/ Better evidence for a better world Colophon Title Effects of early, computerized brief interventions on risky alcohol use and risky cannabis use among young people Institution The Campbell Collaboration Authors Smedslund, Geir Wollscheid, Sabine Fang, Lin Nilsen, Wendy Steiro, Asbjørn Larun, Lillebeth DOI 10.4073/csr.2017.6 No. of pages 213

2017 Campbell Collaboration

65. National Research Agenda on the Health Impacts of Non-Medical Cannabis Use

National Research Agenda on the Health Impacts of Non-Medical Cannabis Use www.ccsa.ca • www.cclt.ca Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse •Centre canadien de lutte contre les toxicomanies Page 1 National Research Agenda on the Health Impacts of Non-Medical Cannabis Use The Issue As Canada moves towards regulating cannabis for non-medical use, there is a pressing need for evidence on the health-related effects of non-medical cannabis use to inform policy decisions. Legislative changes (...) and the impact of these changes must be informed by current, high- quality research and must be monitored to avoid negative impacts on the health of Canadians. Because cannabis use, regulations and impacts cross jurisdictional and sectoral boundaries, generating this research requires a collaborative approach. Expert and Stakeholder Meeting Since 2008, CCSA has worked with federal, provincial and municipal partners at the bureaucratic and political levels to provide evidence- informed advice and analysis

2017 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

66. The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety

The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety | CADTH.ca Find the information you need The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety The Use of Medical Cannabis with Other Medications: Safety Published on: February 23, 2017 Project Number: RA0896-000 Product Line: Research Type: Drug Report Type: Reference List Result type: Report Question What is the clinical evidence regarding the safety of the use of medical (...) cannabis with other medications? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the interaction of the use of medical cannabis with other medications? Key Message Two systematic reviews and one non-randomized study were identified regarding the safety of the use of medical cannabis with other medications. Tags cannabinoids, cannabis, drug interactions, drug therapy, marijuana smoking, pharmaceutical preparations, marihuana, marijuana, complementary medicine, Therapeutic, Alcohol, illicit substance

2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

67. Benefits and Harms of Cannabis in Chronic Pain or PTSD

Benefits and Harms of Cannabis in Chronic Pain or PTSD Management Briefs eBrief-no122 -- Enter search terms Button to search HSRD ® Inside VA Budget and Performance Inside the News Room National Observances Special Events » » » » » Management Briefs eBrief-no122 -- Health Services Research & Development Management eBrief no. 122 » Issue 122 February 2017 The report is a product of the VA/HSR&D Evidence Synthesis Program. Benefits and Harms of Cannabis in Chronic Pain or PTSD: A Systematic (...) Review Recent studies suggest that from 45% to 80% of individuals who seek cannabis for medical purposes do so for pain management, and an estimated 6% to 39% of patients who are prescribed opioid medication for pain also use cannabis. In addition, more than one-third of patients seeking cannabis for medical purposes cite post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as the primary reason for the request. Approximately 15% of Veterans who are treated in VA outpatient PTSD clinics report recent (past six

2017 Veterans Affairs - R&D

68. Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis

Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis www.ccsa.ca Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis January 201 7 This research report contains strong language and profanity that some readers could find offensive. Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis This document was published by the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CCSA). Suggested citation: McKiernan, A., & Fleming, K. (201 7) Canadian Youth Perceptions on Cannabis, Ottawa, Ont.: Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse. © Canadian Centre on Substance (...) Abuse, 201 7. CCSA, 500–75 Albert Street Ottawa, ON K1P 5E7 Tel.: 613-235-4048 Email: info@ccsa.ca Production of this document has been made possible through a financial contribution from Health Canada. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of Health Canada. This document can also be downloaded as a PDF at www.ccsa.ca Ce document est également disponible en français sous le titre : Les perceptions des jeunes canadiens sur le cannabis ISBN 978-1-77178-371-2Canadian Youth

2017 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

70. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Cannabis Use and Driving ? An Update

Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Cannabis Use and Driving ? An Update Key Points • Among young drivers, driving after using cannabis is more prevalent than driving after drinking. • Cannabis impairs the cognitive and motor abilities necessary to operate a motor vehicle and doubles the risk of crash involvement. • After alcohol, cannabis is the most commonly detected substance among drivers who die in traffic crashes. • The police have the tools and authority required to detect and arrest drivers (...) who are impaired by cannabis. Background After alcohol, cannabis, also referred to as marijuana, is the most widely used psychoactive substance in Canada. According to the 2015 Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS), 12.3% of Canadians aged 15 years and older reported using cannabis at least once in the past year (Statistics Canada, 2016), significantly higher than the 10.6 in 2013. The use of cannabis is generally more prevalent among youth, with 20.6% of youth aged 15 to 19 and 29.7

2017 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

71. Escalation of drug use in early-onset cannabis users vs co-twin controls. (PubMed)

Escalation of drug use in early-onset cannabis users vs co-twin controls. Previous studies have reported that early initiation of cannabis (marijuana) use is a significant risk factor for other drug use and drug-related problems.To examine whether the association between early cannabis use and subsequent progression to use of other drugs and drug abuse/dependence persists after controlling for genetic and shared environmental influences.Cross-sectional survey conducted in 1996-2000 among (...) an Australian national volunteer sample of 311 young adult (median age, 30 years) monozygotic and dizygotic same-sex twin pairs discordant for early cannabis use (before age 17 years).Self-reported subsequent nonmedical use of prescription sedatives, hallucinogens, cocaine/other stimulants, and opioids; abuse or dependence on these drugs (including cannabis abuse/dependence); and alcohol dependence.Individuals who used cannabis by age 17 years had odds of other drug use, alcohol dependence, and drug abuse

2017 JAMA

72. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Chronic Use and Cognitive Functioning and Mental Health ? An Update

Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Chronic Use and Cognitive Functioning and Mental Health ? An Update Key Points • Chronic cannabis use is related to mild cognitive impairments and an increased risk for poor mental health. These relationships raise the possibility that its use can also interfere with academic, workplace and social functioning, particularly in young people. There is a need for efforts that focus on preventing, delaying and reducing the use of cannabis by adolescents and young (...) adults. • Chronic cannabis use has been associated with mild impairments of memory, attention and other cognitive functions. The degree to which these impairments are reversible following cessation of cannabis use is uncertain. • There is emerging evidence that chronic cannabis use can affect brain development and functioning in areas that are important for cognitive and emotional processes. • Longitudinal studies indicate that chronic cannabis use and an earlier onset of use is associated

2016 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

73. Opioids Out, Cannabis In Negotiating the Unknowns in Patient Care for Chronic Pain (Full text)

Opioids Out, Cannabis In Negotiating the Unknowns in Patient Care for Chronic Pain 27802551 2016 12 13 2018 11 13 1538-3598 316 17 2016 Nov 01 JAMA JAMA Opioids Out, Cannabis In: Negotiating the Unknowns in Patient Care for Chronic Pain. 1763-1764 10.1001/jama.2016.13677 Choo Esther K EK Center for Policy and Research in Emergency Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. Feldstein Ewing Sarah W SW Department of Psychiatry, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland. Lovejoy

2016 JAMA PubMed

74. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Medical Use of Cannabis and Cannabinoids ? An Update

Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Medical Use of Cannabis and Cannabinoids ? An Update Key Points • Healthcare practitioners need access to the best available scientific evidence to help patients make informed decisions about the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids. There is a great need for well-designed prospective clinical trials in Canada that assess the efficacy of cannabis and cannabinoids in treating various conditions. • Evidence suggests that cannabis and cannabinoids are effective (...) for the relief of nausea and vomiting, and certain types of pain, as well as the stimulation of appetite. However, there is insufficient research to promote cannabis and cannabinoids as a primary or first line option for these symptoms. • More research is needed to determine the risks associated with the medical use of cannabis. However, research on chronic cannabis use has linked it to risks and harms such as reduced cognitive functioning and negative respiratory symptoms. • Patients who ingest cannabis

2016 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

75. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis - Respiratory Effects of Cannabis Smoking

Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis - Respiratory Effects of Cannabis Smoking Key Points • Cannabis smoking has been consistently related to a greater incidence of cough, wheeze, aggravation of asthma, sore throat, chest tightness, shortness of breath and hoarse voice. • There is emerging evidence that quitting cannabis smoking can reverse some of the negative respiratory symptoms associated with its use. • Cannabis smoke contains many of the same chemicals as tobacco smoke, several of which (...) are known carcinogens. Evidence for a link between cannabis smoking and serious conditions such as lung cancer is mixed. Further research is needed to clarify whether cannabis smoke is a causal factor for lung cancer. • Many recent epidemiological studies suggest no causal relationship between cannabis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), at least in low to moderate cumulative doses. • Further research is needed to clarify whether heavy cannabis smoking is a causal factor for COPD. Because

2016 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

76. Psychosocial interventions for cannabis use disorder. (Full text)

Psychosocial interventions for cannabis use disorder. Cannabis use disorder is the most commonly reported illegal substance use disorder in the general population; although demand for assistance from health services is increasing internationally, only a minority of those with the disorder seek professional assistance. Treatment studies have been published, but pressure to establish public policy requires an updated systematic review of cannabis-specific treatments for adults.To evaluate (...) the efficacy of psychosocial interventions for cannabis use disorder (compared with inactive control and/or alternative treatment) delivered to adults in an out-patient or community setting.We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 6), MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, the Cumulaive Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and reference lists of articles. Searched literature included all articles published before July 2015.All randomised controlled studies

2016 Cochrane PubMed

77. Is the medical use of cannabis a therapeutic option for children?

Is the medical use of cannabis a therapeutic option for children? Cannabis is a psychoactive compound with a long history of recreational and therapeutic use. Current considerations regarding cannabis use for medical purposes in children have been stimulated by recent case reports describing its beneficial effect with refractory epilepsy. Overall, there are insufficient data to support either the efficacy or safety of cannabis use for any indications in children, and an increasing body of data (...) suggests possible harm, most importantly in specific conditions. The potential for cannabis as a therapeutic agent must be evaluated carefully for both efficacy and safety in treating specific paediatric health conditions. Smoking is not an acceptable mode of drug delivery for children. The use of cannabis for medical purposes in specific cases should not be construed as a justification for recreational cannabis use by adolescents. Recommendations for therapeutic use in exceptional paediatric cases

2016 Canadian Paediatric Society

78. Talking Pot with Youth: A Cannabis Communication Guide for Youth Allies

Talking Pot with Youth: A Cannabis Communication Guide for Youth Allies A Cannabis Communication Guide for Youth Allies Co-designed with input from youth and youth allies Acknowledgements This guide is stronger because of the expertise of the youth and youth allies who were involved in its creation. Authors: Katie Fleming, MA, and Anna McKiernan, MA This project was supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and benefited from the advice of Health Canada. CCSA would like (...) to acknowledge Kiran Somjee, RN, National Priority Advisor and Chealsea De Moor, MA, Knowledge Broker for their contributions in the development and dissemination of this resource. © Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction, 2018. CCSA, 500–75 Albert Street Ottawa, ON K1P 5E7 | Tel.: 613-235-4048 | Email: info@ccsa.ca Suggested citation Fleming, K., & McKiernan, A. (2018). Cannabis Communication Guide for Youth Allies. Ottawa, Ont.: Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction. ISBN: 978-1-77178-505

2016 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

79. High-potency cannabis increases the risk of psychosis

High-potency cannabis increases the risk of psychosis High-potency cannabis increases the risk of psychosis | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password (...) ? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here High-potency cannabis increases the risk of psychosis Article Text Causes and risk factors High-potency cannabis increases the risk of psychosis Emma Barkus Correspondence to University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia; ebarkus{at}uow.edu.au Statistics from

2016 Evidence-Based Mental Health

80. Cannabis use and treatment resistance in first episode psychosis: a natural language processing study. (Full text)

Cannabis use and treatment resistance in first episode psychosis: a natural language processing study. Cannabis is frequently used among individuals with first episode psychosis and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. However, little is known about the effect of cannabis use on the response to antipsychotic medications and how use could affect outcomes. Using natural language processing on clinical data from a large electronic case register, we sought to investigate whether resistance (...) to antipsychotic treatment mediated poor clinical outcomes associated with cannabis use.Data were obtained from 2026 people with first episode psychosis in south London, UK. Cannabis use documented in free text clinical records was identified with natural language processing. Data for age, sex, ethnicity, marital status, psychotic disorder diagnosis, subsequent hospital admission, and number of unique antipsychotic medications prescribed were obtained using the Clinical Record Interactive Search instrument

2015 Lancet PubMed